OrthodoxChristianity.net
October 22, 2014, 02:34:27 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy  (Read 17142 times) Average Rating: 5
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Cognomen
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: Phyletism Rules, OK
Posts: 1,968


Ungrateful Biped


« Reply #45 on: November 18, 2012, 02:19:20 AM »

Does anyone know of another Orthodox book approaching an introduction to Christianity via the Creed?

Another great idea.  Hopefully someone will know of a good one.

I'm disappointed that there aren't better Intro to Xtianity books, from an Orthodox perspective.  Wouldn't this benefit evangelization efforts to non-Christians to have these?

Mere Christianity seems to be a good suggestion for those looking for a basic intro that's easily digestible. Are there other suggestions, perhaps from other portions of Christianity (since we apparently don't have any/many).

Additionally, any podcasts that would accomplish similar goals of introduction to the Christian faith in a basic but meaningful and accurate fashion?  
« Last Edit: November 18, 2012, 02:20:26 AM by Cognomen » Logged

North American Eastern Orthodox Parish Council Delegate for the Canonization of Saints Twin Towers and Pentagon, as well as the Propagation of the Doctrine of the Assumption of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 (NAEOPCDCSTTPPDAMAFM®).
dzheremi
No longer posting here.
Warned
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 4,383


« Reply #46 on: November 18, 2012, 02:53:37 AM »

While it is Coptic Orthodox, not Byzantine, Ibn Kabar's 14th century treatise "The Lamp that Lights the Darkness In Clarifying the Service" has an entire chapter that goes through the Creed line by line. I only have this text in a partial translation, with the first four chapters only (of 24 total), but it is still quite fascinating.
Logged

Cognomen
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: Phyletism Rules, OK
Posts: 1,968


Ungrateful Biped


« Reply #47 on: November 18, 2012, 03:10:16 AM »

While it is Coptic Orthodox, not Byzantine, Ibn Kabar's 14th century treatise "The Lamp that Lights the Darkness In Clarifying the Service" has an entire chapter that goes through the Creed line by line. I only have this text in a partial translation, with the first four chapters only (of 24 total), but it is still quite fascinating.

Do you think this would serve well for a person with little background knowledge on Christianity?  Sounds great to me, but do you think it would be accessible and easy to comprehend (remember, you are a linguist with an affinity for theology and arcane and archaic documents)?  If so, what's the best way to get ahold of it?
Logged

North American Eastern Orthodox Parish Council Delegate for the Canonization of Saints Twin Towers and Pentagon, as well as the Propagation of the Doctrine of the Assumption of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 (NAEOPCDCSTTPPDAMAFM®).
dzheremi
No longer posting here.
Warned
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic
Posts: 4,383


« Reply #48 on: November 18, 2012, 03:53:28 AM »

While it is Coptic Orthodox, not Byzantine, Ibn Kabar's 14th century treatise "The Lamp that Lights the Darkness In Clarifying the Service" has an entire chapter that goes through the Creed line by line. I only have this text in a partial translation, with the first four chapters only (of 24 total), but it is still quite fascinating.

Do you think this would serve well for a person with little background knowledge on Christianity?  Sounds great to me, but do you think it would be accessible and easy to comprehend (remember, you are a linguist with an affinity for theology and arcane and archaic documents)?  If so, what's the best way to get ahold of it?

It might not be the first thing I would reach for, but if other options are exhausted, I don't see why it couldn't augment other books. I forgot to mention it, but it also includes a summary of Bishop Severus Ibn al-Muqaffaa's (a.k.a. Severus of Al-Ashmunein; d. 987) similar line-by-line exposition of the Creed, which goes into a bit more depth. I mainly mentioned this book because the poster had asked for such a line-by-line analysis, and in this work there are two. The text is not terribly difficult in itself (in terms of theological vocabulary used, which is not complicated), though the pdf I have is marked as a preliminary translation, and as such is somewhat rough. Much better than if I were to try to read it in Arabic, though! Unfortunately I don't remember exactly where I got it, but searching for Ibn Kabar and/or the title should bring it up. I'm sure it's available on Coptic sites.

A sample (from ch. 2 "The Orthodox Creed", pg. 47):

Quote
Our Saying: Begotten not made, Consubstantial with the Father:

Here the fathers (of the Church) showed the error of Arios in his saying: “The word of
God is created, newly made, and had a lord?” And he also claimed that the it is not
comprehensible that the word was born of the father unless he had to suffer the pain and
symptoms associated with (human) birth. John Chrysostom said in his book the explanation of
the creation: We do not deny- even if we knew with clear evidence and prior knowledge- that the
Word of God is born of the essence of the Father. He is not created. for this we do not question
how He was born of the Father, as we do not question how the creator created the creation.” But
the fathers did emphasize (that He is of the same essence as the Father) by their saying:
“Consubstantial with the Father” (of the same essence) since Arios states (differently) that the
creator is of three different essences, an old essence that is the Father, and two newer ones, that
is the Son and the Holy Spirit. The learned ones told us that: the Son is equal (one) with the
Father in His essence.” He is equivalent to Him in Essence,” and that: “Through Him all creation
was made,” as the Prophet David, said: “For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Thy
faithfulness is unto all generations: thou hast established the earth, and it abideth.” (Psalms
119:89-90). The holy gospel said: “All things were made by him; and without him was not any
thing made that was made.” (John 1:3). And the Apostle said: “For by him were all things
created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or
dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is
before all things, and by him all things consist. And he is the head of the body, the church: who
is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.
For it pleased the Father that in him should all fullness dwell;” (Colossians 1:16-19). And this is
the response to Onamios and his followers who agrees with Arios and his corrupt sayings.
Logged

Cognomen
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: Phyletism Rules, OK
Posts: 1,968


Ungrateful Biped


« Reply #49 on: November 18, 2012, 04:32:59 AM »

Thanks for the response and information, dzheremi.
Logged

North American Eastern Orthodox Parish Council Delegate for the Canonization of Saints Twin Towers and Pentagon, as well as the Propagation of the Doctrine of the Assumption of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 (NAEOPCDCSTTPPDAMAFM®).
izrima
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Raised Catholic, Inquiring Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Rome/OCA
Posts: 82



« Reply #50 on: November 18, 2012, 04:33:48 AM »

Does anyone know of another Orthodox book approaching an introduction to Christianity via the Creed?

Another great idea.  Hopefully someone will know of a good one.

I'm disappointed that there aren't better Intro to Xtianity books, from an Orthodox perspective.  Wouldn't this benefit evangelization efforts to non-Christians to have these?

Mere Christianity seems to be a good suggestion for those looking for a basic intro that's easily digestible. Are there other suggestions, perhaps from other portions of Christianity (since we apparently don't have any/many).

Additionally, any podcasts that would accomplish similar goals of introduction to the Christian faith in a basic but meaningful and accurate fashion?  

For sure evangelization would benefit from better books and resources. I hope we can do more. Ancient Faith Radio, for example, is a very effective tool. Speaking of which, podcast-wise, you might check out Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick's Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy lecture series on AFR. There is a fair amount of terminology, but in one of the first podcasts in the series, he tries to define some of the key terms and ideas. Then, if you are dealing with people from religious backgrounds of a non-Christian type, he does treat the world's major faith traditions. If the person is entirely faithless or atheist, that would probably be the greatest shortcoming. It is a great series, though. He is a talented lecturer.

I must say, I am right now halfway through this book called "The Faith: Understanding Orthodox Christianity, An Orthodox Catechism" by Clark Carlton. It is great! I think it could be a good resource even for the total newcomer. I was worried it would be super complex since it is a catechism, but it is actually very readable. Each chapter treats a major topic concisely, then has a paragraph or two of patristic writings on that topic, then drills down with some sort of topical application, and is followed by review questions. Carlton walks through fundamental teachings like the Incarnation in ways that are interesting to me as someone familiar with them but I think would also be approachable for the uninitiated.

Lastly, if you want to go beyond Orthodoxy, the single best conversion memoir I've ever read is "The Seven Storey Mountain" by Thomas Merton. It was that book that shook me awake from the most faithless, debauched year of my life--indeed, maybe it even saved my life. It is not really an introduction to Christianity doctrinally, but I would call it an introduction to Christian life and conversion.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 03:06:11 PM by Anastasios » Logged
asdamick
Doctrine matters.
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Patriarchate of Antioch
Posts: 73


Khouri Al-Imwas


WWW
« Reply #51 on: November 19, 2012, 04:17:50 PM »

For sure evangelization would benefit from better books and resources. I hope we can do more. Ancient Faith Radio, for example, is a very effective tool. Speaking of which, podcast-wise, you might check out Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick's Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy lecture series on AFR. There is a fair amount of terminology, but in one of the first podcasts in the series, he tries to define some of the key terms and ideas. Then, if you are dealing with people from religious backgrounds of a non-Christian type, he does treat the world's major faith traditions. If the person is entirely faithless or atheist, that would probably be the greatest shortcoming. It is a great series, though. He is a talented lecturer.

Thanks for your kind words.  Regarding your last comment about atheism, it's worth noting that I put an appendix on atheism and agnosticism in the book version of Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy, which is considerably revised and expanded in comparison to the podcast.  It can be purchased in both paperback and as an e-book at the following sites:

http://www.conciliarpress.com/products/Orthodoxy-and-Heterodoxy.html
http://amzn.to/1ue5SFx
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/orthodoxy-and-heterodoxy-fr-andrew-damick/1113639532?ean=2940013515208
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 03:06:48 PM by Anastasios » Logged

Author, "Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy" & "An Introduction to God" (both from Ancient Faith Publishing / Conciliar Press)
choy
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,316


« Reply #52 on: November 19, 2012, 04:29:41 PM »

For sure evangelization would benefit from better books and resources. I hope we can do more. Ancient Faith Radio, for example, is a very effective tool. Speaking of which, podcast-wise, you might check out Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick's Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy lecture series on AFR. There is a fair amount of terminology, but in one of the first podcasts in the series, he tries to define some of the key terms and ideas. Then, if you are dealing with people from religious backgrounds of a non-Christian type, he does treat the world's major faith traditions. If the person is entirely faithless or atheist, that would probably be the greatest shortcoming. It is a great series, though. He is a talented lecturer.

Thanks for your kind words.  Regarding your last comment about atheism, it's worth noting that I put an appendix on atheism and agnosticism in the book version of Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy, which is considerably revised and expanded in comparison to the podcast.  It can be purchased in both paperback and as an e-book at the following sites:

http://www.conciliarpress.com/products/Orthodoxy-and-Heterodoxy.html
http://www.amazon.com/Orthodoxy-Heterodoxy-Andrew-Stephen-Damick/dp/1936270137
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/orthodoxy-and-heterodoxy-fr-andrew-damick/1113639532?ean=2940013515208

I just want to say I love your work, Father.
Logged
izrima
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Raised Catholic, Inquiring Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Rome/OCA
Posts: 82



« Reply #53 on: November 19, 2012, 04:43:58 PM »

For sure evangelization would benefit from better books and resources. I hope we can do more. Ancient Faith Radio, for example, is a very effective tool. Speaking of which, podcast-wise, you might check out Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick's Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy lecture series on AFR. There is a fair amount of terminology, but in one of the first podcasts in the series, he tries to define some of the key terms and ideas. Then, if you are dealing with people from religious backgrounds of a non-Christian type, he does treat the world's major faith traditions. If the person is entirely faithless or atheist, that would probably be the greatest shortcoming. It is a great series, though. He is a talented lecturer.

Thanks for your kind words.  Regarding your last comment about atheism, it's worth noting that I put an appendix on atheism and agnosticism in the book version of Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy, which is considerably revised and expanded in comparison to the podcast.  It can be purchased in both paperback and as an e-book at the following sites:

http://www.conciliarpress.com/products/Orthodoxy-and-Heterodoxy.html
http://www.amazon.com/Orthodoxy-Heterodoxy-Andrew-Stephen-Damick/dp/1936270137
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/orthodoxy-and-heterodoxy-fr-andrew-damick/1113639532?ean=2940013515208

Wow, this reminds me of the first time a comedian tweeted back at me on Twitter! Father, I'd heard rumors you posted here. I am glad to see them confirmed. I got through your lecture series faster than any podcast archive I've yet to encounter--Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy is whatever the audio equivalent of a pageturner would be. I have a big stack of Orthodox books to get through at the moment, but I intend to include your book in the next batch I order. Thank you for your hard work!
Logged
asdamick
Doctrine matters.
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Patriarchate of Antioch
Posts: 73


Khouri Al-Imwas


WWW
« Reply #54 on: November 19, 2012, 05:04:51 PM »

Wow, this reminds me of the first time a comedian tweeted back at me on Twitter! Father, I'd heard rumors you posted here. I am glad to see them confirmed. I got through your lecture series faster than any podcast archive I've yet to encounter--Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy is whatever the audio equivalent of a pageturner would be. I have a big stack of Orthodox books to get through at the moment, but I intend to include your book in the next batch I order. Thank you for your hard work!

You're welcome!  Thanks for listening and reading!
Logged

Author, "Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy" & "An Introduction to God" (both from Ancient Faith Publishing / Conciliar Press)
Orthodox11
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,999


« Reply #55 on: November 19, 2012, 05:40:30 PM »

Fr. Vassilios Papavassiliou - Journey to the Kingdom
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 03:07:48 PM by Anastasios » Logged
Clare G.
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 90


« Reply #56 on: November 19, 2012, 06:39:35 PM »

Apologies for not returning here earlier. Many thanks to all for your suggestions.

I'm reluctant to recommend podcasts because I don't listen to any myself (I have a hearing problem). I prefer to offer a book that I have personally read and can, if appropriate, suggest sections to start on or to skip.

I especially like the sound of Fr Papavassiliou's book (and have ordered a copy; thank you Orthodox 11). Both these enquirers are already coming to our Sunday services; we are a small mission church with a monastic pattern of weekday and Sunday services, with Liturgy only once a month. I would not call them atheists or even agnostics: they simply have no knowledge of Christianity. This makes most of the books that explain Orthodoxy to the heterodox inappropriate. Yet it is wonderful (and a great responsibility) that in the new country to which they have come, they have been introduced to Orthodoxy first.
Logged
Putnik Namernik
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 482



« Reply #57 on: February 25, 2013, 09:43:24 PM »

"The Faith of the Saints: A Catechism of the Eastern Orthodox Church" St. Nikolaj Velimirovic. It is a very easy introductory book about Orthodox Christianity

Free sample of the book available online
http://www.scribd.com/doc/41594495/St-Nikolaj-Velimirovic-The-Origin-and-the-Source-of-the-Orthodox-Church-the-Faith-of-the-Holy



Enjoy!  Wink
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 03:08:37 PM by Anastasios » Logged
LenInSebastopol
Dimly Illumined
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptized, March 9, 2014
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 75


« Reply #58 on: April 06, 2013, 03:24:44 PM »

The Mountain of Silence by Kyriacos Markides is a book that helped me a lot. It's about the Athonite tradition of Christian spirituality and prayer of the heart.

The only thing to be aware of is that sometimes the author expresses views that don't quite agree with "orthodox" Orthodoxy, but it's fairly easy to tell when he is giving his own interpretation instead of the interpretation of the Church. He is an academically trained sociologist, which at least partially accounts for some of his non-traditional interpretations of things. But on the whole it is a good book.

Our priest read page 85 to us catechumens and it was AWESOME. Gave us true insight into suffering and the meaning of, why, etc.
Praise God.
Logged

Mark 14:36
God is with us, understand O' ye nations, and submit yourselves, for God is with us
Cyrillic
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 9,509


Cyrillico est imperare orbi universo


« Reply #59 on: May 08, 2013, 02:45:02 PM »

Does anyone know of another Orthodox book approaching an introduction to Christianity via the Creed?

The Orthodox Confession of the Catholic and Apostolic Eastern Church by St. Peter Mogila.
Logged

"And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin
is pride that apes humility."
-Samuel Coleridge
Mrs. Jord
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic marrying Orthodox
Posts: 10



« Reply #60 on: September 06, 2013, 12:05:29 AM »

Great suggestions in this thread.  Right now, I'm reading "The Orthodox Church" by Timothy Ware.  I decided to start with this book first, because I think I need to get a better foundation of the history of the church before I start getting into some theological details.  

I have to say it's seriously one of the best books I've ever read.  It's hard to put down.  He packs a ton of history in just about 327 pages, and it's accommodating to people coming from a Latin/Western perspective, which is a good thing.  I think everyone understands how off-putting it can be to read something about another denomination, or religion, only to find the author is abrasive, or inflammatory against your own church, or beliefs.

Anyway, after I finish this book, which should be soon, I'll be looking to find a book that covers some of the differences between Catholicism, and Orthodoxy.  
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 03:09:31 PM by Anastasios » Logged
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 6,855



« Reply #61 on: September 06, 2013, 12:29:01 AM »

Does anyone know of another Orthodox book approaching an introduction to Christianity via the Creed?

The Orthodox Confession of the Catholic and Apostolic Eastern Church by St. Peter Mogila.

The Longer Catechism of The Orthodox, Catholic, Eastern Church by St. Philaret of Moscow
Logged

Arachne
Trinary Unit || Resident Bossy Boots
Section Moderator
Protokentarchos
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Archdiocese of the British Isles and Ireland
Posts: 4,489


Tending Brigid's flame


« Reply #62 on: September 06, 2013, 03:01:11 AM »

Anyway, after I finish this book, which should be soon, I'll be looking to find a book that covers some of the differences between Catholicism, and Orthodoxy.

This is what you need. Shop around, though, because prices can vary widely.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 03:10:20 PM by Anastasios » Logged

'When you live your path all the time, you end up with both more path and more time.'~Venecia Rauls

Blog ~ Bookshelf ~ Jukebox
Robert scho
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox
Posts: 68


« Reply #63 on: October 26, 2013, 10:49:19 PM »

Hi to all and blessings;

-ORTHODOX STUDY BIBLE
-Becoming Orthodox-Fr Peter Guiliquist
-Anything by St.Theophan the recluse
-The Orthodox way-Kalistos Ware(or any by him)
-Elder Paisos
-Father George Calciu-Interviews & Homilies
-Homilies on Revelation-Athanasios Mitilinaos
-Anything by St John Chrysostom
-Orthodox Dogmatic Theology-"as a reference to Orthodoxy"
-Anything by Archbishop Lazar Puhalo-(particularly,"The Soul, The Body And Death)-Excellent work by him
-Eusebius-History of the church-
-In Search Of The Truth-Nicholas Mavromagoulos-(This book sheds light on the truth behind the Jehovas Witnesses doctrine and history)

To name a few, The Orthodox churches I've been to have had nice book stores with many titles Ideal for new members,just take your time,read the back cover first and understand exactly what it is first.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 04:28:32 PM by Anastasios » Logged

For a Christian ending to our life, painless, blameless, peaceful; and a good defense before the dread judgement seat of Christ, let us ask of the Lord.
And He said to me, “It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End.
xOrthodox4Christx
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Protestant (Inquirer)
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Christianity
Posts: 3,378



« Reply #64 on: October 26, 2013, 11:05:49 PM »

-The Didache

-St. Ignatius of Antioch

-St. Irenaeus

-St. Hilary of Poitiers

-St. Vincent of Lerins

-St. Athanasius of Alexandria

That's what I used. I don't have the privilege of spending money on books.
Logged

"Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living beings, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on earth.... While there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element, I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free." (Eugene Debs)
Mrs. Jord
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic marrying Orthodox
Posts: 10



« Reply #65 on: October 29, 2013, 06:50:09 PM »

Anyway, after I finish this book, which should be soon, I'll be looking to find a book that covers some of the differences between Catholicism, and Orthodoxy.

This is what you need. Shop around, though, because prices can vary widely.

Thanks for the suggestion.  It seems to have gotten a few bad reviews on Amazon, but I don't know how seriously to take those.

I'm looking into renting The Orthodox Church: An Introduction to its History, Doctrine, and Spiritual Culture by John Anthony McGuckin.  At $42.03 for a new paperback copy, it's just too expensive to buy.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 04:32:32 PM by Anastasios » Logged
xOrthodox4Christx
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Protestant (Inquirer)
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Christianity
Posts: 3,378



« Reply #66 on: October 29, 2013, 08:12:32 PM »

The Orthodox Faith, Fr. Thomas Hopko

http://oca.org/orthodoxy/the-orthodox-faith
Logged

"Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living beings, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on earth.... While there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element, I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free." (Eugene Debs)
Putnik Namernik
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 482



« Reply #67 on: November 13, 2013, 11:42:35 PM »

Anyway, after I finish this book, which should be soon, I'll be looking to find a book that covers some of the differences between Catholicism, and Orthodoxy.

This is what you need. Shop around, though, because prices can vary widely.

Thanks for the suggestion.  It seems to have gotten a few bad reviews on Amazon, but I don't know how seriously to take those.

I'm looking into renting The Orthodox Church: An Introduction to its History, Doctrine, and Spiritual Culture by John Anthony McGuckin.  At $42.03 for a new paperback copy, it's just too expensive to buy.

Don't forget about your public library. If your local library doesn't have Orthodox books then ask them for inter-library loan forms sp you can request such books from different libraries free of charge.
Logged
Mrs. Jord
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic marrying Orthodox
Posts: 10



« Reply #68 on: November 18, 2013, 11:02:56 PM »

Books I'm reading right now:

-"Changing Churches: An Orthodox, Catholic, and Lutheran Theological Conversation" by Mickey L. Mattox & A.G. Roeber
-"His Broken Body: Understanding and Healing the Schism between the Roman Catholic: An Orthodox Perspective" by Laurent A Cleenewerck
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 04:33:54 PM by Anastasios » Logged
Fire-Bird2014
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Russian/Serbian Church
Posts: 52


Have Faith!


« Reply #69 on: December 26, 2013, 12:32:06 AM »

TO ANYONE who has trouble accepting God with an open heart, I would recommend  The Search for Truth on the Path of Reason , the book by Aleksey Osipov, a well known Russian Orthodox theologian, professor and lecturer ("Truth" being "Christ"). He understands that many of us have issues accepting "blind faith" as a compass in life. This is why he reasons with those, poisoned by materialistic education. It is his only book translated into English. First few Chapters are intellectually challenging but the language is clear and logic is superb. This book appeals to those who love to read and think.

My favorite part is available for reading online
http://www.pravoslavie.ru/english/53476.htm

INTRODUCTION to the book

This book fills the order of a needed genre: Christian Apologetics for intellectual seekers and products of the Age of Reason. The author believes that, “It is natural for a Christian to know ‘the certainty of those things, wherein he has been instructed’ (cf. Lk. 1:4). But, as the Apostle Peter writes, you should be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear (1 Pet. 3:15).”

Prof. Osipov presents an overview of Western philosophy, the roots of religion and atheism, the relationship between religion and science, different forms of paganism, spiritual experience, and other related topics. He provides intelligent and clear arguments against atheism, and clearly delineates between all the various religious experiences, contrasting them with Orthodox experience and patristic teaching. This book has proved invaluable for seminary students and pastors in Russia as that country emerges from decades of religious persecution and a militant atheist regime. The Western philosophies and systems of thought described in this overview have left such a deep impressions on our society as well that we can scarcely see beyond their influence.

Osipov shows also the flip-side of Western rationalism, which is the various forms of mysticism and paganism that continually reproduce themselves in different guises. This book can help us to discern all of these trends, manifestations, and world views from an Orthodox, patristic perspective.

The book also includes a description of how Igumen Nikon (Vorobyev), who was Prof. Osipov’s spiritual guide and instructor from an early age, came to a sure and direct knowledge of God after desperate years of fruitless searching through science, philosophy, and psychology. He finally found the truth in his native Orthodox Christian religion; he then embarked upon the infinitely fulfilling study of the “science of sciences,” found in the unanimous experience of the fathers of our Church.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 04:34:43 PM by Anastasios » Logged

Be kinder than necessary, for everyone is fighting a battle.
Привнесите светлое, и тьма уидет!!!
Alxandra
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox
Posts: 27



« Reply #70 on: July 31, 2014, 02:44:48 PM »

My Elder Joseph the Hesychast is a wonderful book! Smiley  
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 04:35:22 PM by Anastasios » Logged

Ἅγιος ὁ Θεός, Ἅγιος ἰσχυρός, Ἅγιος ἀθάνατος, ἐλέησον ἡμας
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,487


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #71 on: October 01, 2014, 04:42:55 PM »

While it is Coptic Orthodox, not Byzantine, Ibn Kabar's 14th century treatise "The Lamp that Lights the Darkness In Clarifying the Service" has an entire chapter that goes through the Creed line by line. I only have this text in a partial translation, with the first four chapters only (of 24 total), but it is still quite fascinating.

Do you think this would serve well for a person with little background knowledge on Christianity?  Sounds great to me, but do you think it would be accessible and easy to comprehend (remember, you are a linguist with an affinity for theology and arcane and archaic documents)?  If so, what's the best way to get ahold of it?

Fr. Andrew's latest book, An Introduction to God is geared toward this.
Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.
WPM
Revolutionary Writer
Moderated
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,549



« Reply #72 on: October 01, 2014, 05:33:17 PM »

I'm familiar with most of the content published in Orthodox circles. Seems like most of it is geared towards educated thinkers
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 05:34:51 PM by WPM » Logged
Anastasios
Webdespota
Administrator
Merarches
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Old Calendarist
Posts: 10,487


Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Florina

anastasios0513
WWW
« Reply #73 on: October 01, 2014, 06:02:13 PM »

A lot of the stuff on my blog is geared towards the average Joe. I am working on transforming some of it into books. Here are a few examples from the 178 articles I have posted so far:


The Holy Apostles in History
If Orthodoxy Is True, Why Have I Never Heard of It?

Pastoral Notes section, featuring bulletin messages that were educational and reflective
« Last Edit: October 01, 2014, 06:03:07 PM by Anastasios » Logged

Please Buy My Book!

Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.
Don Brigante
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox
Posts: 69



« Reply #74 on: October 09, 2014, 11:22:46 PM »

Talking about “The Search for Truth on the Path of Reason” by Alexey Osipov... Professor Osipov uploaded this and his other books to his website:

http://www.alexey-osipov.ru/books-and-publications/

The uploaded books are mainly in Russian. However, some of them are in English, German, Spanish, Finnish, and even Chinese.

Here is an excerpt from professor Alexei Osipov's book "The Search for Truth on the Path of Reason":

There are several different points of view about the derivation of the word “religion” (from the Latin word religio, meaning conscientiousness, piety, reverence, religion, holiness, service to God). Thus, Cicero, the famous Roman orator, writer, and political activist of the first century B.C. considered that this word came from the Latin verb relegere (meaning, to gather again, to re-consider, to set aside for a particular use), with a connotative meaning of “showing reverence” or “relating to something with particular attention or respect.” Proceeding from this, Cicero sees the very existence of religion as reverence before the higher powers, before the Divinity. This thought of Cicero’s assuredly shows that piety is one of the most important elements of religion, without which religiosity becomes sanctimoniousness, hypocrisy, and empty ritual; and belief in God becomes no more than cold, lifeless doctrine. At the same time, we cannot agree with the statement that reverence toward something mysterious, even toward God, comprises the essence of religion. No matter how great and necessary piety is to religion, it is nevertheless only one of the feelings present in man’s religious relationship to God, and does not express its essence.

The famous Western Christian writer and orator Lactantious (†330) considered that the term “religion” comes from the Latin verb “religare,” which means “to bind, to join.” Therefore he defines religion as a union of piety between man and God. “With this condition,” he writes, “we are born in order to show a just and dutiful submission to the Lord Who has given us being; to know only Him, to follow only Him. Being bound by this union of piety, we find ourselves in union with God, from which religion has received its name. ‘Religion’ comes from the union of piety by which God has bound man with Himself….”

Lactantious’ definition reveals the very essence of religion—a living union of man’s spirit with God, which takes place within the secret chambers of the human heart.

Blessed Augustine (†430) similarly understood the essence of religion, although he considered that the word “religion” comes from the verb “religare” meaning “to come together,” and that religion itself indicates a coming together, the renewal of a once lost union between man and God. “Seeking this,” he writes, “or rather, seeking out again (from which apparently it has received the name ‘religion’), we yearn towards Him with love, so that once we attain it, we will be at peace.”

Thus, the etymology of the world “religion” points to its two basic meanings: unity and reverence, which explain religion as a mystical spiritual union: a living, reverent unification of man with God."

Sergei Bulgakov (†1944), the great Russian thinker and later theologian, expressed this thought in the following words:

"Religion is [a process of] acquiring the knowledge of God, and the experience of a connection with God."

The book in PDF

http://www.alexey-osipov.ru/web-files/books/Bog/God_(by_Osipov_A).pdf

The book in MS Word

http://www.alexey-osipov.ru/web-files/books/Put_razuma_v_poiskakh_istiny/Pyt_razuma_english_(A_I_Osipov).doc     

Prof. Alexei Osipov on contradictions in Gospels (it’s an excerpt from his other book, "God"):

Are there are contradictions in Gospels?

This objection comes from unawareness that Gospel has two sides. One is where external circumstances of the earthly life of Jesus Christ are described. This is where the authors of the New Testament report about what they saw themselves or heard about from others. It is possible to find here some inaccuracy in the presentation of facts and contradictions in the narration of one and the same event by different authors (e.g. one or two possessed with devils who met Jesus Christ – Mt. 8:28 and Mk.5:1; or how many times cock crew when Apostle Peter denied knowing Christ – Mt.26:75 and Mk 14:72). Such discrepancy is usual when different people describe one event. Moreover, the existence of this kind of discrepancies confirm the authenticity of the witness of the authors of the Gospels and show the respectful attitude of all who copied these texts. It would have not been difficult to correlate the texts or even remove these contradictions.

The other side of the of the Gospel provides for the basis of the Christian confession and is its primary source. It comprises the teaching about God, about Christ, about commandments and about other truths of faith and life. This teaching contains no contradictions. For Christianity, this is Divine Revelation. The Gospel’s teaching cannot be looked upon as yet another religious philosophic system that can be discussed from the point of view of our logic and frame of mind. Our logic and assumptions are not applicable to that sphere of life. Christianity has a number of objective arguments witnessing to its Divine origin...

http://goo.gl/GI4hCJ

http://www.alexey-osipov.ru/web-files/books/Bog/God_(by_Osipov_A).pdf

PS Osipov is a well known Russian Orthodox theologian, professor and lecturer from Moscow Orthodox Theological Seminary.
Logged

Brethren, let us also occupy yourselves with noetic prayer…, and seeking God’s mercy, cry out with a humble heart from morning till night and if possible all night long, saying constantly: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on us.” Saint John Chrysostom
Mockingbird
Mimus polyglottos
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Anglican (Episcopal Church)
Posts: 132



« Reply #75 on: October 09, 2014, 11:34:00 PM »

Since we've had several requests for books explaining Orthodoxy, let's start a thread here for that.  Please list the title, author, and a brief synopsis of the book.  Thank you!
Timothy Ware's books are excellent, as are John Meyendorff's and Alexander Schmemann's.  However, one who reads these excellent and inspired writers runs the risk of building in his head a naive and idealized picture of the Greco-Russian church.  I would recommend that such a one spend time on these boards.  He will become quickly disillusioned. Smiley

Another useful book is Eastern Orthodox Christianity: A Western Perspective by Daniel B. Clendenin:

http://www.amazon.com/Eastern-Orthodox-Christianity-Western-Perspective/dp/0801026520/&tag=orthodoxchr0a-20
« Last Edit: October 11, 2014, 08:35:35 PM by Anastasios » Logged

Forþon we sealon efestan þas Easterlican þing to asmeagenne and to gehealdanne, þaet we magon cuman to þam Easterlican daege, þe aa byð, mid fullum glaedscipe and wynsumnysse and ecere blisse.--Byrhtferth of Ramsey
Don Brigante
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox
Posts: 69



« Reply #76 on: October 17, 2014, 07:49:40 AM »

"These Truths We Hold". Compiled and edited by a monk of St. Tikhon's Monastery.

"The compilation of this book is an effort to gather from an on-going tradition of piety that which is traditional, for many, reinforceing the familiar - but equally beneficial, familiarizing many with an Orthodox continuity of things commonly observed. The style of themes, attitudes, expressions and images is popular in the sense that it has been the experience of Orthodox people in their own life and worship, representing how they were taught, what they have come to understand, and thus, have passed on to us.

It is uniquely Orthodox that theology is not solely the scholarly pursuit of a specialized class of clergy. We can, with much benefit, come in touch with what has been traditional for our people in Orthodox parishes for many generations as a theology of piety and practice. The necessary continuity for growth is to have some understanding of these truths commonly held by the Orthodox, and to be able to say, These Truths We Hold."

You can read it online:

http://www.sttikhonsmonastery.org/about_orthodoxy.html
Logged

Brethren, let us also occupy yourselves with noetic prayer…, and seeking God’s mercy, cry out with a humble heart from morning till night and if possible all night long, saying constantly: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on us.” Saint John Chrysostom
Don Brigante
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox
Posts: 69



« Reply #77 on: October 17, 2014, 11:09:32 AM »

These two are not books but lectures by prof. A.I. Osipov. It's two different lectures with the same title.

1 "Why Orthodoxy is the True Faith?"

http://www.pravoslavie.ru/english/7174.htm  (18 / 03 / 2004)

2 The lecture "Why Orthodoxy is the True Faith," delivered on September 13, 2000, at the Meeting of the Sretenskaya Lord's School in Moscow by A.I. Osipov, a professor of the Moscow Theological Academy.

http://www.stjohndc.org/Russian/homilies/HomiliesE/e_Osipov.htm

Prof. Osipov's Facebook
 
https://www.facebook.com/prof.alexeyosipov
 
Prof. Osipov's book "POSTHUMOUS LIFE. Deliberations of a contemporary theologian." Free download:
 
http://www.aosipov.ru/texts/POSTHUMOUS.doc
Logged

Brethren, let us also occupy yourselves with noetic prayer…, and seeking God’s mercy, cry out with a humble heart from morning till night and if possible all night long, saying constantly: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on us.” Saint John Chrysostom
Tags: Convert Books 
Pages: « 1 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.148 seconds with 59 queries.