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Author Topic: Did Judas Repent? (Matt 27:3)  (Read 11402 times) Average Rating: 0
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Irish Hermit
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Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #90 on: April 28, 2009, 09:19:47 AM »

I'd like to tell you a special story from an old Russian Patericon but it might cause a meltdown.  Smiley

Come on, Father.  Don't tease us.

 Wink

OK!   Just a thought.....It is the common opinion of theologians that the fallen angels have had their eternal fate decided, and have irrevocably chosen against God.    Now while the theologians certainly have their common opinion but the Saints, always much better theologians, may be at odds with them.

For example, Saint Isaac the Syrian (7th century)wrote:

"What is a merciful heart? It is a heart that burns with love for the whole creation — for men, for birds, for beasts, for demons and for every creature."

Saint Isaac is not only wonderful and holy. He is also disturbing. I have no answers to this puzzle, but I do cherish the suspicion that our Lord expects us to mull it over a bit. Perhaps He has left us this Saint as a kind of gentle question mark placed over some of our certainties. Not over the essential ones, for Isaac himself is proof of those, but perhaps over others that we - not God - have declared certain.

See the web article
http://www.orthodoxeurope.org/theospirit/000013.php
"The Spiritual World of Isaac the Syrian"

by Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev, The Spiritual World of Isaac the Syrian. Cistercian Studies Series, Number 175. Kalamazoo MI and Spencer MA: Cistercian Publications, 2000.


And here is the story from an ancient Patericon:

I love this story about the redemption of a demon.

Don't swoop on me..!! I know the theological pitfalls in
this story -- and it is probably mythological
but I *still* like this story!
It resonates in my old Irish heart.


...With the Sign of the Cross, the old monk Abba
Joseph trapped in his cell a dark and miserable demon
who had come to tempt him. "Release me, Father, and let
me go," pleaded the demon, "I will not come to tempt you
again". "I will gladly do that, but on one condition,"
replied the monk. "You must sing for me the song that
you sang before God's Throne on high, before your fall."

The demon responded, "You know I cannot do that; it will
cause me cruel torture and suffering. And besides, Father,
no human ear can hear its ineffable sweetness and live,
for you will surely die." "Then you will have to remain
here in my cell," said the monk, "and bear with me the
full struggle of repentance." "Let me go, do not force me
to suffer," pleaded the demon." "Ah, but then you must
sing to me the song you sang on high before your fall with Satan."

So the dark and miserable demon, seeing that there was
no way out, began to sing, haltingly, barely audible
at first, groping for words long forgotten. As he sang,
the darkness which penetrated and surrounded him began
slowly to dissipate. The song grew ever louder and
increasingly stronger, and soon the demon was caught
up in its sweetness, his voice fully lifted up in worship
and praise. Boldly he sang of the power and the honour
and the glory of the Triune God on High, Creator of the
Universe, Master of Heaven and Earth, of all things visible
and invisible. As the song sung on high before all ages
resounded in the fullness of its might, a wondrous and
glorious light penetrated the venerable Abba's humble cell,
and the walls which had enclosed it were no more. Ineffable
love and joy surged into the very depths of the being
of the radiant and glorious angel, as he ever so gently
stooped down and covered with his wings the lifeless body
of the old hermit who had liberated him from the abyss of hell.

                        -oOo-

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tweety234
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« Reply #91 on: November 26, 2012, 08:35:22 PM »

Guess the only way to know is when I get to talk to him myself. Heh.

Good luck with that one buddy.
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“God has no religion.”
― Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi
tweety234
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« Reply #92 on: November 26, 2012, 08:49:52 PM »

The answer is a resounding no because Judas focused more on himself than on God.
*

Would you or anyone you know kill themselves on such a slight thing - a mere matter of "regret" or "remorse"?   "Hey, I've burnt the toast!"  Or " I killed the canary with too much flyspray!   I regret it and now plan to hang myself in the garage."

Judas' spiritual state obviously went much deeper than the superficial remorse that some here are ascribing to him.

When Christ descended into Hell and encountered Judas there, there is no proof that He refused to accept Judas' repentence.  There is no proof that He excluded Judas from His gracious act of redemption.

I look at the Christ who forgave Peter his triple denial and even assuaged Peter's grief in advance when He spoke to the women at the grave...."Go, and tell the disciples and Peter."  Notice the "and Peter."  This was the Saviour's wonderfully way of assuring Peter of His forgiveness and lifting the horror of his betrayal from his soul.  And then later He made the forgiveness quite concrete and returned Peter to the work of an Apostle with the triple "Lovest thou me..."

I believe that Christ the Saviour showed unto Judas the same forgiveness and compassion that He showed unto Peter... and to all of us.

We are not speaking of justifying Judas' perfidy, God forbid, but of the compassion of Christ for any soul which *repents* of its perfidy.  We are speaking of the power of Christ's redemptive work and the harrowing of Hell when He descended there after His crucifixion.

Jesus did not descent into hell. He descended into Hades. which is the place of the dead. Jesus did not go to hell, neither through it. He went to hades and preached to the dead.
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“God has no religion.”
― Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi
Tags: Judas Iscariot repentance suicide Hell Judas 
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