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Author Topic: I am not a personality worshipper, Bishops and Priests  (Read 3452 times) Average Rating: 0
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Irenaeus07
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« on: July 01, 2008, 08:12:12 AM »

Greetings,

Our Bishop has visited our parish several times since I've been a catechumen.  I remember the first time I met the Bishop, my priest was very excited and said, our bishop is here.  And I kind of just looked at him.

The thing is, I am not a personality worshopper.  He is bishop, that is fine, and I understand his place in the church, but I am not going to jump for joy just because he visit. I think my reaction is related to the fact that I met some many corrupt people in high religious position that, for me, a person has to earn my respect, he doesn't get it simply because he has the title.

Is this bad manners or an inappropiate for me to respond as such to my priest when he mentions the Bishop???

What about kissing the hand of the priests? Is it bad manners not to do so?


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Thomas
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2008, 08:49:12 AM »

The role of the Bishop is like that of your Father.  He is the Father of the Diocese.  My bishop often calls the Diocese his family.  I suppose how one feels about a visit from a bishop  who usually only comes once a year in the US to visit a parish , would be the same response that you might have if you had not seen your father in over a year and he  called you and said he would visit---in my case I was always excited when my father visited me  coming several  thousand miles to see me---such is the case for many bishops who often travel as much as 1,000+ miles to see their local parishes.

I understand especially your priest's excitement.  A priest's job is a very lonely one as any wife of a priest will tell you. He has no one in the parish that he can really discuss personal issues with, no one in the parish he can discuss his career with, no one in the parish he can go to for spiritual direction. Of course he is excited, this is the one time a year he has to sit down and talk privately and face to face with his bishop, about issues he can not discuss with parishioners or others.  he gets one-to-one direction on how to address issues, solve problems, and a frank evaluation of how he is doing as a priest. Any other time with his bishop he is surrounded by other priests, members of this council or that, or being joustled by other  Orthodox diocese members seeking the bishop's blessing at conferences. Otherwise for private discussion he has to call his bishop on the phone, and if my experience on the phone is like the priests, the phone is cold and you do not have that personal touch on the phone that you have in person---so of course your priest will be excited. You do not have to be excited, just be understanding why to him it is a special event or time.

----

As to kissing your priest's hand, it is proper etiquette to do so, moreover it is a way to ask for a personal blessing from a priest or bishop. Many converts and Catechumen not coming from a tradition where one asks for blessings from the clergy often feel uncomfortable with this at first, but eventually as they become more comfortable with the tradition they often embrace it more fully than do some cradle Orthodox.

An article at http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/clergy_etiquette.aspx puts it this way "a lay person kisses the hand of a Priest or Bishop is to show respect to his Apostolic office. More importantly, however, since both hold the Holy Mysteries in their hands during the Divine Liturgy, we show respect to the Holy Eucharist when we kiss their hands. In fact, Saint John Chrysostomos once said that if one were to meet an Orthodox Priest walking along with an Angel, that he should greet the Priest first and kiss his hand, since that hand has touched the Body and Blood of our Lord. For this latter reason, we do not normally kiss the hand of a Deacon. While a Deacon in the Orthodox Church holds the first level of the Priesthood (Deacon, Presbyter, Bishop), his service does not entail blessing the Mysteries. When we take leave of a Priest or Bishop, we should again ask for a blessing, just as we did when we first greeted him."  Some  jurisdictions and traditions emphasize it more than others and some priests in the US feel uncomfortable when it is done but ,many others expect it.  When in doubt, place your right hand over the left (palms upward), and say: "Bless, Father" (or "Bless, Your Grace," or "Bless, Your Eminence," etc.) and see how they respond. Most will give you a blessing  "May the Lord bless you," bless you with the Sign of the Cross, and places his right hand in your hands. It is at that point that you kiss his hand.

Hope this answers some of your questions.

Thomas


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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2008, 09:12:56 AM »

^^I agree with the above. When a bishop or a priest happen to be people with a special gift - communication or otherwise - it´s double joy I think, because we also rejoice for the person in a more personal way. But our joy emanates from the presence of our spiritual father, the protection, light and blessing his presence sheds by the Grace of the Holy Spirit. This is what makes the person of the bishop or the priest so special, the Grace of God.
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2008, 07:22:46 PM »

The idea that we should only respect clergy who have "earned" our respect could actually be a differerent form of the heresy of Donatism.
Donatism was the heresy which taught that the validity of the Mysteries of the Church depended on the character of the minister. In other words, Donatism holds that a morally corrupt priest's Divine Liturgy is ineffectual. In the Orthodox Church, no matter who a priest or Bishop is, it is their role in the Church which is considered important and is respected. To refuse to kiss a priest's hand or bow before the Bishop unless they "earn" your respect is Donatism. We kiss the hand which consecrates the Eucharist and confers blessing, and we bow before the one who binds and looses.
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2008, 07:31:35 PM »

^ Well I don't have a problem with kissing someone hands or bowing before them per se.  But am I suppose to feel overly joy because a bishop arrives, just because he is a bishop.

I understand we are suppose to respect, the bishop and priest, but to extend is required???
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« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2008, 09:45:31 PM »

^ Well I don't have a problem with kissing someone hands or bowing before them per se.  But am I suppose to feel overly joy because a bishop arrives, just because he is a bishop.

I understand we are suppose to respect, the bishop and priest, but to extend is required???



God Bless you Brother....   A serbian Muslim told me he liked the way we respected our clergy by kissing there right hand...I mentioned to him they are successors from the apostles plus they consecrate the holy mysteries...
  then i asked him about their Hodja's imam's do they respect them he said no ,,not like the way we respect our clergy... he would like to see greater respect for them though....As a former muslim maybe you can fill me in on the respect of the imam's ,,maybe it's different from islamic country to country.....SmileyCentral.com" border="0
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« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2008, 10:23:00 PM »



God Bless you Brother....   A serbian Muslim told me he liked the way we respected our clergy by kissing there right hand...I mentioned to him they are successors from the apostles plus they consecrate the holy mysteries...
  then i asked him about their Hodja's imam's do they respect them he said no ,,not like the way we respect our clergy... he would like to see greater respect for them though....As a former muslim maybe you can fill me in on the respect of the imam's ,,maybe it's different from islamic country to country.....SmileyCentral.com" border="0

In Islam it is called Adab, loosely translated as manners, but means the proper way to do things.  So there are proper manners with everything in Islam, but they aren't necessarily obligatory.

Most of the Muslims who practice manners with imams and shaykhs are usually those associated with a spiritual path (tariqa - tasawwuf). 90% of the spiritual path is manners.

So we sould kiss the hands of known spiritual masters, and our teachers, and imams.

Some manners we give to our shaykh.

If he walks into a room where we are sitting, we immediately stand up and remain silent.  We may kiss his hands when we greet him, but we kiss the hands of all those of the spiritual path when we greet them as well.  Some Spiritual masters will sometimes withdraw their hands when we try to kiss them, because they feel they are not worthy to be kissed.  There are many books written on manners.  The proper manners with shaykh, Imams, the believers, with non-Muslims, books, with everything.

But there are manners for everything.

We don't place books of sacred knowledge on the floor, unless it is stacked in a neat pile, or unless there no other place to put it.  We would for example lean the book against the wall not on the floor.

Some spiritual master require that we even show respect to pens, and that we do not get disposable pens, because pens are used to record scared knowledge.

My previous spiritual master use to say, Your inability to regard anything as sacred is your inability to travel the spiritual path.

My spiritual master use to say, you are not respecting me, but what I indicate, ie sacred knowledge, a transmitter of scared knowledge.

But at any rate there isn't a universal rule in Islam per se says that Imams have to have their hands kiss or anything like that.

So I use to kiss the hand of my previous spiritual master.  But I did not kiss the hand of my previous imam, because I didn't regard him as a man of knowledge.  He was a hypocrite.  When I first met, my previous imam, I was impressed with him, but as I begin to study Islamic knowledge with real scholars, such as my spiritual master, and with other scholars.  I began to realize how ignorant he was, and his hypocrisy became more and more manifest.  That man was evil.  The things he use to say, he use to make me so angry. He use to mulipulate Islamic teachings with faulty reasoning. And then would expect me to accept it. He had alot of Islamic information but he had no knowledge.  And he has a masters degree in Islamic studies.

Anyway, that was a rant wasn't it.
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« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2008, 10:47:22 PM »

Thank You Brother for your reply.....Turkey brought islam to the balkan's the word Hodja is a trukish word for imam...unless other islamic country's use that word too....i don't know...
 What made you decide to convert to christianity  especially orthodox christianity. just curious about ....
 i have a macadonian albainian muslim friend named Ramadam he told me in his village in macadonia on there mosque there is a cross on it there imam had people trying to remove it many many times,,they do succeed removing it each time but it continually reappears again on top of the mosque,,he said they finally gave up trying to remove it ,,the imam said it must be God's will.....SmileyCentral.com" border="0
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« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2008, 12:00:50 AM »

I go out of my way to avoid my Metropolitan; Sounds sad, doesn't it?   Embarrassed  He came to my Church twice in 2008.  The first time, I attended an OCA Church.  The second time, I slept in.  He's a good Hierarch for those who are native-born Greeks.  Even though He was born in Astoria (NYC), I perceive that He's so out of touch with the Greek-American generation.  My Metropolitan shows up for the opening of His Folk Dancing Festival and His Chancellor celebrates the Divine Liturgy on the following day.

My Metropolitan is not well liked by the majority of lay people due to some controversy surrounding an Epiphany event.  To make things worse, He could be the next Patriarch after Patriarch Bartholomew.   Cry

Edited for content and clarity.
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Irenaeus07
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« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2008, 12:04:42 AM »

^  In short, I was attracted to spirituality of Orthodox Christianity. And the rest is history.

Because of my traditional background of Islam, of all the Christian sects, it would be almost impossible for me to become anything except Orthodox Christianity, because protestant Christians do not have a golden chain back to Jesus.
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« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2008, 02:07:19 AM »

^  In short, I was attracted to spirituality of Orthodox Christianity. And the rest is history.

Because of my traditional background of Islam, of all the Christian sects, it would be almost impossible for me to become anything except Orthodox Christianity, because protestant Christians do not have a golden chain back to Jesus.


Again thank you Brother...

Forgive all these question"s  ,,did your look into the latin church as well before accepting eastern orthodoxy again just curious......God's Peace........SmileyCentral.com" border="0
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« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2008, 07:31:26 AM »

But am I suppose to feel overly joy because a bishop arrives, just because he is a bishop.

You probably don't share your priest's joy because you don't know the Bishop personally. Don't worry about it. Over the years, I've come to know two of my Bishop's personally, and one is a dear friend who shares my love of bee keeping since he was a bee keeper in his monastery before becoming a Bishop (and he likes my favourite cognac!)
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« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2008, 09:40:44 AM »

My Metropolitan is not well liked by the majority of lay people due to some controversy surrounding an Epiphany event.  To make things worse, He could be the next Patriarch after Patriarch Bartholomew.   Cry


Don't worry, he was born in America and doesn't have his Turkish citizenship so he isn't eligible. It also won't be a Athenegorios situation because he doesn't have that kind of support.
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« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2008, 11:03:14 AM »

I think the original poster brings up a good point. While I would agree it is important to show respect for one's bishop (kissing his hand, showing him hospitality while he visits, etc.) I have seen some who do worship the position or in some cases the personality. Perhaps others have seen folks who are hangers on, groupies or those who like to look important by being seen with the bishop, the holy monk,  or a well-known priest etc. It is healthy to maintain perspective in the way we view our clergy. Anyone in the clergy could fall away from the true faith. In Protestant churches folks will come and go if their favorite pastor leaves because it is all about the personality. I guess as long as we remember who is the head of the church we won't be in danger of being swept away by an unhealthy view of the office or by a charismatic clerical personality. When our bishop comes for a visit it we prepare for it like we would for a visit from a family member. He comes often enough that we have developed a familial relationship with him so that we see him as a real person and not just a figure head. Hopefully, in the future we will have enough bishops so all of the laity will have that kind of a relationship with their bishop.
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« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2008, 11:19:02 PM »


Again thank you Brother...

Forgive all these question"s  ,,did your look into the latin church as well before accepting eastern orthodoxy again just curious......God's Peace........SmileyCentral.com" border="0

There is no way I can be catholic.  I don't care for the pope, but I do like catholics, in fact, I am going to a Catholic mass tomorrow morning at a catholic monastery.  The monks there are pretty cool.

However while studying the origins of Orthodoxy, I was wondering if catholics were first and orthodox came second.  If catholics were first, i don't think I would have considered being christian.

I don't like the new pope.  Sometimes you just have a feeling about people.  And I just don't like him.

And I am not a personality worshipper.
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« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2008, 11:32:19 PM »

There is no way I can be catholic.  I don't care for the pope, but I do like catholics, in fact, I am going to a Catholic mass tomorrow morning at a catholic monastery.  The monks there are pretty cool.

However while studying the origins of Orthodoxy, I was wondering if catholics were first and orthodox came second.  If catholics were first, i don't think I would have considered being christian.

I don't like the new pope.  Sometimes you just have a feeling about people.  And I just don't like him.

And I am not a personality worshipper.


Orthodoxy is older and traditional which i like....i agree.... i don't like any of the popes after the 1000 year seperation

or this german one .....SmileyCentral.com" border="0But the catholic people are alright ..again i agree
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« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2008, 12:38:41 AM »

When our bishop comes for a visit it we prepare for it like we would for a visit from a family member. He comes often enough that we have developed a familial relationship with him so that we see him as a real person and not just a figure head. Hopefully, in the future we will have enough bishops so all of the laity will have that kind of a relationship with their bishop.

My Metropolitan requires a $1,000 (probably higher) minimum contribution, 5 star hotel accomodations and dinners at expensive restaurants when he visits my local Church.  Before the 1950's, the Archbishop and other Hierarchs would debark at a nearby train station 4 blocks from the Church and probably stayed at a parishioner's residence.  Wow, how times have changed....   Shocked

I hope your family members do not make such extreme requests when they visit you.   Wink
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« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2008, 12:48:46 AM »

My Metropolitan requires a $1,000 (probably higher) minimum contribution, 5 star hotel accomodations and dinners at expensive restaurants when he visits my local Church.  Before the 1950's, the Archbishop and other Hierarchs would debark at a nearby train station 4 blocks from the Church and probably stayed at a parishioner's residence.  Wow, how times have changed....   Shocked

I hope your family members do not make such extreme requests when they visit you.   Wink

Uh no, we don't have that problem.  Wink We treat him like a family member and he still eats like a monk. He stays at a  reasonably priced hotel and our priest drives him to and from the airport. Hopefully in time, the Greek bishops will scale back on their lavish lifestyle.
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« Reply #18 on: July 04, 2008, 12:53:43 AM »

Uh no, we don't have that problem.  Wink We treat him like a family member and he still eats like a monk. He stays at a  reasonably priced hotel and our priest drives him to and from the airport. Hopefully in time, the Greek bishops will scale back on their lavish lifestyle.

From what I've seen from the Antiochians, their Hierarchs are more humble although they have a suggested contribution for visits vs. a mandatory contribution.

I can't say if the other 8 GOA Hierarchs are like my Metropolitan.  I'm aware that other GOA Metropolitans have minimum contribution requests to the Metropolitan see and some other project, usually the summer camp.
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« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2008, 01:37:15 AM »

From what I've seen from the Antiochians, their Hierarchs are more humble although they have a suggested contribution for visits vs. a mandatory contribution.
Our diocesan hierarchs get very little money from the archdiocese. The diocesan churches have to help support them.

Quote
I can't say if the other 8 GOA Hierarchs are like my Metropolitan.  I'm aware that other GOA Metropolitans have minimum contribution requests to the Metropolitan see and some other project, usually the summer camp.
From what I have been told by some of my Greek-American buddies, most of the Metropolitans in the GOA live a fairly opulent lifestyle for a cleric.
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« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2008, 02:08:36 AM »

From what I have been told by some of my Greek-American buddies, most of the Metropolitans in the GOA live a fairly opulent lifestyle for a cleric.

Pretty bold gossip, hearsay actually. But then I don't want to go off on another OCL-rant.
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« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2008, 03:03:34 AM »

I cannot speak for the other metropolitan bishops of the jurisdiction in which I am under, but the metropolitan in whose metropolis I am under is a very spiritual man.  He recently visited my parish, which was experiencing an administrative disagreement with him.  Just his mere presence calmed our senses.  He is truly "God-Chosen."  I do not say this because I feel compelled to, due to my Faith's understanding of the episcopacy.  Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (GOAA) hierarchs may be earning descent salaries, though they do not earn salaries anywhere near the "scale" set forth for the priests, though, combined with the honoraria they receive, they might.  Yet, I cannot in anyway characterize my bishop's life style as "opulent."  Let's not critically generalize about how the GOAA bishops live. It probably has to do with their own spiritual being and what they do with their income.  I can recall a routine audit of our parish finances which revealed our bishop had not cashed the check which our parish had given him 8 months earlier.

I understand the difference, though.  I can recall one of his predecessors, an auxiliary to one of the former Archbishops of America, who I perceived as an administrator; whose spirituality did not move me.

I would also submit, from what I do know of the general living conditions of the other GOAA hierarchs, rather than "opulent," I would say, they are comfortable.  There's nothing wrong with that.  For all the issues that need to be addressed in the GOAA, the living conditions of the metropolitans is not one of them.  While I'm very supportive of Archbishop Demetrios' ministry, the only criticism of him in my assessment, is the cost associated with maintaining an apartment for him in Manhattan, when the Archdiocesan Headquarters has living quarters which were sufficient for the late Archbishops Athenagoras; Michael and for 10plus years of Archbishop Iakovos' tenure, all of Thrice Blessed Memory.  The Cathedral Towers, owned by the Archdiocesan Cathedral, likewise contains a living quarters which would adequately serve the archbishop's needs.

As to "kissing the bishop's hand," remember, it is not due to personality; we also kiss a bishop's and priest's right hand out of respect for a hand that blesses us.  Likewise, the Church teaches that the bishop is the "Icon of Christ."  During censing, after the Sanctuary and the Icon Screen are censed, it is the Bishop's Throne, which is censed, in the Byzantine style churches.
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« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2008, 10:21:52 AM »

I cannot speak for the other metropolitan bishops of the jurisdiction in which I am under, but the metropolitan in whose metropolis I am under is a very spiritual man.  He recently visited my parish, which was experiencing an administrative disagreement with him.  Just his mere presence calmed our senses.  He is truly "God-Chosen."  I do not say this because I feel compelled to, due to my Faith's understanding of the episcopacy.  Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (GOAA) hierarchs may be earning descent salaries, though they do not earn salaries anywhere near the "scale" set forth for the priests, though, combined with the honoraria they receive, they might.  Yet, I cannot in anyway characterize my bishop's life style as "opulent."  Let's not critically generalize about how the GOAA bishops live. It probably has to do with their own spiritual being and what they do with their income...

I believe most bishops are good stewards of their honorariums.  A key to their spirit may be seen in what they do with their honorariums. One example is His Eminence Metropolitan Philip of the Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese who has used his saved honorarium's in this manner- In 1968, he established a $100,000 Trust Fund to provide scholarships to Arab refugees studying in the fields of science, medicine, economics and technology. In 1977, he established a $500,000 endowment fund for the support of the Orthodox Theological Academy of St. John of Damascus at Balamand Lebanon, the sole remaining Orthodox Seminary in the Middle East. In 2006, $250,000 to the Retired Clergy Fund, plus many other unheralded donations over the years.  His Grace Bishop Basil of the Diocese of Wichita and Mid-America uses many of his honorarium to establish missions, provide funds to struggling parishes, and covers his own expenses when visiting parishes of limited income. I am sure that there are many such stories with the Orthodox Bishops in the United States.

It is a blessing to be able to kiss the bishop's and priest's right hand out of respect for a hand that blesses us.  The examples of these bishops likewise show us what we should be doing with our own excess funds in aspect to themissions of the Church. 

Thomas

edited for additional information and spell checking.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2008, 10:24:51 AM by Thomas » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2008, 12:18:34 PM »

Pretty bold gossip, hearsay actually. But then I don't want to go off on another OCL-rant.

Its okay, go ahead and rant.Kiss Wink Because I did get this information from the fellows who were in OCL and what you say would be a fair assessment. But these guys seemed to know what they were talking about because they knew their bishops quite well. 

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« Reply #24 on: July 04, 2008, 02:23:42 PM »

His Grace Bishop Basil of the Diocese of Wichita and Mid-America uses many of his honorarium to establish missions, provide funds to struggling parishes, and covers his own expenses when visiting parishes of limited income. I am sure that there are many such stories with the Orthodox Bishops in the United States.

I suppose that my Metropolitan could be taken to a Diner where the dinners range from $10-$20 rather than a 5 star restaurant where the cost can be $100 a person.  The only difference is that one can have private and discreet conversations with the Metropolitan at a 5 star restaurant while the crowds at a Diner would observe the Metropolitan and probably wonder who he was.  I can't stand this unusual obsession with privacy and tactfulness and I won't even go into the security details present for Patriarchal visits (although I do realize that security details also cover other high profile figures, at public expense, in addition to the Patriarch).

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« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2008, 04:37:06 PM »

I recently returned to the Orthodox Church after 20+ years of being an evangelical. And regarding this matter of kissing the hand of our priests and our bishop, I have no problem with it, though I confess it was awkward for me at first. But I think it is an excellent thing, as a sign of respect for their apostolic office.

We're living in a world where there is in general very little respect for tradition - or for anything else - left anymore. I want my daughter to learn that we are to respect those in God-given authority over us. She is to respect me, I am to respect my priest, my priest is to respect our Bishop, etc. So I kiss the hand of my priest not only for my own spiritual edification but to set an example for my child as well.
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« Reply #26 on: July 22, 2008, 07:56:19 PM »

Uh no, we don't have that problem.  Wink We treat him like a family member and he still eats like a monk. He stays at a  reasonably priced hotel and our priest drives him to and from the airport. Hopefully in time, the Greek bishops will scale back on their lavish lifestyle.

My bishop is the same way.  He loves people and loves to sit among the people at the dinner after the hierarchical liturgy (forget a head table with him, Matushka and Father and the deacon.  He was sitting at our regular tables and people were welcome to come and sit with him and talk to him.  He was auxiliary bishop before our last bishop retired and lived at Raphael House.  Once, when one of the cooks got sick and they were short staffed, he pitched in and helped prepare the meal (he is a gourmet cook).  Our teens love him.  One told me he could have been a stand-up comedian. 
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« Reply #27 on: July 22, 2008, 09:08:12 PM »

Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (GOAA) hierarchs may be earning descent salaries, though they do not earn salaries anywhere near the "scale" set forth for the priests, though, combined with the honoraria they receive, they might.  Yet, I cannot in anyway characterize my bishop's life style as "opulent." 

Absolutely. It's not like the salaries are unknown. They are unremarkably middle class.

Of course, compared to just a generation ago, a middle class salary seems like luxury. Many of the retired GOA clergy (and a couple of the retired auxiliary Bishops) received compensation fit for a shift manager at a McDonalds for 40 years of ministry and now scrape by on limited pensions. That (and worse) is still the case in many other jurisdictions -- from necessity, not some kind of freely-chosen attempt to spiritualize the ministry.

As a side note: The canons actually forbid men in all three priestly orders from seeking employment outside of the Church, and therefore require laypeople to provide the clergy with their "firstfruits". If memory serves, it was St. Basil who wrote that the clergy should be compensated as are the most respected doctors and lawyers in the community, since we ought not pay more honor to secular leaders than to spiritual. We're FAR from either scenario.  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #28 on: July 22, 2008, 11:32:36 PM »

I recently returned to the Orthodox Church after 20+ years of being an evangelical. And regarding this matter of kissing the hand of our priests and our bishop, I have no problem with it, though I confess it was awkward for me at first. But I think it is an excellent thing, as a sign of respect for their apostolic office.

We're living in a world where there is in general very little respect for tradition - or for anything else - left anymore. I want my daughter to learn that we are to respect those in God-given authority over us. She is to respect me, I am to respect my priest, my priest is to respect our Bishop, etc. So I kiss the hand of my priest not only for my own spiritual edification but to set an example for my child as well.



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