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Author Topic: Christian History show on PBS last night  (Read 2526 times) Average Rating: 0
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Elisha
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« on: July 09, 2003, 01:51:54 PM »

Did anyone see it?  I was flipping back and forth between it and something else.  It was on PBS (my TV channel listing shows two PBS stations - weird) from 10-11 PT.  I think it was part of a regular show called Religions of the World.  It pretty much ignored Protestantism and focused on RCC and EO.  There was an RC priest, (I think) an EO priest (don't know who - had a balding forehead, trimmed beard and glasses - seemed Anglo, but could've been Greek or Russian (no accent)) and some "scholar type".  Even though it talked about the East vs. West, it was still rather western biased (of course).  Not bad for PBS, but I really didn't watch the whole thing.
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Elisha
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2003, 02:26:25 AM »

anyone?
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Hypo-Ortho
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2003, 02:11:04 PM »

anyone?

The only religion show that I saw on PBS last night, Elisha, was part of the program on the life of the overly-scrupulous Augustinian friar, Martin Luther.  From what I could see (despite all the corruption at the highest levels of Roman Catholicism at the time) was a bias in favor of Martin Luther the hero vs. the monolithic Roman Catholic Church, of which only the exposed sores but not the good being done were shown or emphasized.

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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2003, 03:40:28 PM »

Last night July 9th they had a speacial narrated by Martin Sheen on The Vatican. It was interesting, part of the show concentrated on the "ordination" of several new bishops. Only by watcing closely you could see that one of the bishops was Eastern Rite (he wore the Byzantine Bishop vestments before and after his "ordination").
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2003, 04:58:55 PM »

Quote
The only religion show that I saw on PBS last night, Elisha, was part of the program on the life of the overly-scrupulous Augustinian friar, Martin Luther.  From what I could see (despite all the corruption at the highest levels of Roman Catholicism at the time) was a bias in favor of Martin Luther the hero vs. the monolithic Roman Catholic Church, of which only the exposed sores but not the good being done were shown or emphasized.

Well if the show has a secular, or to put it simply, at all "modern" bias, it has to put a good spin on Luther - without him, the secular paradise they now enjoy (or to which they believe they're headed) would not have been possible.  The Reformation signalled the end of western Christendom, which it's safe to say most secular folks have little affection for.

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Keble
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2003, 08:00:37 AM »

Quote
The only religion show that I saw on PBS last night, Elisha, was part of the program on the life of the overly-scrupulous Augustinian friar, Martin Luther.  From what I could see (despite all the corruption at the highest levels of Roman Catholicism at the time) was a bias in favor of Martin Luther the hero vs. the monolithic Roman Catholic Church, of which only the exposed sores but not the good being done were shown or emphasized.

Well if the show has a secular, or to put it simply, at all "modern" bias, it has to put a good spin on Luther - without him, the secular paradise they now enjoy (or to which they believe they're headed) would not have been possible.  The Reformation signalled the end of western Christendom, which it's safe to say most secular folks have little affection for.

Most of you should be glad for Luther-- and especially for Henry VIII. How do you think your freedom to be Orthodox was purchased?
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Αριστοκλής
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2003, 09:47:45 AM »


Most of you should be glad for Luther-- and especially for Henry VIII. How do you think your freedom to be Orthodox was purchased?

Huh?HuhHuh?? Huh

Demetri
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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2003, 11:11:06 AM »

Keble:

I understand what you mean, at least insofar as it refers to the United States, but I think your statement a bit overbroad.

One could argue that the basis of even being Orthodox at all could be attributed to Russia, and the missionary efforts of Sts Herman and Innocent, regardless of the U. S.'s particular political arrangment.

Further, if you look at the early history of the U. S., it was far from certain that religious liberty would actually take the shape it now has.  Cf. the Baptist and Puritan "theocracies."
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« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2003, 11:52:55 AM »

Religous freedom was partly because of Puritans and partly because of Catholics in the USA.

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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2003, 12:18:18 PM »

I think it's stretching things a bit to say that we should attribute credit for our religious freedom to - of all people - Henry VIII and Martin Luther. Neither of them believed in allowing others religious freedom, that is plain.

HVIII and Luther are both part of the history of Western Europe, and it was there (in Britain, anyway) that modern representative democracy first developed. They made no direct contributions to its progress, however. It could be argued that both men were reactionaries who, if anything, slowed the advance of religious freedom.

Since democracy did ultimately flower in Britain, it is reasonable to posit that what HVIII did in taking England out of the papal orbit contributed to that. Certainly democracy was not HVIII's intent.

Luther's contribution, if any, is less clear, especially since the history of Germany is mostly a history of authoritarianism.
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Elisha
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« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2003, 12:23:41 PM »

Well, it appears no one saw that show I did then.  It was basically a Christian history up until the Reformation.  Russia, the Crusades and other issues were actually mentioned.  It seemed to have somewhat of an East vs West theme.
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« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2003, 12:59:13 PM »

Well, it appears no one saw that show I did then.  It was basically a Christian history up until the Reformation.  Russia, the Crusades and other issues were actually mentioned.  It seemed to have somewhat of an East vs West theme.
Elisha,
Perhaps your local PBS station aired a non-network show. We get many local programming shows here in central PA. I searched the pbs.org website and could not find the show you described; however, your description is tempting. Perhaps you could call/email your local PBS station's program manager for more information?
Demetri
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2003, 02:25:32 PM »

I also understand Keble's point, but think it's inaccurate. There were Protestant-esque revolts by Europeans even before Luther (The Pope was deposed at Basle in the 15th century, for example; this council also asserting that the Council was greater than a pope, and that once a Council began a Pope had no authority to move or close it by himself), and IMO once the "Enlightenment" hit it was all downhill for the papacy's power--in certain areas at least--anyway.
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« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2003, 03:51:30 PM »

Well, it appears no one saw that show I did then.  It was basically a Christian history up until the Reformation.  Russia, the Crusades and other issues were actually mentioned.  It seemed to have somewhat of an East vs West theme.

Lol.  Grin

True enough, but you know us: we'll use any thread as an excuse to blah, blah, blah-blah-blah . . .
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