Author Topic: Slavonic Music Critque  (Read 1987 times)

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Offline wynd

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« on: April 30, 2008, 08:59:58 PM »
Open the link I posted above, go to "Alexander Govorov's Choir," and click on  "Lord, by Thy strength... By Bortnyanskiy." I absolutely love it. To me, that's an epitome of Eastern Slavic church music, a brilliant piece of the 18-th century Ukrainian Rococo, the culture that gave the world St. Paisius Velichkovsky, St. John of Tobol'sk (the great-great-...great-uncle of St. John Maksymovych), and many others... And it's a Paschal hymn, too.

I must say I don't agree ;) I like the setting of Holy God by Uspensky much better  :P

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« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2008, 12:47:18 AM »
Christos Voskrese!

Some typical English language Prostopinije can be found in this youtube video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yR-r53D-KQE

Despite being the king of all chants, there unfortunately aren't a ton of recordings online of it.  One good resource is the Rusyn Heritage Radio Program, the archives of which are online in mp3 format.

http://www.carpathorusynsociety.org/RadioPgm/rhrp.html

The last Easter show has a good deal of chant in Slavonic.



Yes, prostopinije should be introduced to more people.  It is time proven congregational singing.  And it is the king of all chants

Offline AMM

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« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2008, 10:37:26 AM »
Open the link I posted above, go to "Alexander Govorov's Choir," and click on  "Lord, by Thy strength... By Bortnyanskiy." I absolutely love it. To me, that's an epitome of Eastern Slavic church music, a brilliant piece of the 18-th century Ukrainian Rococo, the culture that gave the world St. Paisius Velichkovsky, St. John of Tobol'sk (the great-great-...great-uncle of St. John Maksymovych), and many others... And it's a Paschal hymn, too.

Not to disagree but I must!

My preference has always been for the older, simpler chant forms - prostopinije or znamennyj.  The Baroque era and the 19th century Russians like Kedrov, etc. with complex harmonies and/or polyphonic singing just don't do it for me.  Give me a congregation singing plainchant or just a single cantor chanting monophonically any day.

Offline wynd

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« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2008, 12:16:47 PM »
Not to disagree but I must!

My preference has always been for the older, simpler chant forms - prostopinije or znamennyj.  The Baroque era and the 19th century Russians like Kedrov, etc. with complex harmonies and/or polyphonic singing just don't do it for me.  Give me a congregation singing plainchant or just a single cantor chanting monophonically any day.

Amen to that! Check out the link in Reply #9 above.

Offline AMM

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« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2008, 01:28:57 PM »
Amen to that! Check out the link in Reply #9 above.

Yes, the Valaam monks have kept traditional chant alive.

One of the issues I have is I think the complex choral stuff tends to shut the laity out to some extent and makes the work of the choir something of a performance.

Offline Heorhij

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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2008, 02:06:56 PM »
Not to disagree but I must!

My preference has always been for the older, simpler chant forms - prostopinije or znamennyj.  The Baroque era and the 19th century Russians like Kedrov, etc. with complex harmonies and/or polyphonic singing just don't do it for me.  Give me a congregation singing plainchant or just a single cantor chanting monophonically any day.

Well, I respect your taste but I am exactly the opposite. I love Baroque and Rococo, and I am simply bored by monodia.
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Offline Entscheidungsproblem

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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2008, 02:19:42 PM »
Well, I respect your taste but I am exactly the opposite. I love Baroque and Rococo, and I am simply bored by monodia.

I have to agree.  That piece you recommended, Lord, by Thy strength, was absolutely stunning!
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Offline wynd

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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2008, 03:28:40 PM »
My preference has always been for the older, simpler chant forms - prostopinije or znamennyj.  The Baroque era and the 19th century Russians like Kedrov, etc. with complex harmonies and/or polyphonic singing just don't do it for me.  Give me a congregation singing plainchant or just a single cantor chanting monophonically any day.

It's not the harmonies or polyphony that I don't like. What bothers me is that a lot of pieces I've heard almost sound like something you'd hear in an opera. The plainchant seems to avoid that for the most part.

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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2008, 04:23:30 PM »
Yes, the Valaam monks have kept traditional chant alive.

One of the issues I have is I think the complex choral stuff tends to shut the laity out to some extent and makes the work of the choir something of a performance.

Congregational singing allows for full participation of all those present, a work of the people, liturgy :)  And prostopinije/sub carpathian and the type you find in the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church/Orthodox churches has been time proven for centuries to allow people to pray as one during communal prayer services.. wheter a Divine Liturgy or a Moleben.

Offline AMM

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« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2008, 04:24:22 PM »
Kid tested, mother approved.