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« on: September 23, 2007, 08:26:25 AM »

God bless!+

It would be nice to get some informations about the many western orthodox saints /shrines!
There services , icons, prayers, feastdays, reliquies?

For example: the great Martyr Florianos of Lorch (Austria) he was martyred under Diokletian 303/304 with other 40 Martyrs

St. Florian
Feastday: May 4


St. Florian
The St. Florian commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on May 4th, was an officer of the Roman army, who occupied a high administrative post in Noricum, now part of Austria, and who suffered death for the Faith in the days of Diocletian. His legendary "Acts" state that he gave himself up at Lorch to the soldiers of Aquilinus, the governor, when they were rounding up the Christians, and after making a bold confession, he was twice scourged, half-flayed alive, set on fire, and finally thrown into the river Enns with a stone around his neck. His body, recovered and buried by a pious woman, was eventually removed to the Augustinian Abbey of St. Florian, near Linz. It is said to have been at a later date translated to Rome, and Pope Lucius III, in 1138, gave some of the saint's relics to King Casimir of Poland and to the Bishop of Cracow. Since that time, St. Florian has been regarded as a patron of Poland as well as of Linz, Upper Austria and of firemen. There has been popular devotion to St. Florian in many parts of central Europe, and the tradition as to his martyrdom, not far from the spot where the Enns flows into the Danube, is ancient and reliable. Many miracles of healing are attributed to his intercession and he is invoked as a powerful protector in danger from fire or water. His feast day is May 4th.


http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=149

Saint Severin of Noricum the Apsotel of the Danube:

St. Severinus
Feastday: January 8
482
Monk, hermit, and founder. He labored to evangelize the region of Noricum (part of. modem Austria), establishing a number of monasteries along the Danube River near modern Vienna. In his last years, he gave aid and comfort to the many refugees and victims of the invasion of the region by Attila and the Huns. He was known for his preaching and prophecies, Severinus died on January 5. His relics were later carried to Naples. Italy, and enshrined in the Benedictine monastery of San Severino.

St. Maximilian of Lorch
Feastday: October 12
284
Martyred bishop of Lorch. He was born at Cilli, modem Steiermark, in Styria, Austria, and disposed of his wealth to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Pope Sixtus II sent him to Lorch, near Passau, where he served two decades as a missionary bishop. He was then beheaded by command of the Roman Prefect Numerian at the gate of Cilli for refusing to sacrifice to the gods.

Many lifes of western orthodox saints:
http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/zeurope.htm

In CHRIST
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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2007, 11:57:48 AM »

Thans for this post. Below is a link to a thorough collection of Icons of western Saints.

http://www.allmercifulsavior.com/icons/Western.html
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2007, 12:20:59 PM »

One of my favourites is St. Fiacre. I've been searching for an Icon of him to enshrine in my garden ( he's the Patron of Gardeners). Interestingly, he is also the patron of taxi cab drivers; venereal disease sufferers; hemorrhoid sufferers, and brie cheese!

Here is his life:
St. Fiacre Abbot, born in Ireland about the end of the sixth century; died 18 August, 670. Having been ordained priest, he retired to a hermitage on the banks of the Nore of which the townland Kilfiachra, or Kilfera, County Kilkenny, still preserves the memory. Disciples flocked to him, but, desirous of greater solitude, he left his native land and arrived, in 628, at Meaux, where St. Faro then held episcopal sway. He was generously received by Faro, whose kindly feelings were engaged to the Irish monk for blessings which he and his father's house had received from the Irish missionary Columbanus. Faro granted him out of his own patrimony a site at Brogillum (Breuil) surrounded by forests. Here Fiacre built an oratory in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, a hospice in which he received strangers, and a cell in which he himself lived apart. He lived a life of great mortification, in prayer, fast, vigil, and the manual labour of the garden. Disciples gathered around him and soon formed a monastery. There is a legend that St. Faro allowed him as much land as he might surround in one day with a furrow; that Fiacre turned up the earth with the point of his crosier, and that an officious woman hastened to tell Faro that he was being beguiled; that Faro coming to the wood recognized that the wonderworker was a man of God and sought his blessing, and that Fiacre henceforth excluded women, on pain of severe bodily infirmity, from the precincts of his monastery. In reality, the exclusion of women was a common rule in the Irish foundations. His fame for miracles was widespread. He cured all manner of diseases by laying on his hands; blindness, polypus, fevers are mentioned, and especially a tumour or fistula since called "le fic de S. Fiacre". His remains were interred in the church at Breuil, where his sanctity was soon attested by the numerous cures wrought at his tomb. Many churches and oratories have been dedicated to him throughout France. His shrine at Breuil is still a resort for pilgrims with bodily ailments. In 1234 his remains were placed in a shrine by Pierre, Bishop of Meaux, his arm being encased in a separate reliquary. In 1479 the relics of Sts. Fiacre and Kilian were placed in a silver shrine, which was removed in 1568 to the cathedral church at Meaux for safety from the destructive fanaticism of the Calvinists. In 1617 the Bishop of Meaux gave part of the saint's body to the Grand Duke of Tuscany, and in 1637 the shrine was again opened and part of the vertebrae given to Cardinal Richelieu. A mystery play of the fifteenth century celebrates St. Fiacre's life and miracles. St. John of Matha, Louis XIII, and Anne of Austria were among his most famous clients. He is the patron of gardeners. The French cab derives its name from him. The Hôtel de St-Fiacre, in the Rue St-Martin, Paris, in the middle of the seventeenth century first let these coaches on hire. The sign of the inn was an image of the saint, and the coaches in time came to be called by his name. His feast is kept on the 11th of August.
http://www.users.bigpond.com/laperouse/saintfiacre.htm
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« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2007, 03:08:21 PM »

I know of St. Cuthbert, St. Columba, St. Finian, St. Bridget, And St. Sexberga.
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« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2007, 08:07:25 PM »

Are you sure you didn't make that last one up? Shocked Cheesy
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« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2007, 09:09:28 PM »

No foolin'!  Welsh saint.  But I ain't naming my daughter after her!  Or translating it for a son (Sexburger?).  My greatest apoligies to the saint and asking for her continuing prayers.
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« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2007, 09:20:20 PM »

But I ain't naming my daughter after her!
ROFL!  Cheesy
I think that's probably wise, and I'm sure the Saint will forgive you!
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« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2007, 10:56:53 PM »

Saint Martin the Merciful, Bishop of Tours

Martin was born of pagan parents in the Pannonian town of Sabaria in the year 316. His father was a Roman officer, and the young Martin was given over to military service against his will. By then, however, he was already a catechumen in the Christian Church. From early childhood he had loved the Church with all his heart. One winter, while traveling with his companions to the town of Amiens, he saw a beggar before the town gates, almost naked and shivering from the cold. Martin felt sorry for him, and fell behind his companions. He then removed his military cloak and cut it in two with his sword. He gave one half to the beggar and wrapped the other around himself, and left. That night, the Lord Jesus Christ appeared to him in a dream, wrapped in the other half of his cloak, and said to His angels: ``Martin is only a catechumen, yet behold: he has clothed Me with his garment!'' Leaving the army, Martin was immediately baptized, and then baptized his mother. He was then tonsured a monk in the diocese of St. Hilary of Poitiers and led a life of true asceticism. Martin was exceptionally humble, for which God endowed him with an abundant gift of working miracles, such that he raised the dead and drove out evil spirits. Martin was appointed Bishop of Tours against his will. After abundant labor in the vineyard of the Lord, and after a difficult struggle with pagans and Arian heretics, St. Martin gave his holy soul into the hands of his Lord in the year 397.


HYMN OF PRAISE

St. Martin, a child of Pannonia,
And the great illuminator of Gaul,
Despised the earthly emperor's honors,
And became a servant of the heavenly King.
The will of a powerful giant
Was in Martin's merciful heart.
Martin sprinkled himself with ashes,
And on the ashes this humble one slept,
Out of love for his God-
Crucified for sinful men.
And Martin had crucified himself to the world
Solely to reach the goal!
Martin led the battle against demons,
Yielding to none of their temptations,
And led the battle against impudent men,
Against dark, dishonorable heresies.
Martin was a knight of Orthodoxy,
And a victor, wondrous and glorious.
With the battle won, the knight rests
With the angels close to Christ the King:
And yet even now he lifts up prayers,
And comes to the aid of those in peril.


REFLECTION

By what virtue have the saints been most exalted and glorified in the eyes of heaven and men? Primarily by their humility and service. Even before his baptism, while he was still an officer, St. Martin had a servant whom he considered more a brother than a servant. He often served this servant unashamedly; in fact, he even rejoiced in it. Again, when St. Hilary wanted to ordain him a priest, he refused this honor with tears, and begged the bishop to let him simply be a monk in some remote place. Once, St. Martin was traveling from France to Pannonia to visit his parents. While he was crossing over the Alps, murderous robbers captured him. When one of the robbers raised his sword to behead him, Martin showed no fear, and remained motionless; he did not beg for mercy but was completely at peace, as if nothing were happening. The robber, amazed at such behavior, lay aside his sword and asked Martin who he was. Martin replied that he was a Christian, and hence, he was not afraid-for he knew that God, according to His great mercy, is always close to men, especially in times of danger. The thieves were astonished at the rare virtue of this man of God, and he who had drawn his sword against Martin believed in Christ, was baptized, and later became a monk. When the episcopal throne in Tours became vacant, the people wanted Martin to be bishop, but Martin did not even want to hear of it. However, certain citizens of Tours craftily lured him from the monastery and carried him off. They came to the gate of Martin's monastery and told the Martin that a sick man was out there with them, and they begged him for a blessing. When Martin came out they seized him, took him to Tours, and had him consecrated bishop. In old age, he foresaw his approaching death. He told his brethren and they began to weep copiously, begging him not to leave them. The saint, seeking to comfort them, prayed to God in their presence and said: ``Lord, if I am still needed by Thy people, I do not reject the labor. Let it be according to Thy holy will.'' Source

Life of St. Martin
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« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2007, 11:42:03 PM »

ST. VALETINE


"Valentine was a holy priest in Rome, who, with St. Marius and his family, assisted the martyrs in the persecution under Claudius II. He was apprehended, and sent by the emperor to the prefect of Rome, who, on finding all his promises to make him renounce his faith in effectual, commended him to be beaten with clubs, and afterwards, to be beheaded, which was executed on February 14, about the year 270. Pope Julius I is said to have built a church near Ponte Mole to he memory, which for a long time gave name to the gate now called Porta del Popolo, formerly, Porta Valetini. The greatest part of his relics are now in the church of St. Praxedes. His name is celebrated as that of an illustrious martyr in the sacramentary of St. Gregory, the Roman Missal of Thomasius, in the calendar of F. Fronto and that of Allatius, in Bede, Usuard, Ado, Notker and all other martyrologies on this day. To abolish the heathens lewd superstitious custom of boys drawing the names of girls, in honor of their goddess Februata Juno, on the fifteenth of this month, several zealous pastors substituted the names of saints in billets given on this day.

The Origin of St. Valentine
The origin of St. Valentine, and how many St. Valentines there were, remains a mystery. One opinion is that he was a Roman martyred for refusing to give up his Christian faith. Other historians hold that St. Valentine was a temple priest jailed for defiance during the reign of Claudius. Whoever he was, Valentine really existed because archaeologists have unearthed a Roman catacomb and an ancient church dedicated to Saint Valentine. In 496 AD Pope Gelasius marked February 14th as a celebration in honor of his martyrdom.

The first representation of Saint Valentine appeared in a The Nuremberg Chronicle, a great illustrated book printed in 1493. [Additional evidence that Valentine was a real person: archaeologists have unearthed a Roman catacomb and an ancient church dedicated to Saint Valentine.] Alongside a woodcut portrait of him, text states that Valentinus was a Roman priest martyred during the reign of Claudius the Goth [Claudius II]. Since he was caught marrying Christian couples and aiding any Christians who were being persecuted under Emperor Claudius in Rome [when helping them was considered a crime], Valentinus was arrested and imprisoned. Claudius took a liking to this prisoner -- until Valentinus made a strategic error: he tried to convert the Emperor -- whereupon this priest was condemned to death. He was beaten with clubs and stoned; when that didn't do it, he was beheaded outside the Flaminian Gate [circa 269].

Saints are not supposed to rest in peace; they're expected to keep busy: to perform miracles, to intercede. Being in jail or dead is no excuse for non-performance of the supernatural. One legend says, while awaiting his execution, Valentinus restored the sight of his jailer's blind daughter. Another legend says, on the eve of his death, he penned a farewell note to the jailer's daughter, signing it, "From your Valentine."

St. Valentine was a Priest, martyred in 269 at Rome and was buried on the Flaminian Way. He is the Patron Saint of affianced couples, bee keepers, engaged couples, epilepsy, fainting, greetings, happy marriages, love, lovers, plague, travellers, young people. He is represented in pictures with birds and roses."

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« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2007, 12:11:52 PM »

God bless!+

This western orthodox Saints are waiting for us! In our times were orthodox again are living in western europe we shold not pray without commemorating them.

St. Vitalis
Feastday: October 20
745
Abbot of St. Peter's Abbey at Salzburg, Austria, as the successor to St. Rupert. He later served as archbishop of Salzburg from 717.

St. Virgilius
Feastday: November 27
784
Benedictine bishop, also called Vergilius, Virgil, Ferghil, and Feargal. A native of Ireland, he entered a monastery and probably served as abbot of Aghaboe before setting out on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He then spent two years in France, later going to Bavaria, Germany, where he assisted St. Rupert, the Apostle of Austria. He was elected abbot of the Benedictine abbey of St. Peter at Salzburg and bishop of the city about 765. A noted intellectual, he believed that the earth was a sphere, which brought him into conflict with St. Boniface of Mainz who twice denounced him to Rome. Both times Virgilius was exonerated, and his reputation as an Apostle of Carinthia (modern southern Austria), where he conducted missionary labors, was unblemished. Besides rebuilding the cathedral of Salzburg, he encouraged a vast missionary venture into Carinthia. Virgilius died after returning from one such mission on November 27, in Salzbwg. He was canonized in 1232.

St. Rupert
Feastday: March 27
717
Bishop and missionary, also listed as Robert of Hrodbert. A member of a noble Frankish family, he was appointed bishop of Worms, Germany, and then dedicated himself to spreading the faith among the Germans. With the patronage of Duke Thedo of Bavaria, he took over the deserted town of luvavum about 697, which was renamed Salzburg, Austria. Rupert founded a church, a monastery, and a school; brought in groups of missionaries; and established a nunnery at Nonnberg with his sister, Eerentrudis, serving as the first abbess. He died at Salzburg and is venerated as the first archbishop of this major diocese in the West. Rupert is revered as the Apostle of Bavaria and Austria.


St. Wolfgang
 
Bishop of Ratisbon (972-994), born about 934; died at the village of Pupping in upper Austria, 31 October, 994. The name Wolfgang is of early German origin. St. Wolfgang was one of the three brilliant stars of the tenth century, St. Ulrich, St. Conrad, and St. Wolfgang, which illuminated the early medieval period of Germany with the undying splendour of their acts and services.
St. Wolfgang withdrew as a hermit to a solitary spot, now the Lake of St. Wolfgang, apparently on account of a political dispute, but probably in the course of a journey of inspection to the monastery of Mendsee which was under the direction of the bishops of Ratisbon. He was discovered by a hunter and brought back to Ratisbon. While travelling on the Danube to Pöchlarn in Lower Austria, he fell ill at the village of Pupping, which is between Efferding and the market town of Aschach near Linz, and at his request was carried into the chapel of St. Othmar at Pupping, where he died. His body was taken up the Danube by his friends Count Aribo of Andechs and Archbishop Hartwich of Salzburg to Ratisbon, and was solemnly buried in the crypt of St. Emmeram . Many miracles were performed at his grave; in 1052 he was canonized. Soon after his death many churches chose him as their patron saint , and various towns were named after him.

In CHRIST
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« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2007, 01:04:34 PM »

God bless!+

Like with the western orthodox Saints we should also look for Holy Orthodox Reliquies because they are everywhere!

In Aachen in Germany it is said that there is venerated the CHITON of the Theotokos,
please look here:

http://www.heiligtumsfahrt2007.de/index76-0.aspx

The reliquie of the Holy Garment of the Theotokos goes back to the time of King Karl the great, the Patriarch of Jerusalem brought them from the place of the "Resurrection" in the year 799/800 to Aachen! I think it was examined by sientists and it came out that it is an antike weaving-mill.


In CHRIST

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« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2007, 01:46:06 AM »

St. Edmund of East Anglia Martyred by Vikings in 870. A patron of mine.

orthodoxengland.org.uk has a bunch of St's from the British Isles.
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« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2007, 01:48:38 AM »

Can't forget about St. Patrick.
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« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2007, 02:18:47 AM »

Thans for this post. Below is a link to a thorough collection of Icons of western Saints.

http://www.allmercifulsavior.com/icons/Western.html

Oh!  This looks like that "odox.net" site that was formerly under the so-called "Synod of Milan" a while back.  Looks like they're trying to switch to the ROCOR.  Good for them!
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« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2007, 08:36:16 AM »

It certainly does. Austin as well.
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« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2007, 09:40:12 AM »

God bless!+

In Italy in a Chuch called Santa Croche ( Holy Cross) wich St. Helena founded they keep the Titulus of the Crucifixion . ( in the 3 languages mentioned in the gospel) !

In Vienna in the National Museum you can find the Holy Lance wich was used to pierce Christ in the left side! ( there are also two nails on the Lance). There is also a Church of Saint Anna the Mother of Theotokos in Vienna where the incorrupt right Hand can be venerated.

In Germany in Köln the Chiton of Christ is Shown every year.

In the Notre Dame in Paris every Lent the Crown of Thornes can be venerated.
What I know that there are many reliquies in England and Spain, Belgium?

In CHRIST

Perhaps someone has more information of the Holy Shroud of the Theotokos in Georgia?
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« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2007, 12:12:09 AM »

Those of you who drink Jagermeister would be familiar with the image of a deer with a luminous Cross between it's antlers:


This is the symbol of St. Hubert, the patron of hunters.

Some historical scholars estimate the year was 705 A.D. while others claim it was 656.  Regardless, St. Hubert, the Patron Saint of Hunters was born in the European city  of Maastricht of French  nationality.  All the scholars  agree Hubert died at Fura (the modern city of Tervueren) in  the province of Brabant on  May 30, 727 A.D.

Hubert was the oldest son of Bertrand, Duke of Aquintaine and grandson of Charibert, King of Toulouse - a descendant of The Great Pharamond.

Hubert was reportedly a great lover of pleasure and his chief passion was the chase, to which he devoted nearly all his time.  According to the legend, Hubert was afield the morning of Good Friday (while the faithful were crowding into church) and he was participating in the chase of a deer on horseback with his famous hounds.

The Catholic Encyclopedia states: As he was pursuing a magnificent stag, and in a clearing in the forest, the animal stopped and turned.  Hubert was astounded at perceiving a crucifix suspended between its antlers, while he heard a voice from the figure of Christ say, "Hubert, unless you turn to the Lord, and lead a holy life, you shall quickly fall into the abyss of Hell!"

Hubert dismounted immediately from his horse, fell prostrate on the ground and asked, "Lord, what would you have me do?"

He immediately received the reply, "Go and seek Lambert and he will instruct you."

At the time, Lambert was the Bishop of Maastricht, who kindly received Hubert and became his spiritual advisor.  Complicating matters even further, Hubert lost his wife during the childbirth of their first son shortly after his vision in the woods.  Hubert decided to renounce all his honors, titles and military rank.  Plus he relinquished his birthright as heir to the Duchy of Aquintaine, giving it to his younger brother Eudon, whom he also made the godfather of his infant son, Floribert.

Another version of the legend reports Lambert taught Hubert self discipline by forcing him to live alone as a hermit in the Ardennes (the Great French Forest) for a while.

After distributing all his wealth among the poor, Hubert entered upon his studies for the priesthood and was soon ordained.  Shortly afterward he became one of Lambert's chief associates in the administration of his Diocese.  Upon the advice of Lambert, Hubert made a pilgrimage to Rome and during his absence, Lambert was assassinated, but that's another story in itself.  At the same hour as the Pope was giving an audience to Hubert, the Pope was distracted by a vision of Lambert's murder and on the spot he appointed Hubert as the new Bishop, replacing Lambert.  Hubert returned to become the 31st Bishop of Maastricht (and the first Bishop of Liege) and was eventually described as the "Apostle of the Ardennes."

According to the legend, idolatry still lingered in the Ardennes Forest and "risking his life, Hubert penetrated the remote lurking places of paganism in his pursuit of souls and finally brought about the abolishment of the worship of idols in his neighborhood."

Eventually, Hubert went to dedicate a new church but had another vision, this one of his impending death.  He continued anyway, preaching a valedictory sermon and fell sick almost immediately.  Within six days, Hubert died while repeating The Lord's Prayer.  The Roman Catholic Church has designated his feast day as November 3, appropriately enough since the rut is usually at or near its peak by then.

Hubert reportedly also worked several miracles during his life by exorcising those possessed by demons and curing a case of rabies after making the sign of the cross over the victim.  Hubert is also the patron saint for archers, forest workers, furriers and trappers, hunters and huntsmen as well as hunting as a profession.  He is also the patron saint for mathematicians, machinists, precision instrument makers and smelters along with those stricken with hydrophobia (rabies) and dogs.

In a related topic, bloodhounds (which are well known for their scenting ability and commonly acknowledged as ancestors of many different hunting dog breeds) reportedly originated from a cross between the black hounds of St. Hubert and the white hounds of the House of Talbot - both of which are from the Ardennes.  Records from the House of Talbot provide further credence to this theory and tradition indicates many bloodhounds in Europe are still known and registered as the "Ohien de St. Hubert."

Hubert's representation is a stag bearing a cross or crucifix between its antlers: Hence the Master Hunter's (or Jagermeister's) Badge of Honor.

Jagermeister Bottle.In fact the bottle cap on an imported bottle of Jagermeister herbal liqueur is a duplication of the Master Hunter's badge.  The bottle's label also has the same representation of a stag with a shining cross, suspended between the antlers, as the brand's logo.  Surrounding the label is a German phrase, which loosely translated means: "This is the hunter's badge of honor, which he protects and wears as his shield, to guard, while in the fine and honorable profession of hunting; which also honors the Creator and his creations."

Literally translated, Jagermeister means Master Hunter in the German language.  The term is applied to those who have rightfully earned the respect of their peers and regular citizens as well.  German heritage requires much more of hunters than simply passing an eight-hour safety course before being issued a license.  In that country it is a privilege to go afield with a firearm and the sport requires many seasons of apprenticeship.

Following four years of apprenticeship a hunter is then allowed to take the exam for Jagermeister certification.  This distinct traditional heritage is from the country that also brought us the legend of Bambi.  You'll recall the bad guys in the original Bambi story were "poachers," not hunters.  There is no anti-hunting social agenda in Germany since the sport is highly regulated and steeped in tradition.  Hunters are welcomed everywhere.

German hunters also participate in extensive rituals following the death of a big game animal taken while hunting, along with other cultural heritages including a toast to the fallen animal itself.  Caveman instincts bond all hunters when they're in the field - no matter what modern civilization has done to each person.

Quite possibly those centuries-old traditions are what has evolved into the North American big game hunter's need to participate in some form of ceremony following the kill.  Maybe they are unsure of just where or how it started, but many hunters (including Native Americans) repeat a prayer, or chant, or simply express their joy with a shout of excitement after the shot is confirmed and the animal is down.

Anything from smearing the blood of a freshly killed deer on your face (similar to war paint) to saying a brief prayer of thanks to loud whoops, or simply firm handshakes all around pretty much describe the range of activities surrounding a freshly killed deer or elk here in America.  It certainly is a rite of passage for a youngster to take their first big game animal and it's an experience they'll never forget.

Regardless, giving thanks to the dead animal, and to God, for the resulting nourishment must be what it's all about.  Respect for the fallen, and seeking a blessing for the meat, and honoring the death of one of God's creatures must be the catalyst for these traditions.  Of course tagging fresh venison is the object, but preparing for and participating in the hunt is almost as rewarding.  Activities surrounding the hunt as well as the camaraderie involved with the "tribe" provide untold pleasure as it creates lasting memories.

It is very inappropriate to desecrate, actually violating the sacredness, of any mounted animal with sunglasses, hats, or cigarettes shoved into a taxidermist's work of art.  Humoring people who've never participated in the honor of taking a wild game animal's life is disgusting.  Domesticated animals provide suitable protein but they don't enjoy the freedom of the wildness experienced by game animals during their lives in the forests and fields.  Our teeth and stomachs convert that deer's living energy into our own and we owe it much deserved respect.

So, if you wish, say a prayer of thanksgiving or ask a blessing of St. Hubert when you kill your next deer or elk; just remember to honor the death of the wild animal and utilize the meat with respect. It died so that you might live.
Source: http://www.thecross-photo.com/Hubert-Patron_Saint_of_Hunters-Written_by_Mitch_Ballard.htm
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« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2007, 08:15:04 AM »

Antlers, huh? Interesting parallel to earlier Martyr Eustathios.
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« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2007, 08:53:18 PM »

Antlers, huh? Interesting parallel to earlier Martyr Eustathios.

God bless !

Yes, there is also another Saint who saw the cross between the antlers- was it the Martyr Eustathios ?

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« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2007, 09:06:48 PM »

God bless!+

Like with the western orthodox Saints we should also look for Holy Orthodox Reliquies because they are everywhere!

In Aachen in Germany it is said that there is venerated the CHITON of the Theotokos,
please look here:

http://www.heiligtumsfahrt2007.de/index76-0.aspx

The reliquie of the Holy Garment of the Theotokos goes back to the time of King Karl the great, the Patriarch of Jerusalem brought them from the place of the "Resurrection" in the year 799/800 to Aachen! I think it was examined by sientists and it came out that it is an antike weaving-mill.


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I remember being told that some Orthodox Church had the relics of a canonized King of England.  Evidently the present authorities want them, but the Church won their case that the state had abadoned the remains before the Orthodox aquired them.

I remember being in Trondheim Cathedral and being told that the kings body was reburied on the grounds.  How I wanted to venerate St. Olaf!
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« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2007, 09:16:30 PM »

Thank you, all, for sharing excellent information!
Some additional articles may be found at Orthodox Wiki:
http://orthodoxwiki.org/Category:Saints

Actually, in UK the veneration of British Orthodox Saints grows as we speak. Several parishes have been named in honor of them. In recent 15+ years, Archimandrite Deiniol performed extraordinary studies regarding Welsh Orthodox saints.
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« Reply #21 on: November 24, 2007, 10:18:33 PM »

I had Thanksgiving dinner in a garage out in the Arizonian desert with a devoted dirt biking / off road racing family who do like Jagermeister...and found out I am indeed getting old.

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« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2007, 07:24:10 PM »

God bless !

St. Walburga the Myrrh-streaming:



Icons of St. Walburga the Myrrh-Streaming, Abbess of Heidenheim in Germany

Feast: March 1

Daughter of St. Richard of Wessex and Winna (sister of St. Boniface, apostle of Germany), St. Walburga was the sister of Sts. Winebald and Willibald. Brought up by the abbess of Wimborne in England, Walburga was sent to Germany with St. Lioba by Abbess Tetta of Wimborne in 748. When their ship foundered at sea, the prayers of Sister Walburga rescued the lives of everyone, and till this day she, along with St. Nicholas, is a patron of sailors. She passed through Antwerp on her way to Germany, and to this day is the patroness of the city. In fact, the use of the Church of Antwerp was to celebrate her feast four times a year. She was soon appointed abbess of Heidenheim. Her gentleness, silence, learning, and humility rendered her beloved unto all. Sept. 21, 870, her relics were solemnly translated. Since 893 until the present, her incorrupt relics give off a sweet rosy dew or myrrh, especially from the breast, near her heart. 
 
List of german orthodox Saints in russian:

http://www.orthodoxia.de/German_Saints.htm


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« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2007, 02:27:54 PM »

God bless !



Icon of Our Holy Mother Lucy of Syracuse

Feast: December 13

St. Lucy was born of noble parents in Syracuse, Sicily. When she refused marriage to a suitor during Diocletian's persecution of Christians, he denounced her as a believer. The governor sentenced her to be defiled in a brothel, but after she prayed she became fixed with an immense weight by the power of the Holy Spirit, so that no number of men was able to budge her from her spot. She was condemned to the flames, but the flames did not harm her. Finally, she was stabbed in the throat with a dagger and so she gave her spirit up to God. Holy Martyr Lucy, pray to God for us!

A special custom on St. Lucia's day in Sweden:

On December 13th, one of the shortest days of winter, girls in Sweden dress up as Santa Lucia wearing a white dress and a crown of candles . Boys carry a candle and wear a kind of white pyjama. They wear hats that are pointy with golden stars on them.

In big cities in Sweden there are beauty contests where some women dress up as Santa Lucia and the judges and the people vote for the Santa Lucia of the year. In schools people sing Santa Lucia's song.

Saint Lucia was a saint because of her kindness and her love. She was an Italian Christian who lived in Sicily in the 4th century. Some people believe she once visited Sweden. December 13th is also her feast day.



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« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2007, 02:56:34 PM »

God bless !

St. Musa the child-confessor of old Rome:

Icon of St. Musa:

http://www.allmercifulsavior.com/icons/Icons-Musa.htm

St. Gregory the great:

One night, Musa had a Vision in which the Most Holy Mother of God appeared to her, surrounded by a bevy of girls her own age, wearing white dresses. The Virgin insisted that  Musa join them. At first Musa did not dare to do so, but the Virgin asked her again if she wanted to join them and enter her service. Then Musa answered that she did want to.
The Mother of God ordered her to stop giving herself over to futile and childish things and to prepare herself because, thirty days hence, She would come back to take her into Her service, together with the Virgins who accompanied Her.

After this Vision, St. Musa appeared completely transformed, to the astonishment of her parents, who no longer saw in her a silly and childish little girl but a person full of seriousness and maturity. When questioned about this sudden transformation, Musa explained how the Mother of God had appeared to her and asked her to enter Her service, naming also the day on which she was to come back.

Then, twenty-five days after the apparition, Musa fell ill with a fever. On the thirtieth day, when she was about to die, she saw the Virgin once more, and the maidens with Her. The Mother of God called her; and Musa answered reverently lowereing her eyes, and said in a clear voice:" Here I am, Lady, I come! Here I am, Lady ! In the same breath, she delivered up her spirit and left her virginal body to dwell with the Holy Virgins.


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« Reply #25 on: June 11, 2014, 08:24:47 PM »

Is Severinus of Noricum an Orthodox Saint? Wikipedia doesn't have him as an Orthodox Saint.
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« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2014, 08:45:50 PM »

Is Severinus of Noricum an Orthodox Saint? Wikipedia doesn't have him as an Orthodox Saint.

Orthodoxwiki has him listed here under January 8th: "Saint Severinus of Noricum, monk of Göttweig Abbey, enlightener of Noricum Ripensis (482)."
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« Reply #27 on: June 12, 2014, 12:42:34 AM »

Western Orthodox Saints are one of my favorite topics by far! Cheesy Did you know my username is named after St. Agapetus/Amator?

Also St. Olaus II is one of my favorite kings.
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« Reply #28 on: June 12, 2014, 09:11:27 AM »

Portuguese Orthodox Saints


St. James, brother of St. John, initiated the apostolic mission in the Iberic Peninsula (of course, at that time Portugal or Spain did not exist as such yet). According to the website "Orthodox England", the Archdiocese of St. James of Compostela would be a legitimate Apostolic See, which would have been stated by the local Archbishop against the rise of Roman interference supported by the Franks.

St. Peter, Archbishop of Braga (April 26)
Saint James, one of the apostles of Christ, visited the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula in 44 AD. One of his alleged visits occurred at Serra de Rates, in the current municipality of Póvoa de Varzim. During his visit, the apostle is said to have ordained the local Peter of Rates as the first bishop of Braga. This is probably a myth, given that it is proven that Saint James was celebrating Easter in Jerusalem precisely in this year.
It is believed that Saint Peter of Rates was beheaded while converting believers of the Roman religion to the Christian faith.
(Fabio's note: The text is from Wikipedia. The fact that St. James was in Jerusalem that year just suggests that the years attributed to his visits are wrong, not that he never went there).

The very first Orthodox saint born in pre-Portuguese lands was St. Basil, Bishop of Braga. (May 23)

Soon after him, St. Paul, St. Heracleus, St. Secondilla and St.Januarius of Oporto found holiness in Christ. (March 02 for all three)

St.Verissimus, St.Maxima and St. Julia of Lisbon - These martyrs under Diocletian are remembered with a full office in the Mozarabic breviary (Benedictines, Encyclopedia). (October 01)


St. Victor of Braga - In his chronicle, Vasaeus records that Saint Victor was baptized by blood. The catechumen was beheaded at Braga, Portugal, under Diocletian for refusing to sacrifice to idols (Benedictines, Husenbeth).(April 12)

St. Damasus, Orthodox Pope of the Roman Church, who witnessed the leigitimization of the Church by the Roman Empire and he is the one who charged St. Jeronominus of translating the Bible to "modern Latin", thus creating the "Vulgata Latina".

After the martyrs of the Pagan Roman Empire, we have the martyrs of the Arian Germanic Invaders.

St. Mancius, Bishop of Evora (March 15) Saint Mancius seems to have been bought as a slave by Jewish traders and taken to Evora, Portugal, where he was martyred by his masters (Benedictines).

Then came the great monastic father of Portugal, St. Martin, called of Braga, Bracarense and of Dume. Known as the Apostle of Galicia, he converted the Suevs from Arianism to Orthodoxy and translated to local languages, with the aid of his disciple Pascasius, the "Sayings of the Desert Fathers", which were in Greek. Also due to St. Martin, Portuguese is the only romance language in which weekdays do not have the names of pagan Gods. (March 20)

Another great monastic father is St. Frutuosus of Braga (665), enlightener of the Visigoths and author of a monastic rule. His relics can still be visited in Montélios, near Braga, in a 7th century church. (April 16)


In the period of the conquer by the Moors, a lengend was created about seven bishops who escaped to an island known as Island of the Seven Cities, a legend that is very symbolic of the loss of Orthodoxy, since Portugal would emerge from that period as Frank-Roman country.

One of the saints to meet martyrdom in the Moor invasion was St. Senhorinha (982). She was a relative os the Spanish St. Rodesinus of Mondoñedo and was abbess of the Conventof Basto, near Braga. In times of hunger she would pray and flour would miracously appear in the convent. To her was also granted the grace of having water turned into wine during her prayers a great display of the Glory of the first author of such miracle in her. (April 22)

Another one was St. Torquadus who eventually became Archbishop in Braga, in Oporto and in Dume. In 711, Mussa, a Muslim general was sent by Tarik, the conqueror of the Iberic Peninsula to subdue and convert the local people. St. Torquadus went to meet him along with 27 followers, facing the entire Moor army. Using his word, he preached to the entire Moor army. Enraged, the Muslim general killed St. Torquadus by the sword. Later the body of the saint was found in the wood and where he was moved a spring emerged at that point. This spring still exists today and is known as "Fonte de São Torcato". A sanctuary was built there where the body of the saint can be visited. (February 26)

Other Portuguese saints are:

St Amador, the hermit – (March 27)

St Apolonius and St Leoncius – (March 19)

St Irene – (653). She was a beautiful young monk and was a "martyr of the lust" for she was killed by men who desired her and could not accept her refusal. A boy from the village wanted her for him as did the abbot of a male monastery nearby. Succumbing to the passions, the abbot made people believe the young chaste ascetic was already pregnant. She was expelled from her monastery. Knowing of this the boy from the village killed her out of jelousy and frustrated passion. (October 20)


All Saints of Portugal and Spirtual Fathers and Mothers of the Portuguese language, pray for us!


The see of Braga, once the Orthodox spiritual heart of Portugal, had a Liturgy of its own, the "Ritus Bracarensis" or "Rito Bracarense" in Portugal, which they still perform there. Here is the Liturgy of Braga (in Latin):

http://ffyl.uncu.edu.ar/departamentos/filosofia/centros/cefim/Missale%20Bracarense.pdf
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« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2014, 09:12:19 AM »

Another Orthodox Portuguese of interest, who was not a saint, was Fr. Paulo Orosius who fought the heresy of the Prisciallinists and the Pelagians.

Here is what Wikipedia have on him:

Paulus Orosius (b. circa 375, d. 418?) was a Christian historian, theologian and disciple of Augustine of Hippo from Gallaecia. He is best known for his Historiarum Adversum Paganos Libri VII ("Seven Books of History Against the Pagans"), which he wrote in response to the belief that the decline of the Roman Empire was the result of its adoption of Christianity.

After entering the priesthood, he took an interest in the Priscillianist controversy then going on in his native country. He went to consult with Augustine at Hippo (now Annaba in Algeria) in 413 or 414, possibly in connection with this controversy. After staying for some time in North Africa as Augustine's disciple, he was reportedly sent by him in 415 to Palestine with a letter of introduction to Jerome, then living in Bethlehem.

The ostensible purpose of his mission (apart from the typical intent of pilgrimage and perhaps relic-hunting) was that he might gain further instruction from Jerome on the points raised by the Priscillianists and Origenists. In reality, it would seem that his business was to assist Jerome and others against Pelagius, who, after the synod of Carthage in 411, had been living in Palestine, and finding some acceptance there.

After his arrival. John II, bishop of Jerusalem, was induced to summon a synod in June 415 at which Orosius communicated the decisions of Carthage and read several of Augustine's writings against Pelagius. Success, however, was not achieved among Greeks who did not understand Latin, and whose sense of reverence was unshocked by Pelagius's famous question, Et quis est mihi Augustinus? ("Who is Augustine to me?") Orosius succeeded only in obtaining John's consent to send letters and deputies to Pope Innocent I of Rome; and, after having waited long enough to learn the unfavourable decision of the synod of Diospolis (Lydda) in December of the same year, he returned to north Africa, where he is believed to have died. According to Gennadius, he carried with him relics of the protomartyr Stephen from Palestine to Minorca, where they were reported to be useful in attempts to convert members of the Jewish community to Christianity.

The earliest work of Orosius, Consultatio sive commonitorium ad Augustinum de errore Priscillianistarum et Origenistarum, explains its object by its title; it was written soon after his arrival in Africa, and is usually printed in the works of Augustine along with the reply of the latter, Contra Priscillianistas et Origenistas liber ad Orosium.

His next treatise, Liber apologeticus de arbitrii libertate, was written during his stay in Palestine, and in connection with the controversy which engaged him there. It is a keen but not always fair criticism of the Pelagian position from that of Augustine.

The Historiae adversum paganos was undertaken at the suggestion of Augustine, to whom it is dedicated. Orosius argues that the world has improved since the introduction of Christianity rather than declined as others had argued. In response to those who pointed to contemporary disasters, he simply argues out that previous ones occurring before Christianity were much worse. The work, a universal history of the calamities that have happened to mankind from the fall down to about 417, was the first attempt to write the history of the world as a history of God guiding humanity. Its purpose gave it value in the eyes of the orthodox, and the Hormesta (or Ormesta, Ormista) as it was called—no one knows why—speedily attained a wide popularity. Nearly two hundred manuscripts of it have survived. An abridged, free translation by King Alfred is still extant. Bono Giamboni translated it in Italian language. A still unpublished 14th century Aragonese translation, made by Domingo de García Martín at the request of Juan Fernández de Heredia, comes from Bono Giamboni's Italian translation. The history of Orosius was translated also into Arabic during the reign of al-Hakam II of Córdoba. It later became one of the sources of Ibn Khaldun in his history.

The sources Orosius used have been investigated by T. de Morner; besides the Old and New Testaments, he appears to have consulted Caesar, Livy, Justin, Tacitus, Suetonius, Florus and a cosmography, attaching also great value to Jerome's translation of the Chronicles of Eusebius.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orosius
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Holy Martyr Afra, pray to God for us!


« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2014, 09:42:55 AM »

The tomb of Saint Afra of Augsburg is in the crypt of the RC Basilica of Saints Ulrich and Afra. My wife prays there quite often.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/48/St._Ulrich_und_St._Afra_%28Augsburg%29_15.JPG/1280px-St._Ulrich_und_St._Afra_%28Augsburg%29_15.JPG

Our local congregation serves a moleben there I think every August when the RCC brings the relics up from the crypt:

http://www.rocor-augsburg.de/galereja/2013/7/1.jpg

http://www.rocor-augsburg.de/galereja/2013/7/8.jpg
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