Author Topic: Commemoration of saints at dismissal  (Read 1024 times)

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Offline scamandrius

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Commemoration of saints at dismissal
« on: May 16, 2008, 11:08:16 PM »
At the dismissal ("May Christ our True God who arose from the dead...")of Great Vespers and the Liturgy for a typical Sunday, I've noticed our priest usually commemorates only one saint, especially if that saint had three or four prosomia in his/her memory at "Lord, I have Cried."  Is this the typical practice?  I ask because when we have another priest to serve Vespers or the Liturgy when our priest is out, he mentions almost every saint commemorated in the Menaion for that day along with who they were, when they lived.  Sometimes, it just seems too much.  Is there even a typical practice?  The substitute priest serves Liturgy according to the Slavic Typicon as we follow the Greek Typicon.  Is there a difference in the dismissal according to those two traditions? 

Thanks.
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Offline ytterbiumanalyst

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Re: Commemoration of saints at dismissal
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2008, 11:49:21 PM »
We use the Slavic, and we typically commemorate the Theotokos with Ss. Joachim and Anna, Seraphim of Sarov, Tikhon, Vladimir, John Kucharov, Thomas (our parish's patron), and the saint of the day.
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Offline arimethea

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Re: Commemoration of saints at dismissal
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2008, 09:39:30 AM »
he mentions almost every saint commemorated in the Menaion for that day along with who they were, when they lived.  Sometimes, it just seems too much.  Is there even a typical practice? 

Yes it is Typical. Some priest choose to mention every saint because this is the only time most people in a parish will hear who the Saints of the day are. It is not a Slavic vs. Greek practice but more of a pastoral choice.
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Offline Fr. George

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Re: Commemoration of saints at dismissal
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2008, 09:58:09 AM »
At the dismissal ("May Christ our True God who arose from the dead...")of Great Vespers and the Liturgy for a typical Sunday, I've noticed our priest usually commemorates only one saint, especially if that saint had three or four prosomia in his/her memory at "Lord, I have Cried."  Is this the typical practice?  I ask because when we have another priest to serve Vespers or the Liturgy when our priest is out, he mentions almost every saint commemorated in the Menaion for that day along with who they were, when they lived.  Sometimes, it just seems too much.  Is there even a typical practice?  The substitute priest serves Liturgy according to the Slavic Typicon as we follow the Greek Typicon.  Is there a difference in the dismissal according to those two traditions? 

I'm going to echo Arimethea - the "typical" is to only mention the names of saints "celebrated" that day - meaning there were hymns chanted in their honor.  However, since most people are not present for the reading of the full list of saints in the Synaxarion during Matins, I know a good number of priests who will read a more or less full list whenever they do dismissals.
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