Author Topic: Epistle introduction  (Read 2334 times)

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Offline tuesdayschild

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Epistle introduction
« on: July 16, 2008, 09:42:56 PM »
When the epistle is introduced by the reader, he says:

"In those days..." for Acts,
"Brethren..." for most of the Pauline letters,
"My son, Timothy..." for those to Timothy, and
"Beloved..." for 1, 2, and 3 John. 

What if Paul is addressing Titus or Philemon?  What about the epistles of Peter, James and Jude? 

Does "Brethren..." cover these, too?

 ???

Offline Fr. George

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2008, 10:08:50 PM »
I'd have to get an epistle book out to check (it's at church), however I think "Brethren" is probably the default.
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
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Offline PeterTheAleut

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2008, 10:17:42 PM »
What if Paul is addressing Titus or Philemon?
I believe the rule you stated for opening a reading from one of the epistles to Timothy also applies to Titus and Philemon:  "My son ..."
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Offline tuesdayschild

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2008, 10:42:41 PM »
...I think "Brethren" is probably the default.

...also applies to Titus and Philemon:  "My son ..."

Both those answers make perfect sense, which is I thought I had better ask.  You just never know about these things.  ;D

Offline Rosehip

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2008, 10:48:58 PM »
Oh-THAT explains why the priest always begins the Gospel reading with "Vo vremya Ionna" ("In the days of John"? Is my translation correct?)!

I have puzzled over this for sooo long and have always forgot to ask about it...
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Offline LBK

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2008, 12:23:22 AM »
Rosehip, Vo vremya ono means at that time, or, as often written in liturgical texts in English, in those days. It has nothing to do with John (Ioann). The Greek equivalent is to kairo ekeino.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2008, 12:23:50 AM by LBK »
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Offline Rosehip

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2008, 09:51:31 AM »
Rosehip, Vo vremya ono means at that time, or, as often written in liturgical texts in English, in those days. It has nothing to do with John (Ioann). The Greek equivalent is to kairo ekeino.

Thanks so much for clearing up that mystery!
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Offline ytterbiumanalyst

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2008, 01:45:08 PM »
In the Liturgy, the Epistle is always prefaced by "Brethren" whenever it is addressed to an entire Church, especially if we only read a passage in the middle of a letter. It serves as a sort of mini-introduction to the letter. I would expect that when an Epistle is addressed only to one person, we would use an introduction that indicates such.

This is what I know from memory; after Sunday I can have a better answer.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2008, 01:51:28 PM by ytterbiumanalyst »
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Offline Fr. George

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2008, 04:05:16 PM »
Here we go (I found our Epistle book in English here at the Church... if anyone has a question, I can double-check it in the Greek):

When the reading begins with the first verse of the first chapter of one of the Epistles (Pascha: Acts 1:1-8, for example), then the text is read verbatim with no additions.  I have not seen an exception to this rule, so I place it first.

Acts:  In addition to the standard "in those days," one may also find "about that time" (Sat before Samaritan Woman), and also the verbatim beginning of Ch 2 on Pentecost Sunday ("When the day of Pentecost had come").

Paul's General letters: "Brethren"

Paul to Timothy: "My son Timothy"

Paul to Titus: "My son Titus."

James: The reading on Thursday of the 31st week starts "My beloved brethren," but the others say "brethren."

Peter: "Beloved."

John: "Brethren" for some and "Beloved" for others.

Jude: "Beloved"

Some curve-balls:

Sep 13th (dedication of the Church of the Holy Resurrection): "Holy Brethren" (Hebrews 3:1-4)
Sep 26th (repose of St. John the Theologian): verbatim beginning of 1 John 4:12-19
Aug 6 (Transfiguration): "Brethren" for 2 Peter 1:10-19
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
Met. Meletios of Nikopolis & Preveza, from his ordination.

Offline tuesdayschild

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2008, 04:30:00 PM »
Here we go...

Bookmarked for future reference.  Thanks, Cleveland!

Offline Deacon Lance

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2008, 05:12:18 PM »
In addition to the above, my instructions say these readings have special introductions rather than the normal ones:

Paul to Philemon - Philemon, my son
James 4:7 - Beloved
1 Peter 1:3 - Brethren
1 Peter 5:6 - Brethren
1 Peter 1:10 - Brethren
1 John 2:18 - My children
« Last Edit: July 17, 2008, 05:14:03 PM by Deacon Lance »
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Offline Basil 320

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2008, 11:27:58 PM »
Thanks very much cleveland, for your Reply #8.  I'm printing it and placing it in my Church's Epistle Readings book, which had been published by Holy Cross, 25+ years ago.  I have found little, if any rubrics for the Byzantine style, in the English language and I don't read Greek.  I have never understood why no one, not even the Holy Archdiocese, translates the service books into English as they are written in Greek, rather than just publishing the services the publisher chooses to publish.
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Offline ytterbiumanalyst

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2008, 12:40:29 PM »
Thank you, Cleveland. This is very useful information.
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Offline pensateomnia

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2008, 08:24:19 PM »
Thanks very much cleveland, for your Reply #8.  I'm printing it and placing it in my Church's Epistle Readings book, which had been published by Holy Cross, 25+ years ago.  I have found little, if any rubrics for the Byzantine style, in the English language and I don't read Greek.  I have never understood why no one, not even the Holy Archdiocese, translates the service books into English as they are written in Greek, rather than just publishing the services the publisher chooses to publish.

As far as I remember, every copy of the Apostolos that Holy Cross has printed in the last 10 years has been translated from the ecclesiastical texts -- and thus has the proper introductions. In fact, I imagine that's where cleveland found the info.

If your old copy doesn't have the right stuff, might be time to purchase a new one: http://store.holycrossbookstore.com/apostolos.html
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Offline Fr. George

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Re: Epistle introduction
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2008, 10:58:35 PM »
As far as I remember, every copy of the Apostolos that Holy Cross has printed in the last 10 years has been translated from the ecclesiastical texts -- and thus has the proper introductions. In fact, I imagine that's where cleveland found the info. 

Bingo.
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
Met. Meletios of Nikopolis & Preveza, from his ordination.