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Author Topic: Organ Donation  (Read 1788 times) Average Rating: 0
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Justin
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« on: August 21, 2003, 12:51:05 AM »

Check out http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/17/national/17KIDN.html?ex=1061870400&en=10bd2dea3551c69c&ei=5059&partner=AOL

I don't know what motivates this man, nor do I know the Church's teaching on organ donation, but it is a little inspirational, he is very charitable.
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ania
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« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2003, 11:06:45 AM »

Indeed he is very cheritable.  
As far as the Church's teachings on organ donation, I have a 13 year-old cousin who at the age of 6 had a live liver transplant from her father (they gave her 1/3 of his liver, & it regenerated fully after a few months & he fully recovered), and then last year she had another transplant after her father's liver was rejected.  This one came from a 16 year old girl who died in a car crash.  My grandfather, being a priest, did a lot of research into organ donation & how it related to the church, and he came to the conclusion that as long as it's not the heart, then there is no problem & can be done.
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Now where were we? Oh yeah - the important thing was I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn’t have white onions because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones...
Jonathan
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« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2003, 02:47:20 PM »

how come not the heart?
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Hypo-Ortho
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2003, 09:43:50 AM »

how come not the heart?

Probably from the remnant of the ancient belief that the heart is the repository of the soul, I would think, Jonathan.  And the possibility that the person's soul may not have left the body immediately after the physicians have proclaimed the person to be clinically dead.  It's still an ethical question.  I remember a lecture I attended at St. Vladimir's Seminary some years ago in which the renowned Orthodox ethicists, the Rev. Dr. Stanley Harakas and the Very Rev. John Breck, answered a question from the audience on this very topic.  I don't recall either of them opposing kydney donations from an ethical standpoint, however.  

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Jonathan
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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2003, 11:29:45 AM »

Ok, that makes sense, thanks.
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Hypo-Ortho
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2003, 07:21:26 PM »

Fr. Stanley Harakas addressed posthumous organ donation in his columns and books, concluding that although the issue had never been formally addressed by the Church, as it was an act of love that would save another, it was a practice to be considered after discussion with one's family and spirtual father.  I have never read anywhere that the heart was exempted...did Fr. Stanley address this at SVS?

Not in so many words.  The heart, however, was about the only place where Fathers Stanley and John differed vis-a-vis organ transplants.  My former parish priest came down strongly behind Father John Breck's rationale, the physical/spiritual heart having traditionally such a major role in Orthodox spirituality.  The ethical question remains: would the heart be "harvested" even though the possibility remains that the soul has not left the physical body, and scientists have different opinions, even to this day, as to when death actually occurs?

Hypo-Ortho
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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2003, 10:46:38 PM »

Speaking of organ donations, we're having a blood drive at our parish festival September 27 2003 at St. John of the Ladder Orthodox Church.  Anyone who wants to come is welcome! Smiley
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Ebor
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« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2003, 12:16:06 AM »

I read the article some time ago and thought about it. I found several things about the man disquieting.  First, his stating that he's no more important than anyone else in the world...it sounds humble, but leads to the question important to whom?!  He has children for whom (I hope) he *IS* more important than a stranger down the street since he is their father.  You don't just move out one parent and put in a duplicate.  So if he died they would be devestated as would his wife. A married man's life is not his own to do with as he wishes in normal circumstances, there are responsibilities.

Then there was his doing this behind his wife's back... because he thought she'd try to stop him. Well, he's willing to break trust in his marriage to do his own will.  

His statement that his children are no more important than anyone else in the world is disturbing. It seems to me that he places them as less important than others, perhaps in that there is no concern for what his deeds might do to them.

In general, this man seems to be setting up *his* decisions and ideas as an ultimate.  Near the end of the article he says that it's not fair for anyone to have 2 kidneys until everyone has one... well, it sounds noble may be, but who is he to dictate? Life isn't fair, as we've all be told, I should think.   Will he then say that no-one should be happy until everyone is happy?  It won't happen in this life.  

Pardon me if I sound blunt, but he comes across as assured of his own righteousness and gets publicity for a good deed .  Why do I hear "He has his reward" in the back of my head

It is good that the young woman will have a working kidney.  But the man is making his family pay a price.

Ebor
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