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Author Topic: Taking A New Name  (Read 27247 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: April 08, 2008, 11:07:17 PM »

At baptism in the Orthodox Church, does everyone choose a new name? For instance, even if my name is James, would I take a new one?


This question doesn't have to do with taking a Saint's name, but I was wondering why St. Michael the Archangel is called St. Michael? I thought only humans became Saints.
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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2008, 11:25:04 PM »

At baptism in the Orthodox Church, does everyone choose a new name? For instance, even if my name is James, would I take a new one?
A good place to go for possible answers to this question:

Choosing A Chrismation Name

I particularly like Anastasios's Reply #20 on this thread.


Quote
This question doesn't have to do with taking a Saint's name, but I was wondering why St. Michael the Archangel is called St. Michael? I thought only humans became Saints.
A saint is not necessarily a human person whom we glorify for his exemplary and holy life.  The practice of calling the Archangel Michael a saint is evidence in and of itself that we apply the title "Saint" to anyone, human or not, who is particularly holy and sanctified.
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2008, 01:29:27 AM »

James is a saint in Holy Orthodoxy and Séamus is Gaelic for James, right?  Why don't you simply go by Séamus then?  Or Shamus as you've spelled it.  Wink  I think Séamus is a great name and, if my girlfriend agrees, we'll be using it as our son's middle name. (<--when we get married that is. Cheesy)  
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2008, 02:12:37 AM »

I think Séamus is a great name and, if my girlfriend agrees, we'll be using it as our son's middle name. (<--when we get married that is. Cheesy
I was beginning to wonder. Wink  Thanks for the clarification. Grin
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St. James


« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2008, 07:53:24 AM »

James is a saint in Holy Orthodoxy and Séamus is Gaelic for James, right?  Why don't you simply go by Séamus then?  Or Shamus as you've spelled it.  Wink  I think Séamus is a great name and, if my girlfriend agrees, we'll be using it as our son's middle name. (<--when we get married that is. Cheesy)  


Yes, and evidently I spelled it wrong. "Shamus" is slang for a private detective. lol, yeah, maybe I'll shoose Seamus. Of course, I do have a pretty long way to go before I worry about choosing a name.
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2008, 10:08:27 AM »

Some do, some don't. Gabriel, for instance, did choose a new name at chrismation. I'll let him tell the story if he wants. For me, I was given a saint's name at birth, with the full intention of my parents that I should be named after a saint--which is an Orthodox practice, despite their being Protestant. I felt it wouldn't be right for me to forsake my given name, which is really an Orthodox name already.

At any rate, whatever name you choose should be done in consultation with your priest, godparents, and biological parents--after all, they did name you in the first place.
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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2008, 10:10:15 PM »

My husband and I already had names that were saint names.  Our priest told us they were our patron saints and we wouldn't be choosing because of this.  The only time I've seen people having to choose a patron saint is when they have a name that isn't necessarily Christian already.  Anyway, St. Michael is my patron saint as well as that of our parish, and, we found out later that the day we were Chrismated was my husband's name day (it fell on Holy Saturday that year).  Thought it was cool.
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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2008, 08:58:39 PM »

Do you get to choose the name? And do you have to choose a name that hasn't been taken in your church?
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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2008, 09:40:41 PM »

Do you get to choose the name?
That's for you to work out with your sponsor and your priest when the time comes. Wink

Quote
And do you have to choose a name that hasn't been taken in your church?
I don't know about your parish, but from my experience the answer is a resounding NO.  I don't know how many people in my church have taken on the name of St. John the Baptist; I think I'd have to take my socks off to count them.
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2008, 11:05:25 PM »

My husband and I chose our childrens and our own. Then we met with our priest to discuss our choices.

And if you are given the option of choosing your own then I would meet with your sponsor and discuss it. They may have great and invaluable insight on the subject.
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« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2008, 11:30:35 PM »

When my children converted enmasse a few years back, neither my son-in-law nor daughter-in-law chose new names. The priest merely told them that they could celebrate their name day on All Saints Day.

I have seen people live to regret their name choice as they become decidedly irked at being referred to by names they can barely pronounce rather than the name they have had all their lives. On the other hand, I have known of others who have thoroughly hurt their parents and siblings by demanding that they be called Vladimir (or whatever) instead of the name they grew up with.   

An English friend of mine, refused to take a Greek name, even though his wife is Greek. He preferred to retain his own name and coincidently (or not, as the case may be) there was a St Alan of Cornwall. I considered Celtic or Anglo-Saxon names, but some of those are really hard to spell, let alone pronounce!! So I stuck with my middle name which is Irene, but everyone (except one person, who's a stickler for the rules) calls me by my first name, the one my parents chose for me. Apparently, it's not the one that the Lord will use to call me out of my grave, but I figure I'll know His voice when I hear it.  Grin


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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2008, 12:09:32 AM »

I would recommend to stay with your name, unless you really do not like it for an unrelated reason. Saints kept their names. As it has been pointed, some people have names of Saints, who assisted these people in coming to the Truth. Also, the transfer to the new faith, is responsible enough. Change in name may serve as an unnecessary, avoidable temptation. For example, Riddikulus provided some great illustrations here.
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2008, 10:31:50 AM »

I'm glad I stuck close to my birth name since my priest (bless his heart) has a hard time remembering names.  My patron is St. Juliana and my birth name is Julie, so he usually just calls me Julie or Julia.  A friend of mine took a name different from her first name and he still forgets her name occasionally.  Smiley  Not that it's a big deal, but it's easier on him if the names are closer, especially if you only go by your saint's name during communion.
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« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2008, 01:04:20 AM »

What do you do if your first name isn't the name of a Saint, but your middle name is? Can you choose a new one, and/or can you use your middle name?
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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2008, 01:57:43 AM »

What do you do if your first name isn't the name of a Saint, but your middle name is? Can you choose a new one, and/or can you use your middle name?

The priest will probably encourage you to go with your middle name as your saint....
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« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2008, 12:35:16 AM »

He had to do some digging, but my priest did find two saints (both male) whose name I share. I was rather shocked. He really encourages people to stick with their given name, or to choose a saint whose name is similar. I can tell you that personally I wasn't sure about this because I really wanted to choose a saint that I knew something about and could identify with (as opposed to just a name and a date). But, I decided that there is no such thing as a bad saint and anyway maybe my patron saint chose me.

When I "officially" chose which of the two saints I was going to take as my patron I felt a lot of peace. I feel like he was confirming to me that he is in fact my patron. So, I'm really glad I stuck with my given name.

Speaking of names, it appears that I typoed my username! Is there any way to fix this without registering for a new one? I'm new enough and have few enough posts that I probably will do that, if I can't fix it. Talk about embarrassing!

Bridget
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« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2008, 12:47:43 AM »

it appears that I typoed my username! Is there any way to fix this without registering for a new one? I'm new enough and have few enough posts that I probably will do that, if I can't fix it. Talk about embarrassing!
Fr. Chris is the person to correct this.  Just PM him with your concern.
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« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2008, 12:54:14 AM »

Fr. Chris is the person to correct this.  Just PM him with your concern.

Thanks!
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« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2008, 01:05:15 AM »

Fr. Chris is the person to correct this.  Just PM him with your concern.
Thanks for this info, Gabriel.  FrChris, the forum admin, is indeed the person you (Bridget) want to PM with your request that your username be changed.  BTW, Bridget, welcome to the forum. Grin


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« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2008, 12:16:35 PM »

I kept my baptismal name.  My mother always wanted to name her first born son my name, and when I was hatched low and behold she got to do just that.  However my first name is extremely biblical and a saint's name, so that works too! 
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« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2008, 10:32:36 PM »

According to Romanian tradition if you are named after a flower (Rose, Dallia, Petunia, Ficus) your name day is Pentecost.
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« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2009, 10:04:46 AM »

At baptism in the Orthodox Church, does everyone choose a new name? For instance, even if my name is James, would I take a new one?


This question doesn't have to do with taking a Saint's name, but I was wondering why St. Michael the Archangel is called St. Michael? I thought only humans became Saints.

All noetic creatures with a will may be Saints.
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« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2009, 11:28:23 PM »


The priest will probably encourage you to go with your middle name as your saint....
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« Reply #23 on: May 03, 2009, 01:21:32 AM »


The priest will probably encourage you to go with your middle name as your saint....
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Every situation is different. Your priest will direct you in the best path for you.
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« Reply #24 on: May 03, 2009, 05:52:18 PM »


The priest will probably encourage you to go with your middle name as your saint....
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Every situation is different. Your priest will direct you in the best path for you.
Oh OK, Thank You  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2009, 12:53:52 AM »

Sometimes people choose a Saint with the same name as them, and thus they do not receive a new name. Sometimes people receive a new name, but practically they choose to continue using their "secular" name. And sometimes people entirely change their name. That choice is up to you and your spiritual father.

I chose a new name (born Christopher I chose Cyril). I continue to use Christopher "in the world", so to speak, but use Cyril with Orthodox Christians.
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« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2009, 04:47:48 AM »

When my family and I were baptized, our Priest gave us all new names. We did not have any say in the matter, and I liked that because I know our names came from God and not from our own desires or wishes.

Of course I feel very unworthy of my name, which means "Servant of the Holy Spirit." But I am trying to cultivate the habit of using this name, even "in the world," because it is a reminder of my purpose on earth and who I was created to be.

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« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2009, 08:22:14 PM »

I didn't have much of a choice in my chrismation name.  Neither the priest nor I discussed it previously and I was rather nervous so he chrismated me "Bill", short for William.  The only St. William's I knew were all post 1054 until I found an obscure French monastic from the 8th century.  I hope nobody's going to tell me there is a St. Bill. 
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« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2009, 08:40:26 PM »

I didn't have much of a choice in my chrismation name.  Neither the priest nor I discussed it previously and I was rather nervous so he chrismated me "Bill", short for William.  The only St. William's I knew were all post 1054 until I found an obscure French monastic from the 8th century.  I hope nobody's going to tell me there is a St. Bill. 
I'm not sure of this, but I've heard that "William" is somehow derived from the name "Basil", which might make "Basil" an acceptable alternative if you wish to sanctify your birth name.
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« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2009, 09:00:31 PM »

I didn't have much of a choice in my chrismation name.  Neither the priest nor I discussed it previously and I was rather nervous so he chrismated me "Bill", short for William.  The only St. William's I knew were all post 1054 until I found an obscure French monastic from the 8th century.  I hope nobody's going to tell me there is a St. Bill. 
I'm not sure of this, but I've heard that "William" is somehow derived from the name "Basil", which might make "Basil" an acceptable alternative if you wish to sanctify your birth name.

The Greek translation for Basil, βασιλειος, can be Americanized to Bill; however, the etymology for William is strictly Germanic:

Quote
From Anglo-Norman < Old High German Willahelm from willo (“‘will’”) + helm (“‘helmet’”).

source
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« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2009, 09:05:00 PM »

I didn't have much of a choice in my chrismation name.  Neither the priest nor I discussed it previously and I was rather nervous so he chrismated me "Bill", short for William.  The only St. William's I knew were all post 1054 until I found an obscure French monastic from the 8th century.  I hope nobody's going to tell me there is a St. Bill. 

Usually William goes under Basil. My uncle Bill was baptised and chrismated in the Orthodox Church under William, so I wouldn't worry too much.

I have heard (do not know if this is true or not) if you don't have an official "Saints" name, you can celebrate Pentacost as your name's day. (Again, not sure on this point.)
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« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2009, 09:08:00 PM »

My Priest just had me use my name Edmund after St Edmund of East Anglia who was killed by vikings in the 800's. Its tough finding Icons of him though.
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« Reply #32 on: December 15, 2009, 01:06:08 AM »

My Priest just had me use my name Edmund after St Edmund of East Anglia who was killed by vikings in the 800's. Its tough finding Icons of him though.
Have you seen this one?




Quite an interesting story; It says that after being killed he was decapitated and his head was found by a friendly wolf.
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« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2009, 02:05:26 AM »

According to Romanian tradition if you are named after a flower (Rose, Dallia, Petunia, Ficus) your name day is Pentecost.
Well, first I haven't been aware that names as Ficus and Petunia exist.
Second, those bearing a flower/plant or other botanical name have their onomastic day on Palm Sunday (Rom. Florii-"The Flowery Sunday"), not on Pentecost.
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« Reply #34 on: December 15, 2009, 02:11:16 AM »

I kept my name since my parents named me explicitly for the Prophet-King David. But I have also wondered, does this practice of taking a saints' names mean there will be no more new names to choose from in the future? Is the deposit of names to choose from static now?
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« Reply #35 on: December 15, 2009, 02:13:16 AM »

My Priest just had me use my name Edmund after St Edmund of East Anglia who was killed by vikings in the 800's. Its tough finding Icons of him though.
Have you seen this one?




Quite an interesting story; It says that after being killed he was decapitated and his head was found by a friendly wolf.

Cool i've never seen the top one before very nice. I have seen the bottom one in fact I have it prined out from computer and its my icon of him. Its hard to find them to buy though. I've only found one place that has one. I plan on buying it soon. Thanks for the pics.
Yes it is an interesting story his head was taken away buy a friendly wolf and ended up in France. His body became a major pilgrimage site in England up until the reformation when the Anglicans destroyed his relics and his shrine. Ironicaly today since France remained Catholic they have relics of him but England the place where he came from doesnt.
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« Reply #36 on: December 15, 2009, 02:13:54 AM »

In the Greek use, anyone who does not bear the name of a Saint celebrates on All Saint's Day.
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« Reply #37 on: December 15, 2009, 02:16:07 AM »

I kept my name since my parents named me explicitly for the Prophet-King David. But I have also wondered, does this practice of taking a saints' names mean there will be no more new names to choose from in the future? Is the deposit of names to choose from static now?
The practice of giving a new name at an adult's baptism is not known in my church's tradition.
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« Reply #38 on: December 15, 2009, 02:26:49 AM »

I never really used my baptism or Reader's names.  I was already named after a saint.  But because I was the first grandson of my maternal grandfather, I was named Antonios.  Because three other "singers" and "readers"-to-be were Michaels, I was consecrated "Reader Michael."

So, ya, born Mina, baptized Antonios, consecrated Michael.  I have quite an arsenal of blessings  Grin
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« Reply #39 on: December 15, 2009, 02:46:01 AM »

According to Romanian tradition if you are named after a flower (Rose, Dallia, Petunia, Ficus) your name day is Pentecost.
Well, first I haven't been aware that names as Ficus and Petunia exist.
Second, those bearing a flower/plant or other botanical name have their onomastic day on Palm Sunday (Rom. Florii-"The Flowery Sunday"), not on Pentecost.

Greeks and, particularly, Cypriots, also have names with a botanical flavor: Triantafyllos/Triantafyllia (rose), Lemonia (lemon tree), etc. There is indeed a saint Triantafyllos, martyred during the Ottoman period.
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« Reply #40 on: December 15, 2009, 02:49:20 AM »

I kept my name since my parents named me explicitly for the Prophet-King David. But I have also wondered, does this practice of taking a saints' names mean there will be no more new names to choose from in the future? Is the deposit of names to choose from static now?

No. For those traditions which insist on bestowing the name of an actual saint, new names are being "added to the list", as it were. One such "new" name is Michaela: St Michaela of Moscow is one of the recently-glorified Russian New-martyrs and Confessors. At monastic tonsure, she was given the name Michaela, as her monastic patron was the Archangel Michael.
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« Reply #41 on: December 15, 2009, 03:59:41 AM »

I kept my name since my parents named me explicitly for the Prophet-King David. But I have also wondered, does this practice of taking a saints' names mean there will be no more new names to choose from in the future? Is the deposit of names to choose from static now?

To add to LBK's answer, when a convert becomes a saint, his birth name becomes available for use. St. Vladimir was baptized 'Basil' and St. Olga was baptized 'Helena', but as they have been glorified, Orthodox use their original names as baptismal names.
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« Reply #42 on: April 20, 2010, 05:12:15 PM »

What if a name forms a morpheded English name such as Christ-el = Christ God?

I have some opinions, but would like to learn more...

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« Reply #43 on: June 09, 2010, 08:22:41 AM »

When I was Chrismated, I didn't get a new name.

A big sign in Novgorod explains the story of Saint Mstislav:

When in the 11th Century King Harold II of England was killed by William the Conqueror, who the Roman Pope favored and who then conquered England for the Normans, Harold II's daughter Gytha moved to Rus and married Grand Prince Vladimir Monomakh. The Norse Sagas call Gytha's son Harald (I believe the Novgorod sign said Harold), who became Prince Mstislav of Novgorod and then Grand Prince of Rus in Kiev.

In Russia, they have a hard enough time pronouncing Harold, not to mention the idea that an Orthodox person would have such a name. So I say sometimes say Mstislav at communion. In America though, I say Harold because the name is clearer. The younger generations wanted to become America, and didn't feel it necessary to know Russian fluently or use it in common speech here.

When I was little I went to a Russian summer camp, where another student got the lesson-"name" Mstislav. I poked fun of him just a little for it, but he liked the name. Nothing to do about that.
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« Reply #44 on: June 09, 2010, 01:57:34 PM »

The Greek nove not only "botannical" names but also names drawn from classical literature. That may well be how St. Hermione got her name.  I know of one or two Greek Orthodox women named Electra, and I suspect if you look long enough, you'll find other names from Greek mythology popping up.
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« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2010, 11:31:48 PM »

If we took the rule of acquiring a Saint's name at every person's baptism to its logical conclusion, then wouldn't there be only about 12 different names in the set of Christian names.  For then the Christians who were baptized immediately after the twelve Apostles would have to take those Apostles' names.  But we know that most Christians in the first two or three centuries of the Church simply kept their pagan name, which in turn thereby became a Christian name upon their Glorification that future Christians would use. 

Then why can't I name my Child Thor or Ariadne, in the hope that he or she would become a Saint, whereon future Christians could take that name?
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« Reply #46 on: June 17, 2010, 02:34:40 AM »

Then why can't I name my Child Thor or Ariadne, in the hope that he or she would become a Saint, whereon future Christians could take that name?

There are at least two saints named Ariadne, with feast-days on August 22 and September 18.
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« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2010, 02:51:14 AM »

If we took the rule of acquiring a Saint's name at every person's baptism to its logical conclusion, then wouldn't there be only about 12 different names in the set of Christian names.  For then the Christians who were baptized immediately after the twelve Apostles would have to take those Apostles' names.  But we know that most Christians in the first two or three centuries of the Church simply kept their pagan name, which in turn thereby became a Christian name upon their Glorification that future Christians would use.
I think St. Vladimir, Baptizer of Rus, was himself baptized as Basil, yet we venerate him now as St. Vladimir.  ISTM that if we follow this precedent, you could take the name of a saint and keep your birth name and still have this birth name glorified should you live such a holy life that the Church deigns to glorify you as a saint.
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« Reply #48 on: June 17, 2010, 03:47:07 AM »


Then why can't I name my Child Thor or Ariadne, in the hope that he or she would become a Saint, whereon future Christians could take that name?

You would not be permitted to do that in the Russian Church.

You would be permitted to do that in the Serbian Church where there is no requirement to name a child with a Saint's name.

However, there really is a mountain of Saints' name available.  For example I post a daily e-mail of the Lives of the Celtic and Old English Saints.  That comprises a total of 1,200 names.    There are names such as Elvis and Samantha, and Summaryruff and Madhog, Caillen and Kelly, Finnian and Fillan, Goban and Judoc, Lasar and Lolan and hundreds more -----  all perfectly Orthodox names.
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« Reply #49 on: June 17, 2010, 02:46:33 PM »


 For example I post a daily e-mail of the Lives of the Celtic and Old English Saints. 

Pre-Schism Celtic and English Saints?
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« Reply #50 on: June 17, 2010, 09:34:16 PM »


 For example I post a daily e-mail of the Lives of the Celtic and Old English Saints.  

Pre-Schism Celtic and English Saints?

I am not really aware of any post-schism ones.   laugh
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« Reply #51 on: June 21, 2010, 12:40:14 AM »

When I was a catechumen I was very inspired by the writings and life of Archbishop AVERKY (Taushev) of Jordanville. Upon becoming Orthodox I was blessed to take the name Averky. Of course, there are also several early Christian saints by that name as well.
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« Reply #52 on: June 26, 2010, 01:26:52 PM »

Re William . Also from Guillaume in French  don't know how reliable this info is but there is St Guillaume en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_of_Gellone
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« Reply #53 on: July 03, 2010, 11:16:16 AM »

I gather I would probably be allowed to keep the name Christine at chrismation? I can't imagine being anything else.
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« Reply #54 on: July 03, 2010, 11:36:08 AM »

There's a Russian woman at my parish with a child named "Christina" so it must be okay. BTW, I love your avatar/icon! Do you have any information on this beautiful icon and where it can be purchased? Many, many thanks!
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« Reply #55 on: July 03, 2010, 11:49:46 AM »

I kept my name since my parents named me explicitly for the Prophet-King David. But I have also wondered, does this practice of taking a saints' names mean there will be no more new names to choose from in the future? Is the deposit of names to choose from static now?
The practice of giving a new name at an adult's baptism is not known in my church's tradition.

 I'm just curious, but is the reason for this because most, if not all, people in Romania already have Christian names? 
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« Reply #56 on: July 03, 2010, 12:40:52 PM »

I kept my name since my parents named me explicitly for the Prophet-King David. But I have also wondered, does this practice of taking a saints' names mean there will be no more new names to choose from in the future? Is the deposit of names to choose from static now?
The practice of giving a new name at an adult's baptism is not known in my church's tradition.

 I'm just curious, but is the reason for this because most, if not all, people in Romania already have Christian names? 
It could be, but it's not something highly rationalized; it just doesn't happen, you don't have to bear a "calendaristic" name.
I've have so many "Florica", "Florea" etc in my family. They were baptized as such, having no patron saints in the calendar so to speak. They kept Palm Sunday, though, as their patronal name's day.
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« Reply #57 on: July 03, 2010, 01:22:13 PM »

If we took the rule of acquiring a Saint's name at every person's baptism to its logical conclusion, then wouldn't there be only about 12 different names in the set of Christian names.  For then the Christians who were baptized immediately after the twelve Apostles would have to take those Apostles' names. 

No, they could take the names of Old Testament righteous as well... but I don't think the rule was so firmly set in those days. Hence we have saints with names like Dionysius.

Quote
Then why can't I name my Child Thor or Ariadne, in the hope that he or she would become a Saint, whereon future Christians could take that name?

If you were a pagan converting to Christianity, I suppose that would be alright. But now that you're a Christian, it makes sense to choose the names of saints.

BTW, Saint Vladimir of Kiev was baptized with the name "Basil" but today we know him as St. Vladimir. So new names can still be added to the Church.
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« Reply #58 on: July 03, 2010, 01:58:40 PM »

BTW, I love your avatar/icon! Do you have any information on this beautiful icon and where it can be purchased? Many, many thanks!

It is beautiful, isn't it? It's one of the avatars you can choose for your profile (#2728). I found this site, which credits Rev. Luke Dingman, but I'm not sure where you can buy it. I don't see it on Rev. Dingman's site anymore, but maybe you can contact him directly?
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« Reply #59 on: July 03, 2010, 02:56:50 PM »

BTW, I love your avatar/icon! Do you have any information on this beautiful icon and where it can be purchased? Many, many thanks!

It is beautiful, isn't it? It's one of the avatars you can choose for your profile (#2728). I found this site, which credits Rev. Luke Dingman, but I'm not sure where you can buy it. I don't see it on Rev. Dingman's site anymore, but maybe you can contact him directly?

Thanks, Chrissy! The icon is really beautiful. I love the orange background. For some reason, it speaks to me deeply-I am not always so struck by icons, but this one is something amazing.
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« Reply #60 on: July 03, 2010, 03:16:03 PM »

I gather I would probably be allowed to keep the name Christine at chrismation? I can't imagine being anything else.

I've found information on 3 Saints with that name, so I suppose it won't be a problem.
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« Reply #61 on: July 03, 2010, 04:34:08 PM »

My priest chrismated me with the name Peter, but only after some confusion...I had wanted to take the name "David," which was and is my legal first name.  When I was tonsured a reader, I (re)took the name David.

It fits: I read his psalms, I've carried his name for thirty years, and my birthday is Dec. 27th, which is either very close or, in the case of this last birthday of mine, right on his commemoration of the Sunday after Nativity.  Feels very organic and natural.
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« Reply #62 on: July 03, 2010, 04:39:31 PM »

Taking a new name during a reader tonsure?
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« Reply #63 on: July 03, 2010, 04:48:21 PM »

Taking a new name during a reader tonsure?

Yep.  He said that, theoretically, someone could take a new name each time he was tonsured/ordained something...though I think that would be pretty fickle if someone felt compelled to do that that often.
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« Reply #64 on: September 23, 2010, 07:45:45 PM »

When I first decided to convert I wanted to take the name Constantine, mainly because it was the only saint I knew of. However, my name is Christopher and my priest urged me to take the name of St. Christopher which is awesome because I feel I can relate to him more.
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« Reply #65 on: September 23, 2010, 09:01:47 PM »

I have been trying to think about a saint's name. I hope to be chrismated (God willing) at some time next year. I need to pray about it. Also, I have been reading 'A Cloud of Witnesses,' by Bishop Demetri Khoury, and 'Lives of Saints,' by Sebastian Dabovich, so I'm hoping these will help.   Smiley  angel
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« Reply #66 on: September 23, 2010, 10:56:42 PM »

I have been trying to think about a saint's name. I hope to be chrismated (God willing) at some time next year. I need to pray about it. Also, I have been reading 'A Cloud of Witnesses,' by Bishop Demetri Khoury, and 'Lives of Saints,' by Sebastian Dabovich, so I'm hoping these will help.   Smiley  angel

Sebastian Dabovich is most certainly a saint! Did you know that his official glorification is said to be "in the works"? He's one of our own, home-grown American saints, and a Serb to the bone. A special connection for those of us who were led into Orthodoxy through the Serbian Church.
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« Reply #67 on: November 17, 2010, 12:27:46 AM »

My birth name is James, which I pretty much use in everyday life.  When I was baptized, I took St. Cyprian as my patron, and go by that in the Church.  Not because I dislike my name, or that I prefer one saint to another, but there are deep, personal reasons that St. Cyprian is my patron.  Not sure if this really helps anyone, just felt this was the most appropriate place to share.
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« Reply #68 on: December 01, 2010, 02:25:35 AM »

I chose to take a new name at Christmation, for many reasons. I also chose to go to court and take it legally afterwards.

I oopted to take St. Vladimir as my patron saint, and his name as mine. Due to a little last minute confusion, and for the sake of my [protestant] parents' comfort, I was Christmated Vladimir James..., but legally ended up James Vladimir... I also kept my original middle name legally, and ended up with an obnoxiously long 4-names lol.

St. Vladimir was a natural fit... Many factors worked together at the same time, bringing me to Orthodoxy. The two most physical inspirations were the suggestion of a (curiously enough, menonite) professor, who suggested trying an Orthodox church as a way to get "in touch" with my Russian heritage. In addition, at the same time I was studying medieval Russian history, which is basically the history of the Russian Orthodox Church, [basically] starting with St. Vladimir. These two factors, along with some spiritual ones, brought me to the Orthodox church.

I chose to take it legally as a permament reminder of my faith, and a weapon in the battle of faith. I think it is easy for faith and spirituality to get sidelined or minimzed (pushed to the back of one's mind if you will), and physical reminders of the importance of those things make great weapons!
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« Reply #69 on: December 03, 2010, 06:50:33 PM »


 Once a person has chosen, or been given a new name, how customary is it to go by one's new name?  Only at Church services, all the time, rarely or does it matter?  I tend to gravitate to wanting to be addressed by my saints name and the one that the Church formally recognizes, though I don't insist on it (especially at work).  But, I might consider it if that be the Church's Tradition.  Thoughts? 
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« Reply #70 on: December 03, 2010, 06:53:27 PM »

Well, I know some people (even Priests) whose civil name if different from their Church name. They use their civil name mostly and their Church name - only during services (confession, approaching the Chalice, proskomedia etc.).
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« Reply #71 on: December 03, 2010, 07:02:57 PM »

I can see the arguments for both opinions (adopting one's new name everywhere vs. only in church).  Although it does seem to me that adopting one's new name, even changing it legally, would seemlessly fit into the idea of "putting on the New Man."  Afterall, becoming an Orthodox Christian really is a complete 180 degree turn (metanoia?) and adopting a completely new identity.  Still, I'm curious as to what, if anything, the Church says.
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« Reply #72 on: December 03, 2010, 08:00:20 PM »

I did not start going by Vladimir. There are several reasons for this, from just the simplicity of it, to other more important issues. Most people that know me well do know it was added legally. I am wondering if when I move to Russia in January I will start to use it. My only concern is giving off any false impressions by introducing myself as Vladimir (either that I speak fluent Russian, or that I am one of those weirdo Americans that just made up a name because, well I am weird [yea I knew people like that when I went to Russia before]). Smiley

EDIT: As I mentioned before I was changing my first name to Vladimir, making James my middle name... but switched at the last minute for my parents' sake. (Despite telling them several times it was going to happen, they were "surprised" when it was time). I did however tell them I will at some point do it again and follow the first plan. Whether that will ever happen or not, who knows. Changing your name is kind of a frustrating process  Cheesy.
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« Reply #73 on: December 03, 2010, 10:01:05 PM »

I use my secular name in secular contexts, but when I am speaking with Orthodox Christians I tend to push the idea of referring to me by my baptismal name a little.
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« Reply #74 on: December 07, 2010, 12:28:07 AM »

My Priest just had me use my name Edmund after St Edmund of East Anglia who was killed by vikings in the 800's. Its tough finding Icons of him though.
Have you seen this one?




Quite an interesting story; It says that after being killed he was decapitated and his head was found by a friendly wolf.

Cool i've never seen the top one before very nice. I have seen the bottom one in fact I have it prined out from computer and its my icon of him. Its hard to find them to buy though. I've only found one place that has one. I plan on buying it soon. Thanks for the pics.
Yes it is an interesting story his head was taken away buy a friendly wolf and ended up in France. His body became a major pilgrimage site in England up until the reformation when the Anglicans destroyed his relics and his shrine. Ironicaly today since France remained Catholic they have relics of him but England the place where he came from doesnt.

Also, have you checked out this site?:

http://www.allmercifulsavior.com/icons/Icons-Edmund.htm

And for everyone with Western names, you might try this awesome site. There are TONS of saints on this list - WITH ICONS!

http://www.allmercifulsavior.com/icons/Western.html
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« Reply #75 on: February 17, 2011, 12:16:38 PM »

My Priest just had me use my name Edmund after St Edmund of East Anglia who was killed by vikings in the 800's. Its tough finding Icons of him though.
Have you seen this one?

I think England would be the best place to find an icon of St Edmund. Check out Aidan Hart Icons www.aidanharticons.com for handmade originals and commissions, or Pilgirm Icons of Walsingham http://www.pilgrimgifts.co.uk/ for printed board and silkscreen icons. The silkscreen icons are illumined with imitation goldleaf, which glows like the real thing, from £20 (about $25 +p&p)

My avatar icon of St Aidan is by Aidan Hart
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« Reply #76 on: February 17, 2011, 12:52:21 PM »


Then why can't I name my Child Thor or Ariadne, in the hope that he or she would become a Saint, whereon future Christians could take that name?

You would not be permitted to do that in the Russian Church.

You would be permitted to do that in the Serbian Church where there is no requirement to name a child with a Saint's name.

However, there really is a mountain of Saints' name available.  For example I post a daily e-mail of the Lives of the Celtic and Old English Saints.  That comprises a total of 1,200 names.    There are names such as Elvis and Samantha, and Summaryruff and Madhog, Caillen and Kelly, Finnian and Fillan, Goban and Judoc, Lasar and Lolan and hundreds more -----  all perfectly Orthodox names.

St. Elvis? Now that's rich...  laugh
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« Reply #77 on: February 23, 2011, 02:39:08 AM »

I have a question which I haven't thought about till now, at 1230 am my time.  I was confirmed in the Catholic Church, I know my confirmed name is Catherine or Katherine- I do not honestly remember why I chose this name for confirmation. Would I retain that name when confirmed in the Orthodox church since several accept the sacraments of the Catholic Church, or chose a new name? Just a random thought....
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« Reply #78 on: February 23, 2011, 02:56:46 AM »

No reason why you can't keep Katherine.  Your Patron Saint would then be St. Katherine of Alexandrea, Great-Martyr (11/25).
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« Reply #79 on: February 23, 2011, 04:33:55 AM »

I have a question which I haven't thought about till now, at 1230 am my time.  I was confirmed in the Catholic Church, I know my confirmed name is Catherine or Katherine- I do not honestly remember why I chose this name for confirmation. Would I retain that name when confirmed in the Orthodox church since several accept the sacraments of the Catholic Church, or chose a new name? Just a random thought....

You are being misled if you are wishing to retain this name on the basis of the idea that we commonly accept the Roman communion as having legitimate Christian Sacraments.
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« Reply #80 on: February 23, 2011, 08:56:22 PM »

When a man named William at church was chrismated he asked the priest to choose a name for him. The priest, after study and prayer, decided on Alexander Nevsky, since William was an army officer. So not just a similar name can be chosen but something else to match the saint with the person.
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« Reply #81 on: February 23, 2011, 10:02:36 PM »

My mother was insistant that I be named after a Saint whose name was recorded in the NT, much to father's chagrin as it was not "Irish".

Funny thing is that when I mention my name is a Saint from the NT, people look at me like I am crazy and ask if I am sure, unless they are protestant.

Let's be honest, protestants for the most part pwn OCs and RCs on Biblical recall.

Never ceases to amaze me. They will even argue that it ain't Greek, till I bring up it's pagan context, then they have an aha!, but still are surprised it is in the NT.

Guess what it is. Unless you already know from PMs here and whatnot.
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« Reply #82 on: February 23, 2011, 11:19:12 PM »

My mother was insistant that I be named after a Saint whose name was recorded in the NT, much to father's chagrin as it was not "Irish".

Funny thing is that when I mention my name is a Saint from the NT, people look at me like I am crazy and ask if I am sure, unless they are protestant.

Let's be honest, protestants for the most part pwn OCs and RCs on Biblical recall.

Never ceases to amaze me. They will even argue that it ain't Greek, till I bring up it's pagan context, then they have an aha!, but still are surprised it is in the NT.

Guess what it is. Unless you already know from PMs here and whatnot.
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« Reply #83 on: February 23, 2011, 11:37:33 PM »

I have never gone by my church name for anything other than sacraments, but I used to know people who would call me by it even outside church.  I told them I preferred to be called by my legal name over my church name, but some of them became rather pushy and harassing about calling me by that name, and implied I was a bad Christian for *not* going by it.  Anybody else ever had to deal with someone who did that? 

Most people have been rather nice about it and didn't push the issue, and consequently I didn't mind whether they called me one name or the other.  It was when people didn't listen, and kept doing it out of spite, that it became offensive.
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« Reply #84 on: February 23, 2011, 11:38:40 PM »

Guess what it is. Unless you already know from PMs here and whatnot.

Dionysius?
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« Reply #85 on: February 24, 2011, 03:41:30 AM »

This is a case where you all are too smart for yourselves. Very common name in the English speaking world, or at least American speaking.

It will be an eye-roller, but proves my point about people (not you all) not knowing their Bible.
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« Reply #86 on: February 24, 2011, 03:46:45 AM »

This is a case where you all are too smart for yourselves. Very common name in the English speaking world, or at least American speaking.

It will be an eye-roller, but proves my point about people (not you all) not knowing their Bible.
Jason

24th most common male name in the US according to the 1990 census, and the name of a saint mentioned in Romans 16:21 (also a name mentioned quite frequently in the books of the Maccabees, though not at all in the rest of the OT)
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« Reply #87 on: February 24, 2011, 04:14:23 AM »

This is a case where you all are too smart for yourselves. Very common name in the English speaking world, or at least American speaking.

It will be an eye-roller, but proves my point about people (not you all) not knowing their Bible.
Jason

24th most common male name in the US according to the 1990 census, and the name of a saint mentioned in Romans 16:21 (also a name mentioned quite frequently in the books of the Maccabees, though not at all in the rest of the OT)

Bingo!

A famous baby name book from the 80's: Beyond Jennifer and Jason.

The up to date version is: Beyond Jennifer & Jason, Madison & Montana: What to Name Your Baby Now.

EDIT: See Acts 17
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« Reply #88 on: February 24, 2011, 01:57:25 PM »

This is a case where you all are too smart for yourselves. Very common name in the English speaking world, or at least American speaking.

It will be an eye-roller, but proves my point about people (not you all) not knowing their Bible.
Jason

24th most common male name in the US according to the 1990 census, and the name of a saint mentioned in Romans 16:21 (also a name mentioned quite frequently in the books of the Maccabees, though not at all in the rest of the OT)

Bingo!

A famous baby name book from the 80's: Beyond Jennifer and Jason.

The up to date version is: Beyond Jennifer & Jason, Madison & Montana: What to Name Your Baby Now.

EDIT: See Acts 17
I had a childhood friend named Jason. We spent a lot of our afternoons playing one-on-one football or just plain ol' wrastling in the grass. He was always stronger than I, so he always won.
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« Reply #89 on: June 16, 2011, 12:58:51 PM »

I didn't have much of a choice in my chrismation name.  Neither the priest nor I discussed it previously and I was rather nervous so he chrismated me "Bill", short for William.  The only St. William's I knew were all post 1054 until I found an obscure French monastic from the 8th century.  I hope nobody's going to tell me there is a St. Bill. 

If you're talking about St. Guilhem-le-Desert, it was hardly obscure! St. William of Gellone, the founder, was a very famous saint in his day, and his monastery (now called St. William of Orange in English) was a very important pilgrimage site. It was also along the route to Compostella, which made it a popular resting spot.

Until the 11th century or so, most saints were canonized by the local bishop. Then, as the pope began arrogating more power to himself, he started claiming the exclusive right to proclaim saints. The monks of St. Guilhem didn't want to lose their status (and presumably their income), so they asked to have him canonized a second time by the pope, in 1066. But his cult was widely celebrated from the ninth century on.
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« Reply #90 on: June 16, 2011, 01:12:56 PM »

When a man named William at church was chrismated he asked the priest to choose a name for him. The priest, after study and prayer, decided on Alexander Nevsky, since William was an army officer. So not just a similar name can be chosen but something else to match the saint with the person.

There's at least one Orthodox St. William, Bishop of Regensburg.
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« Reply #91 on: June 25, 2011, 10:08:23 PM »

When I was baptized in the Roman church, I chose Annette as my baptismal name, since its my birth name anyway, and Joan as my confirmation name (St Joan of Arc).

When I join the Orthodox Church, what do I do? Just keep "Annette" for St Anna?
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« Reply #92 on: June 26, 2011, 03:39:01 AM »

I was given my baptismal name by my godmother and my priest, who acted in concert.  (Like a symphony on a discordant note, but still...)

Anyway, I just wanted to say that "James" is my priest's name...I loveit.  "James" was the first bishop of jersusalem.  You can't get much more Orthodox than that.  Don't worry about it.  It will all come together in God's time.  In the meantime, have FUN.  Enjoy your catechumenate.  Don't waste it on legalism and the Philokalia.  Enjoy learning from the people in your parish who will become your extended family.  Enjoy dinners out with your priest and Matushka (or Popadija, or Presbytera or whatever).  Enjoy coffee hours at Starbucks with people in your parish you "click" with.. Have a good time, and remember that martyrdom is a split-second away always...so cherish the moment of every day you breathe.  Whether you "breathe" it as "James" or "Theophan" or "Silouan" or whatever....cherish your time and  your life in the Church.  God knows your name and He will call it out when the time comes....rest assured.

I am praying for you...
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« Reply #93 on: June 26, 2011, 12:28:51 PM »

Funny thing from a book I read a while ago: "Contrary to popular belief, there is no St. Cheryl."  Wink Cheesy
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« Reply #94 on: June 26, 2011, 10:24:00 PM »

Quite often when a person goes through a tonsuring ceremony, whether it is baptism or monastic tonsuring (as well as elevation to the episcopate), they are given a new name.

The change of name signifies that a new life has begun.

However, when people receive a new name at Baptism, I make sure to tell them that they ought to go on venerating the Saint whose name they used to have.  After all,  it is by his holy prayers and guidance and nudging that they reached their new life in Baptism or in monasticism.  
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« Reply #95 on: June 27, 2011, 12:26:37 AM »

To Peter:

What do you think of the idea of striving to sanctify your old name?

Not a problem since my old name was Joanna and my baptismal name is Joanna, but now it is sanctified in the Truth.  BTW.  Joanna is one of the myrrbearing women that went to the tomb of Christ; in case you didn't know.  But if your old name is non-Christian then it should become a Christian name.  But, I believe that there was always an effort to find the equivalent Christian name since we are being baptised in Christ.  Is Trevor a Christian name?  How do you sanctify that name?
By becoming a saint

When one comes into the Church from a heterodox Christian tradition, does the Christian life one lived before becoming Orthodox, the Christian life that may very well have brought one to Orthodoxy, suddenly count for nothing?

Only Jesus Christ brings one to Orthodoxy.  The Christian life we led was an illusion, but I believe that all who came to Orthodoxy were not influenced by their "Christian" life, but that they were seeking the truth.  Something in us kept questioning our circumstance.
That's certainly your opinion, the validity of which I'm not questioning, but it is merely your opinion. Personally, I don't share it. I will not believe that my earlier life as a Protestant was nothing more than a sham. It certainly was never as full of spirit and of truth as my life now in the Orthodox Church, but it was never a mere illusion, either. No opinion you share is going to change my mind on that.

Does the albeit heterodox Christian heritage of my birth family, the family that gave me my name after my very Christian grandfather, suddenly count for nothing?

The only name that matters is your baptismal name which is SANCTIFIED by GOD by Holy Baptism..  Your last name is a matter of pride.  It is not sanctified.
I'm not talking about my surname. I'm talking about the first name (e.g., Frank, Jason, Edward, Norman, etc.) I was given at birth.

Point in case, when a woman marries, she takes the man's name.  So did she lose her identity?  No!  Because her identity and the name that her guardian angel will call her is by her BAPTISMAL NAME, not her married or maiden name.

He will say:  Joanna come forth and face your Lord.  He will not say, Ms. Smith come and face your Lord.

Seriously,  how can you trace your ancestry through so many generations.  But, you can always trace your link to the saint you were named after.  Does God bless last names or the names we are baptised in?  Are there Name's Days for last names?
What about first names? The only time I had someone address me by my last name only was in the Marine Corps.
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« Reply #96 on: June 27, 2011, 06:41:26 AM »

"Not a problem since my old name was Joanna and my baptismal name is Joanna, but now it is sanctified in the Truth.  BTW.  Joanna is one of the myrrbearing women that went to the tomb of Christ; in case you didn't know."

By the way, Happy Name Day, today! Smiley
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« Reply #97 on: June 27, 2011, 11:11:22 AM »

Quite often when a person goes through a tonsuring ceremony, whether it is baptism or monastic tonsuring (as well as elevation to the episcopate), they are given a new name.

The change of name signifies that a new life has begun.

However, when people receive a new name at Baptism, I make sure to tell them that they ought to go on venerating the Saint whose name they used to have.  After all,  it is by his holy prayers and guidance and nudging that they reached their new life in Baptism or in monasticism. 
Are any of these names considered the same as the name on the white stone in Revelation?
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« Reply #98 on: June 27, 2011, 11:21:48 AM »

When I was baptised in the Catholic church, I was given the name Ronald by my parents.  In our parish school, the nun that taught us was asking us to give a talk about the saint whose name we bore.  I cried since I couldn't find a St. Ronald.  The kids made fun of me, but the nun was quick to say that it was then my vocation to make it a saint's name.  When I was christmated in the Orthodox church I was allowed to pick my own name and it was St. Vlodymyr.  Finally when I was tonsured a monk, I hated giving up the name Volodymyr, so I took Vasyl.  Vasyl was the baptismal name of St. Volodymyr.
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« Reply #99 on: June 27, 2011, 01:14:28 PM »

Just so you know, Joasia, not all women who marry take their husband's last name. I didn't, and our children in fact have both our names, joined by a hyphen (no, I'm not a feminist in any way, shape or form....I did it to honor my father's memory and that of my father in law, both of whose family names would have died out if we had not done it this way.)
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« Reply #100 on: June 27, 2011, 01:37:30 PM »

When I was baptised in the Catholic church, I was given the name Ronald by my parents.  In our parish school, the nun that taught us was asking us to give a talk about the saint whose name we bore.  I cried since I couldn't find a St. Ronald.  The kids made fun of me, but the nun was quick to say that it was then my vocation to make it a saint's name.  When I was christmated in the Orthodox church I was allowed to pick my own name and it was St. Vlodymyr.  Finally when I was tonsured a monk, I hated giving up the name Volodymyr, so I took Vasyl.  Vasyl was the baptismal name of St. Volodymyr.

Too bad Google wasn't around when you were a kid.
Quote
Saint Ronald - Feastday: August 20, 1158. A warrior chieftain in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. According to tradition, he made a vow to build a church, fulfilling the pledge by erecting the cathedral of St. Magnus at Kirkwall. Ronald was later murdered by a group of rebelling warriors and was venerated as a martyr at Kirkwall.
http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=4643
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« Reply #101 on: June 27, 2011, 02:00:46 PM »

When I was baptised in the Catholic church, I was given the name Ronald by my parents.  In our parish school, the nun that taught us was asking us to give a talk about the saint whose name we bore.  I cried since I couldn't find a St. Ronald.  The kids made fun of me, but the nun was quick to say that it was then my vocation to make it a saint's name.  When I was christmated in the Orthodox church I was allowed to pick my own name and it was St. Vlodymyr.  Finally when I was tonsured a monk, I hated giving up the name Volodymyr, so I took Vasyl.  Vasyl was the baptismal name of St. Volodymyr.

Too bad Google wasn't around when you were a kid.
Quote
Saint Ronald - Feastday: August 20, 1158. A warrior chieftain in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. According to tradition, he made a vow to build a church, fulfilling the pledge by erecting the cathedral of St. Magnus at Kirkwall. Ronald was later murdered by a group of rebelling warriors and was venerated as a martyr at Kirkwall.
http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=4643
Wouldn't help him in the Orthodox church, unfortunately.
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« Reply #102 on: July 01, 2011, 12:07:37 PM »

Well, Im in luck!

St. Henry (which is my name too) - Check!
Pre Schism - Check!
Holy Roman Emperor - Che...oh..wait....

primuspilus
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« Reply #103 on: July 11, 2012, 12:27:21 AM »

In the Greek use, anyone who does not bear the name of a Saint celebrates on All Saint's Day.
What do they do at Communion when the priest asks for the Saint's name?
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« Reply #104 on: July 11, 2012, 01:08:24 AM »

I have a friend named Electra (and it's not that unusual a name among Greeks).  She gives that name at Communion.
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« Reply #105 on: July 11, 2012, 01:53:08 AM »

I have a friend named Electra (and it's not that unusual a name among Greeks).  She gives that name at Communion.

There are a good number of Orthodox saints who bear pre-Christian Greek and Roman names, such as Tatiana, Aphrodite, Euterpe, Antigone, Socrates, Priscilla, Cleopatra, Themistokles, Hermes, and Augustus.
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« Reply #106 on: July 16, 2012, 09:29:20 AM »

Much like Cyprian1975, I have a very great affection for and devotion to St Cyprian of Carthage.

Unfortunately, there was a misunderstanding due to unspoken, different expectations between my parish priest and me.  The custom of my priest was to follow the widespread custom of not giving a new name to someone who already has a saint's name.  He innocently assumed that this is what I wanted, so never brought it up.  However, even though it is very common, I had never heard of this custom as I was still very new.  In exploring Orthodoxy, I had come across many converts talking about taking a new name and had thought that this was the norm.  I assumed that this would be discussed at the appropriate time, so I never brought it up either.  So neither one of us brought up the subject of a new name in my preparation for baptism, and by the time I asked about it, it was too late.

That was nobody's fault: it is just that we both had our own expectations and had made the assumption that the other person was thinking the same thing.  However, the lesson here is that, if you are considering taking a new name upon reception into the Church, you should make a point of discussing this with your priest.  Do not assume anything.

As it happens, my parish priest had commissioned for me a lovely icon of St Cyprian, holding a scroll with a quotation that I myself chose from his writings.  Smiley

In the Greek use, anyone who does not bear the name of a Saint celebrates on All Saint's Day.
What do they do at Communion when the priest asks for the Saint's name?

The priest doesn't ask for the saint's name.  He isn't giving Communion to the saint: he is giving Communion to the communicant, so it is the communicant's name for which he asks.

M
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« Reply #107 on: December 13, 2012, 12:36:27 PM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.
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« Reply #108 on: December 13, 2012, 01:04:04 PM »

Holy Roman Emperor - Che...oh..wait....



What's wrong with him?
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« Reply #109 on: December 14, 2012, 12:14:48 AM »

Holy Roman Emperor - Che...oh..wait....



What's wrong with him?

Well, he wasn't as eastern friendly as the Ottonians, but nothing much other than that, and flioque, but that's a minor issue before the 12th century.

Do you have a link for a larger image of St. Henry?
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« Reply #110 on: December 14, 2012, 02:13:47 AM »

Well, he wasn't as eastern friendly as the Ottonians.

Do you have a link for a larger image of St. Henry?

Thou shalt not confuse Orthodoxy with politics of Roman Empire.

Unfortunately no. I copied it from here and the site doesn't seem have any larger versions.
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« Reply #111 on: February 02, 2013, 09:11:52 PM »


Has a discussion been had here on the boards about the logic of taking new saints names? My "saints" name is Gregory, for St. Gregory of Nyssa.  Of course, I find the practice quite beautiful.

However, I always find it odd when I hear of Orthodox folks (layfolk, priests, monks, etc.) in African nations, Indian, Japanese, etc...with a name like Alexi, Constantine, etc.

Shouldn't there be a process by which new ethnic names can be allowed amongst clergy and others?  Is it not a bit troublesome that all Orthodox who take xian names end up with essentially Greek-ish or Slavic sounding names, for the most part? 

This is less about the sound of the names, than it is about what I see as a kind of soft ethno-theological colonialism.
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« Reply #112 on: February 02, 2013, 09:42:13 PM »

oops.
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« Reply #113 on: February 02, 2013, 10:02:07 PM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?
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« Reply #114 on: February 05, 2013, 01:24:14 AM »


Has a discussion been had here on the boards about the logic of taking new saints names? My "saints" name is Gregory, for St. Gregory of Nyssa.  Of course, I find the practice quite beautiful.

However, I always find it odd when I hear of Orthodox folks (layfolk, priests, monks, etc.) in African nations, Indian, Japanese, etc...with a name like Alexi, Constantine, etc.

Shouldn't there be a process by which new ethnic names can be allowed amongst clergy and others?  Is it not a bit troublesome that all Orthodox who take xian names end up with essentially Greek-ish or Slavic sounding names, for the most part? 

This is less about the sound of the names, than it is about what I see as a kind of soft ethno-theological colonialism.

Hmmm…not entirely sure what the objection is here. The Latins give baptismal names. Even Buddhists give special religious names. Most people I know like the practice. I never heard anyone complain about reactionary neo-colonialism.
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« Reply #115 on: February 05, 2013, 01:50:38 AM »

My Priest told me that I could pick my own Patron as long as he approved and thought that the Saint had something in common with me. I knew from day one though that it would be St. Augustine of Hippo, however, St. James of Jerusalem would be a close second; I find myself similar to him as well. I like how James was so hyperdox and strict on adhering to the faith.
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« Reply #116 on: February 05, 2013, 05:06:09 AM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?

What's so surprising?
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« Reply #117 on: February 05, 2013, 05:07:11 AM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?

What's so surprising?

Nothing.  I am just curious.
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« Reply #118 on: February 05, 2013, 05:08:54 AM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?

What's so surprising?

Nothing.  I am just curious.

But about what?
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« Reply #119 on: February 05, 2013, 05:14:35 AM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?

What's so surprising?

Nothing.  I am just curious.

But about what?

The portion I bolded.  I have not heard this before and am genuinely curious.  If it is true, I want to read up on it a little bit.  I think it is a very nice thought.  Is this accepted throughout Orthodoxy?
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« Reply #120 on: February 05, 2013, 09:31:53 AM »


Hmmm…not entirely sure what the objection is here. The Latins give baptismal names. Even Buddhists give special religious names. Most people I know like the practice. I never heard anyone complain about reactionary neo-colonialism.
Sure, as I said, I think it's beautiful.  I'm just saying that it's a shame that so many cultures across the world end up taking a name that isn't even remotely related to their culture.

Why should a Kenyan priest be named Demitrios? 

The more I think about it, the more I see that the Copts and many of the indigenous Holy Land Orthodox don't have this problem as much, since the Church grew into their culture from a very early period.

But it seems that there should be some flexibility on names, even with bishops.  You might not think so, but it's very important to a culture to hear themselves (granted, an elevated version of themselves) when it comes to issues like this. 
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« Reply #121 on: February 05, 2013, 10:28:03 AM »


Hmmm…not entirely sure what the objection is here. The Latins give baptismal names. Even Buddhists give special religious names. Most people I know like the practice. I never heard anyone complain about reactionary neo-colonialism.
Sure, as I said, I think it's beautiful.  I'm just saying that it's a shame that so many cultures across the world end up taking a name that isn't even remotely related to their culture.

Why should a Kenyan priest be named Demitrios? 

The more I think about it, the more I see that the Copts and many of the indigenous Holy Land Orthodox don't have this problem as much, since the Church grew into their culture from a very early period.

But it seems that there should be some flexibility on names, even with bishops.  You might not think so, but it's very important to a culture to hear themselves (granted, an elevated version of themselves) when it comes to issues like this. 

Greek names are commonplace anyway, like Ted is short for Theodore, etc.  A lot of Greeks in the US use an Americanized version of their name, Bess for Vasiliki, etc. 

There are Greeks who don't have the name of a saint, and it is said their goal should be to make that a saint's name. 

From an Orthodox info site:

"...The traditional Catechetical texts on Baptism date to the first four centuries of Christianity and are called collectively, in Greek, 'Katechetikai Diatribai.' There are literally scores of works, both by Eastern and Western Fathers, that address the Baptismal and mysteriological traditions of the Church. Let us simply quote an excellent work by Metropolitan Augoustinos of Florina, Eis ten Theian Leitourgian, Praktikai Homiliai (Athens, 1977), in which he summarizes one aspect of the catechetical instructions in the Early Church:

'...In the ancient Church, the Church of the first centuries of Christianity, ...when the catechumens had been taught all that they were to learn, their instructors would take them back to the Bishop, and the Bishop would recommend that they change their pagan names and adopt Christian ones; these names were to remind them of holy personages or virtues (e.g., Agapios, from agape, 'love ...).'"

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« Reply #122 on: February 05, 2013, 10:33:49 AM »

Here's another snippet from the same site to a different query:

In placing such great emphasis on this tradition and in expressing our regret that so many converts to the Orthodox Church ignore it—see, for example, our remark in this regard about Frank Shaeffer in the foregoing question—, we mean no disrespect. Rather, our comments are centered on the concern that we have for the cultivation of a genuine Orthodox spirit in the West, and especially in America. It is essential, indeed, that converts take the name of an Orthodox Saint, use it in all circumstances, and begin their journey towards spiritual maturity with this spiritual weapon in their basic arsenal of safeguards against sin and spiritual delusion. Such an act of humility and spiritual submission was so important to St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco, a man committed to the rebirth of Orthodoxy in the West—even to the point of such an excess as experimentation with the Western Rite, which he deeply regretted in later life—that he refused to commune converts who used their pre-Orthodox names or ethnic Orthodox who dishonored the names of their patron Saints by using impious diminutives and nicknames.
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« Reply #123 on: February 05, 2013, 10:48:06 AM »

I'm aware of the practice.  I'm also aware that there is not total agreement at the parish level about how to use the Orthodox name in convert life.  I am communed as Gregory.  My family and friends still call me Lee.  I am usually referred to as Lee Gregory by many in my parish.  Frankly, I don't care.

But I'm still uncomfortable with the dearth of indigenous African (non-Coptic) and East Asian names from which those folks can choose.  There has to be a better mechanism to use in order to "open up" new names for converts in these nations.

Some folks might not understand why this matters, but it does.  Especially if the Church is trying to make more inroads into counties like Kenya or Japan....an intelligent, culturally proud Kenyan is going to occasionally have some difficulty going by "George" -- and why shouldn't he, given the history of colonialism in the continent?
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« Reply #124 on: February 05, 2013, 11:29:23 AM »

Some folks might not understand why this matters, but it does.  Especially if the Church is trying to make more inroads into counties like Kenya or Japan....an intelligent, culturally proud Kenyan is going to occasionally have some difficulty going by "George" -- and why shouldn't he, given the history of colonialism in the continent?

I've met a Kenyan priest named George. 3rd generation Orthodox.
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« Reply #125 on: February 05, 2013, 11:38:59 AM »

Some folks might not understand why this matters, but it does.  Especially if the Church is trying to make more inroads into counties like Kenya or Japan....an intelligent, culturally proud Kenyan is going to occasionally have some difficulty going by "George" -- and why shouldn't he, given the history of colonialism in the continent?

I've met a Kenyan priest named George. 3rd generation Orthodox.

Don't miss the overarching point I'm making.
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« Reply #126 on: February 05, 2013, 07:08:46 PM »

I'm aware of the practice.  I'm also aware that there is not total agreement at the parish level about how to use the Orthodox name in convert life.  I am communed as Gregory.  My family and friends still call me Lee.  I am usually referred to as Lee Gregory by many in my parish.  Frankly, I don't care.

But I'm still uncomfortable with the dearth of indigenous African (non-Coptic) and East Asian names from which those folks can choose.  There has to be a better mechanism to use in order to "open up" new names for converts in these nations.

Some folks might not understand why this matters, but it does.  Especially if the Church is trying to make more inroads into counties like Kenya or Japan....an intelligent, culturally proud Kenyan is going to occasionally have some difficulty going by "George" -- and why shouldn't he, given the history of colonialism in the continent?

It's nice you're concerned about the feelings of possible converts to Orthodoxy, but if we all used history and our own cultural background as a standard we could find a reason to all hate each other forever, and never be anywhere close to God.  Just ask the Chinese about how intelligent and culturally proud the Japanese are, for instance.  Colonialism is a method of wealth extraction for the benefit of the metropole, which still goes on today in various guises.  This does not seem to be the Orthodox missionary agenda, and one would hope a person would realize that before they ever got remotely close to converting.

I guess a person has to decide what is more important to them, and as you've stated yourself, they don't have to use their baptismal name for day to day affairs.  As far as I know it isn't a Tradition, but people far more holy and knowledgeable than I have said it is a good idea.  Some people only use their Baptismal name when they take Communion and Confession.  Conversion doesn't require throwing off one's culture, which is probably impossible anyway.  It can sanctify and improve that culture though.

Changing names has a long tradition even in Judaism.  Years ago I read somewhere there is a belief, I don't know where it comes from, but if you change your name, you change your fate.  An elderly Jewish man explained this as he had come close to death, and when he survived, he changed his name, and many of his priorities in life changed as well. 

It may help people to leave behind their old way and take up Christ's Way. 

Anyway, it seems like it bothers you, and that's the way it is until you decide that other people can make decisions for themselves, and no one is holding a gun to their head to convert and take the name Polyeuctus or Thalelaeus or Audifax or Phileortus.

And who know, maybe they will be moved by God to love their saint and be so happy to bear their name, and try all the more to not sully their good name.   With God, all things are possible.
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« Reply #127 on: February 07, 2013, 10:33:05 AM »

I'm aware of the practice.  I'm also aware that there is not total agreement at the parish level about how to use the Orthodox name in convert life.  I am communed as Gregory.  My family and friends still call me Lee.  I am usually referred to as Lee Gregory by many in my parish.  Frankly, I don't care.

But I'm still uncomfortable with the dearth of indigenous African (non-Coptic) and East Asian names from which those folks can choose.  There has to be a better mechanism to use in order to "open up" new names for converts in these nations.

Some folks might not understand why this matters, but it does.  Especially if the Church is trying to make more inroads into counties like Kenya or Japan....an intelligent, culturally proud Kenyan is going to occasionally have some difficulty going by "George" -- and why shouldn't he, given the history of colonialism in the continent?

One possibility is that if we were to canonize some African saints,  we could use their given names rather than their Christian names. This is the case, for example, with St. Vladimir, who received the Christian name Basil.
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« Reply #128 on: February 07, 2013, 11:13:36 AM »

I'm aware of the practice.  I'm also aware that there is not total agreement at the parish level about how to use the Orthodox name in convert life.  I am communed as Gregory.  My family and friends still call me Lee.  I am usually referred to as Lee Gregory by many in my parish.  Frankly, I don't care.

But I'm still uncomfortable with the dearth of indigenous African (non-Coptic) and East Asian names from which those folks can choose.  There has to be a better mechanism to use in order to "open up" new names for converts in these nations.

Some folks might not understand why this matters, but it does.  Especially if the Church is trying to make more inroads into counties like Kenya or Japan....an intelligent, culturally proud Kenyan is going to occasionally have some difficulty going by "George" -- and why shouldn't he, given the history of colonialism in the continent?

One possibility is that if we were to canonize some African saints,  we could use their given names rather than their Christian names. This is the case, for example, with St. Vladimir, who received the Christian name Basil.
A very reasonable approach
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« Reply #129 on: February 07, 2013, 11:20:35 AM »

When I converted to the catholic church, I was asked to take a saint name from the day I was taken into the church and chose Johannes after one of the Vietnam martyrs in the 18th century.

I do have new name in mind for the due time to come, but the priest might have other plans for me.
Time will tell.
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« Reply #130 on: February 08, 2013, 12:26:15 AM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?

What's so surprising?

Nothing.  I am just curious.

But about what?

The portion I bolded.  I have not heard this before and am genuinely curious.  If it is true, I want to read up on it a little bit.  I think it is a very nice thought.  Is this accepted throughout Orthodoxy?
I guess not. Embarrassed
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« Reply #131 on: February 22, 2013, 05:30:50 PM »

If you already have a Saint's name, it's probably best to keep that name. After all, that Saint has been praying for you for your whole life. Why turn your back on him now? Ultimately, though, you should follow the advice of the priest who is Baptizing you.

I have never heard of this before.  Can you provide information on this for me to read?

What's so surprising?

Nothing.  I am just curious.

But about what?

The portion I bolded.  I have not heard this before and am genuinely curious.  If it is true, I want to read up on it a little bit.  I think it is a very nice thought.  Is this accepted throughout Orthodoxy?
I guess not. Embarrassed
Sorry it took a long time to respond; I hadn't been checking this thread. It's just something I was told during my catechumenate. It seems to make sense to me; if you're named after a particular saint, then that saint is your patron whether you like it or not.
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« Reply #132 on: February 22, 2013, 06:19:16 PM »

I hope I will help and not make new problems Tongue

In Greece

1) the name Christos with accent at i is common (Christ is Christos with accent at o), for women is Christina  with accent at second i. Also we have the name Christoforos

2) we baptize children with ancient names also, we had problems in past with this but finally we had told that we can do it in the hope that he or she would become a Saint (my nephew has the ancient name of my mother and we had her vow (I hope is the correct word for tama)) to baptize her in a monastery because of a dream. (well many ancient names have  feast-days someway even Aphrodite or Athina, names from ancient greek goddesses Tongue)

3) We don't use the word saint for the archangels usually, I search in google to see about this and I found a church who use the word saint, but I don't think anybody use it as we don't use the word saint for Maria the mother of Jesus.

4) for some reason the monks in monasteries many times choose to change their names  in strange uncommon names  we don't know Tongue
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« Reply #133 on: February 23, 2013, 02:25:21 AM »

I have a friend named Electra, whose mother is Melpomeni (but also goes by Anna), both names appear to be the legacies of Greek naming conventions, and so get perpetuated from generation to generation.  But I find, in reading the most ancient of the Church Fathers, lists of very early Martyrs who bore pre-Christian names, and who's ti say that among that sacred throng there might not have been at least one Electra or Melpomeni?
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« Reply #134 on: February 23, 2013, 03:02:44 AM »

I have a friend named Electra, whose mother is Melpomeni (but also goes by Anna), both names appear to be the legacies of Greek naming conventions, and so get perpetuated from generation to generation.  But I find, in reading the most ancient of the Church Fathers, lists of very early Martyrs who bore pre-Christian names, and who's ti say that among that sacred throng there might not have been at least one Electra or Melpomeni?

According to namedays.gr, St. Melpomeni is commemorated on September 1.  There is no St. Elektra.
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« Reply #135 on: February 23, 2013, 07:14:12 AM »

There are 40 virgin-martyrs commemorated on September 1. Most of them have "ancient" names, such as Melpomeni, Antigone, Aphrodite, Euterpe, Cleopatra, etc. Aside from this group, there is a multitude of saints, male and female, who are known by their ancient names.
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« Reply #136 on: April 11, 2013, 01:38:15 PM »

My parents gave me a Christian middle name, despite not raising me in any Christian tradition. When it came time for me to "choose" my Christian name, I was relieved that the choice had already been made for me. Smiley Finally, after all these years, I know now why I carry that name with me...
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« Reply #137 on: June 05, 2013, 11:38:25 AM »

I have 3 names and all of them are name of saints as I've recently found out. Should I choose freely 1 of the 3 to venerate and on which feast day to celebrate? 1 name is Per, which apparently is an adaption of St. Petros into ancient nordic language which I wasnt aware of before Smiley
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« Reply #138 on: June 05, 2013, 03:07:49 PM »

Shamati, where do you live? Maybe we can understand each other.  Smiley
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« Reply #139 on: July 17, 2013, 01:30:40 AM »

I will most certainly discuss with my Priest....so am not looking for a hard and fast 'rule', rather more opinions and thoughts...


As is probably apparent my first name is the female version of 'pick a Dionysus, any Dionysus'...and there is one small mention of an actual Denise on Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter,_Andrew,_Paul,_and_Denise

My middle name is also appropriate, and perhaps a bit easier to find things to identify with as there are enough Mary/Maria's.

Is there something wrong with still being baptized with my actual first name, realizing its rare and/or male (and i wont have much to identify with) and then -also- have a special fondness/relationship with a Mary/Maria?

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« Reply #140 on: July 17, 2013, 01:38:06 AM »

I will most certainly discuss with my Priest....so am not looking for a hard and fast 'rule', rather more opinions and thoughts...


As is probably apparent my first name is the female version of 'pick a Dionysus, any Dionysus'...and there is one small mention of an actual Denise on Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter,_Andrew,_Paul,_and_Denise

My middle name is also appropriate, and perhaps a bit easier to find things to identify with as there are enough Mary/Maria's.

Is there something wrong with still being baptized with my actual first name, realizing its rare and/or male (and i wont have much to identify with) and then -also- have a special fondness/relationship with a Mary/Maria?

For a baptism name, Dionysia Maria would work.   Smiley
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« Reply #141 on: July 17, 2013, 01:39:03 AM »

There is more than one Saint Dionysia who could serve as your patron.
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« Reply #142 on: July 17, 2013, 01:42:22 AM »

I will most certainly discuss with my Priest....so am not looking for a hard and fast 'rule', rather more opinions and thoughts...


As is probably apparent my first name is the female version of 'pick a Dionysus, any Dionysus'...and there is one small mention of an actual Denise on Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter,_Andrew,_Paul,_and_Denise

My middle name is also appropriate, and perhaps a bit easier to find things to identify with as there are enough Mary/Maria's.

Is there something wrong with still being baptized with my actual first name, realizing its rare and/or male (and i wont have much to identify with) and then -also- have a special fondness/relationship with a Mary/Maria?

For a baptism name, Dionysia Maria would work.   Smiley

Only if the priest is prepared to baptize someone in two names. I know that among the thirty-odd Orthodox priests in the city where I live, representing every Orthodox nation/culture, the ones who would do so are practically non-existent.
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« Reply #143 on: July 17, 2013, 01:47:09 AM »

My wife was not baptized with two names, but the priest that usually communed her used two names when doing the "Servant of God N. partakes of..." thing. Not sure when or where the line would be drawn when it comes to such things.
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« Reply #144 on: July 17, 2013, 07:06:32 PM »

There is more than one Saint Dionysia who could serve as your patron.

Do you happen to have sources or a reference for them? 

*makes a pretty please face*
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« Reply #145 on: July 17, 2013, 07:41:29 PM »

There is more than one Saint Dionysia who could serve as your patron.

Do you happen to have sources or a reference for them?  

*makes a pretty please face*

There's a Martyr Dionysia, feastday December 6. At present, I have no further information on her.  Sad
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« Reply #146 on: July 17, 2013, 07:55:48 PM »

I suspect that would be this one..

Born to the nobility. Widow. Sister of Saint Dativa. Mother of Saint Majoricus the Martyr. Martyred during the persecutions of the Arian Vandal king Huneric. A witness records that as she was being scourged, she called to her son not to lose his faith.

which I have only seen referenced in Catholic sources, despite her being martyred in 484.  I have seen the 'The Martyrs of Africa, who suffered during the Vandal persecution (429 and following)'  but never her by name.

I obviously need a better book of saints. Wink

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« Reply #147 on: July 17, 2013, 09:57:59 PM »

I suspect that would be this one..

Born to the nobility. Widow. Sister of Saint Dativa. Mother of Saint Majoricus the Martyr. Martyred during the persecutions of the Arian Vandal king Huneric. A witness records that as she was being scourged, she called to her son not to lose his faith.

which I have only seen referenced in Catholic sources, despite her being martyred in 484.  I have seen the 'The Martyrs of Africa, who suffered during the Vandal persecution (429 and following)'  but never her by name.

I obviously need a better book of saints. Wink



There is no such thing, I'm afraid. I have at my disposal church calendars from several Orthodox traditions, and several synaxaria (lists of saints, with a short summary of their lives), and it's still little more than a drop in the bucket. The sheer multitude of named saints would require a large bookcase to even begin to house the volumes which would document them.
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« Reply #148 on: September 07, 2013, 01:05:47 PM »

Speaking of baptism names and saints, does anyone know of an Orthodox Saint Laurence/Lawrence or Lauren besides Laurence of Canterbury, Laurence of Rome, or Lawrence of Kaluga? 
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« Reply #149 on: September 07, 2013, 01:11:49 PM »

Speaking of baptism names and saints, does anyone know of an Orthodox Saint Laurence/Lawrence or Lauren besides Laurence of Canterbury, Laurence of Rome, or Lawrence of Kaluga? 

St. Lavrentiy of Chernigov
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« Reply #150 on: September 07, 2013, 02:06:27 PM »

Speaking of baptism names and saints, does anyone know of an Orthodox Saint Laurence/Lawrence or Lauren besides Laurence of Canterbury, Laurence of Rome, or Lawrence of Kaluga? 

St. Lavrentiy of Chernigov

Thanks!
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« Reply #151 on: February 04, 2014, 12:05:36 PM »

Hey, I'm not sure if this is the best place to ask, but does anybody know when Abba Joseph of Panephysis's feast is? I've been patron-shopping over the last few weeks, and I like one of his sayings that was quoted in our bulletin and around the web and in a mewithoutYou song, but I can't find anything beyond it. I suppose there are a few other Josephs, but I'm rather curious about this one.
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« Reply #152 on: February 06, 2014, 12:08:49 AM »

My first name is not at all a Christian name, but at my Baptism I was given the name "Paul". I thought this meant that my Patron Saint was St Paul the Apostle, but I had no connection to him whatsoever, not out of disrespect or a lack of admiration, but because I just didn't feel that he was the Saint God intended to be my patron. So I looked at other possible St Pauls and discovered St Paul the Simple, a Monk and Disciple of St Anthony the Great. After reading his Story, I felt an instant connection with him and felt that he was definitely someone that I could aspire to be like; His simplicity, his humility, his obedience (all of which I lack) and also his wife Cheated on him, and when he walked in and discovered the affair, he laughed it off and let it go. Anybody who knows me will know I have an intense fear of being cheated on and when it appeared to happen to me before, I took it very badly and just wished that I wasn't so affected by it. So St Paul seems to definitely have chosen me and I thank God for this!
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« Reply #153 on: February 06, 2014, 12:43:25 AM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?
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« Reply #154 on: February 06, 2014, 12:51:43 AM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?


http://oca.org/saints/lives?q=joseph

Just a quick check has quite a few other Joseph's.

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« Reply #155 on: February 06, 2014, 01:05:51 AM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

There are dozens of saints called Joseph. Here are just a few:

Joseph the All-Comely (the youngest of the sons of Jacob); Apostle Joseph Bar-Sabbas of the Seventy; Joseph of Volotsk; Joseph of Optina; Joseph, Bishop of Thessaloniki; Joseph, Patriarch of Constantinople.
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« Reply #156 on: February 07, 2014, 11:09:45 AM »

The intercessions of these two are needed in the current political situation:
St Joseph of Aleppo
St Joseph of Damascus
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« Reply #157 on: February 07, 2014, 11:40:42 AM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.


This.   I would have to -convince- Father that there was some pressing reason for me not to just take on a Dionysius (there are a few) as my name, because my name derives from it.

The notion that people need to take on a wild and crazy sounding new name to signal some internal change...is flawed for folks who HAVE a saint's name...
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« Reply #158 on: February 07, 2014, 02:56:33 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.


This.   I would have to -convince- Father that there was some pressing reason for me not to just take on a Dionysius (there are a few) as my name, because my name derives from it.

The notion that people need to take on a wild and crazy sounding new name to signal some internal change...is flawed for folks who HAVE a saint's name...

Taking a Saint's name in itself makes no sense unless your name is Ihatejesuschrist.

This is a tradition.
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« Reply #159 on: February 07, 2014, 03:07:26 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.


This.   I would have to -convince- Father that there was some pressing reason for me not to just take on a Dionysius (there are a few) as my name, because my name derives from it.

The notion that people need to take on a wild and crazy sounding new name to signal some internal change...is flawed for folks who HAVE a saint's name...

Taking a Saint's name in itself makes no sense unless your name is Ihatejesuschrist.

This is a tradition.


Fine.

within the tradition established that adult converts take on a Saint's name, chosing a new name if one already has the name of a Saint as one's legal birth name, is generally avoided.



Thus John does not decide to become Parthenius because that sounds 'cooler' than the name he was graced with at birth, and would somehow make one seem more pious or whatever other motivation.....

However, there is nothing -wrong- with traditions that make no logical sense, as long as they do not become the focus of Faith or Belief.


Better now?  Wink
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« Reply #160 on: February 07, 2014, 04:58:44 PM »

Just saw this was Convert Issues.

Sorry Thomas.

Please no one quote my unedited post.

Thanks.
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« Reply #161 on: February 07, 2014, 07:00:07 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

There are dozens of saints called Joseph. Here are just a few:

Joseph the All-Comely (the youngest of the sons of Jacob); Apostle Joseph Bar-Sabbas of the Seventy; Joseph of Volotsk; Joseph of Optina; Joseph, Bishop of Thessaloniki; Joseph, Patriarch of Constantinople.

My legal name is a well known saint, but my Greek Orthodox priest recommended that I take another name.
So, at his recommendation, Maria became my "chalice'" name.
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« Reply #162 on: February 14, 2014, 12:09:17 AM »

Thanks everyone. I will read up on these saints.
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« Reply #163 on: February 14, 2014, 02:32:54 PM »

The problem these days is that Saint's names have been on the decline in America for a long time, either made up names or non-Christian ones have become popular. When I worked in Family Court we used to have a monthly list of the strangest names. A little girl named 'Tasmanian Devil' was the all time winner - or loser if you think about it.

I agree with the idea that if you carry the name of a Saint and that Saint's name has been part of your family that it is wrong to take on a 'more Orthodox' sounding name. That is the path to excessive externalism and it is one with a lot of dangers. (Not all succumb, I know that, I am giving my opinion and I am generalizing.)
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« Reply #164 on: February 14, 2014, 02:35:42 PM »

Nicholas or Mary, take your pick.
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« Reply #165 on: February 14, 2014, 03:33:41 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

There are dozens of saints called Joseph. Here are just a few:

Joseph the All-Comely (the youngest of the sons of Jacob); Apostle Joseph Bar-Sabbas of the Seventy; Joseph of Volotsk; Joseph of Optina; Joseph, Bishop of Thessaloniki; Joseph, Patriarch of Constantinople.

My legal name is a well known saint, but my Greek Orthodox priest recommended that I take another name.
So, at his recommendation, Maria became my "chalice'" name.

This stuff smacks of gnosticism. And I don't use that word all over the place like some here.

EDIT: Thomas: if this inappropriate for Convert Issues, I apologize and feel free to nuke it. I try to be on my best behavior here. I am not sure exactly to what degree disagreement is allowed in Covert Issues, especially when posts veer toward the unChristian.
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« Reply #166 on: February 14, 2014, 04:58:27 PM »

The problem these days is that Saint's names have been on the decline in America for a long time, either made up names or non-Christian ones have become popular. When I worked in Family Court we used to have a monthly list of the strangest names. A little girl named 'Tasmanian Devil' was the all time winner - or loser if you think about it.

I agree with the idea that if you carry the name of a Saint and that Saint's name has been part of your family that it is wrong to take on a 'more Orthodox' sounding name. That is the path to excessive externalism and it is one with a lot of dangers. (Not all succumb, I know that, I am giving my opinion and I am generalizing.)

I 'lucked out' by semi random, in that my name was not intended as a Christian or Saints name...yet it qualifies. My middle name would also qualify.

Of course the whole thing really was my father pulling a fast one on my mother.....by rejecting all her naming choices for me, and somehow 'adoring' the feminine version of his own name.   laugh


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« Reply #167 on: February 14, 2014, 05:31:18 PM »

My name is the feminine form of a male saint's name, so I wonder if that would work.
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« Reply #168 on: February 14, 2014, 05:34:14 PM »

My name is the feminine form of a male saint's name, so I wonder if that would work.


That's what mine is...

and someone baptized in my parish recently also used a feminine form of a male saint.....

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« Reply #169 on: February 14, 2014, 07:07:38 PM »

My name is the feminine form of a male saint's name, so I wonder if that would work.


That's what mine is...

and someone baptized in my parish recently also used a feminine form of a male saint.....



Perfectly acceptable (and extremely common) in Greek tradition, less so in Russian, where one's patron saint "should" be the same sex as yours.
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« Reply #170 on: February 14, 2014, 08:24:42 PM »

well the best thing I hear from a priest about accepting ancient greek non christian names is something like "you never know if this person with the non christian name become a saint in his/her life"
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« Reply #171 on: February 20, 2014, 11:20:23 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

I have a question. St. Ignatius of Antioch was the first saint I encountered on my journey to the Orthodox Church. I read all his letters and even though I disagreed with some things, it really shed a new light on how I viewed the early Church. His passion for Christ reminded me so much of St. Paul. He had a really big impact on me. Would it be ok if I chose him as my patron saint? I know I should ask a priest this.
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« Reply #172 on: February 20, 2014, 11:22:26 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

I have a question. St. Ignatius of Antioch was the first saint I encountered on my journey to the Orthodox Church. I read all his letters and even though I disagreed with some things, it really shed a new light on how I viewed the early Church. His passion for Christ reminded me so much of St. Paul. He had a really big impact on me. Would it be ok if I chose him as my patron saint? I know I should ask a priest this.
He's a Saint of the Church.  So, it's ok.  Smiley  Talk to your priest when the time comes.
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« Reply #173 on: February 20, 2014, 11:39:28 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

I have a question. St. Ignatius of Antioch was the first saint I encountered on my journey to the Orthodox Church. I read all his letters and even though I disagreed with some things, it really shed a new light on how I viewed the early Church. His passion for Christ reminded me so much of St. Paul. He had a really big impact on me. Would it be ok if I chose him as my patron saint? I know I should ask a priest this.

St. Ignatius and St. Paul are my favorites as well. Neither, alas, are the male version of my given name.  Wink
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« Reply #174 on: February 20, 2014, 11:40:18 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

I have a question. St. Ignatius of Antioch was the first saint I encountered on my journey to the Orthodox Church. I read all his letters and even though I disagreed with some things, it really shed a new light on how I viewed the early Church. His passion for Christ reminded me so much of St. Paul. He had a really big impact on me. Would it be ok if I chose him as my patron saint? I know I should ask a priest this.
He's a Saint of the Church.  So, it's ok.  Smiley  Talk to your priest when the time comes.

Thanks.  Smiley
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« Reply #175 on: February 21, 2014, 12:39:52 PM »

Does anyone know of any saints named Joseph? I know of Ss. Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Arimathea, and Joseph the Hymnographer. Any others? Also, could I take a new name?

Most priests will advise taking a new name only if there is no Orthodox saint with your birth name.

I have a question. St. Ignatius of Antioch was the first saint I encountered on my journey to the Orthodox Church. I read all his letters and even though I disagreed with some things, it really shed a new light on how I viewed the early Church. His passion for Christ reminded me so much of St. Paul. He had a really big impact on me. Would it be ok if I chose him as my patron saint? I know I should ask a priest this.

St. Ignatius and St. Paul are my favorites as well. Neither, alas, are the male version of my given name.  Wink

What?  You didn't want to change your legal name to Ignacia or Paula/Paulina?  It would've been cool*!

*Not really, just very hyperdox.
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« Reply #176 on: March 28, 2014, 02:27:19 AM »

I'm not saying I am converting, but theoretically if I were to, my name is a bit problematic.

My evangelical family gave me a pagan name, Keenan. It's traditional in my family, but still.  Cry Then on the eve of my baptism in the R. Catholic Church I was undergoing a major spiritual crisis. The few days before my baptism I was all over the place in terms of temptation and had huge waves of apathy towards being baptized. Thanks and praise to God I stuck with it, but I grabbed any name I could think of for my baptismal name and ended up with Ignatius of Antioch.

I've only read a few of his writings. I don't know how I feel about it. I wouldn't change my first name out of respect for my parents, just as I would feel disrespectful to Ignatius of Antioch's memory if I were to ever hide or change it.
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« Reply #177 on: March 28, 2014, 02:33:19 AM »

I'm not saying I am converting, but theoretically if I were to, my name is a bit problematic.

My evangelical family gave me a pagan name, Keenan. It's traditional in my family, but still.  Cry Then on the eve of my baptism in the R. Catholic Church I was undergoing a major spiritual crisis. The few days before my baptism I was all over the place in terms of temptation and had huge waves of apathy towards being baptized. Thanks and praise to God I stuck with it, but I grabbed any name I could think of for my baptismal name and ended up with Ignatius of Antioch.

I've only read a few of his writings. I don't know how I feel about it. I wouldn't change my first name out of respect for my parents, just as I would feel disrespectful to Ignatius of Antioch's memory if I were to ever hide or change it.

If you were to convert to Orthodoxy, I can't see any problem in you keeping the name Ignatius as your "church name" and your patron saint.
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« Reply #178 on: March 28, 2014, 02:36:22 AM »

Indeed. We have multiple people at my parish where this is the case.
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« Reply #179 on: March 28, 2014, 02:45:38 AM »

Good to know. He really is an amazing saint. I'm going to thoroughly study his letters.
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« Reply #180 on: May 05, 2014, 06:10:37 PM »

I guess I'm lucky, I have an easy choice: St. Cecilia

She was the saint name I chose for my RC confirmation. 
She is a pre-schism saint.
Her name is similar, phonetically, to mine.
She is, among other things, the patron saint of music/musicians (I sing, play instruments).
Her feast day is, coincidentally, on my birthday (November 22)

I can't see making another choice.
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« Reply #181 on: May 07, 2014, 02:53:49 PM »

I am coming from a traditional Catholic background.

I am torn between St. Martin of Tours and St. Alexis Toth. I like St. Martin because he is a great model of love and holiness, and he is western. I like St. Alexis because my name is Alex, and he is a convert from Catholicism, even though he was Eastern already.
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« Reply #182 on: May 07, 2014, 03:00:25 PM »

Who was your RC patron saint?
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« Reply #183 on: May 07, 2014, 03:01:40 PM »

Who was your RC patron saint?

Francis of Assisi. And I believe his baptismal saint was St. Martin of Tours.
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« Reply #184 on: May 07, 2014, 03:03:38 PM »

And my mothers side of the family is from Wilkes Barre, as is St. Alexis Toth.
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« Reply #185 on: May 07, 2014, 03:22:49 PM »

It seems like you can't go wrong either way. Smiley
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« Reply #186 on: May 07, 2014, 03:23:42 PM »

Would it be importing Roman Catholic novelty to take both? Alexis-Martin?
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« Reply #187 on: May 07, 2014, 03:45:22 PM »

I don't think there would be anything wrong about it. It's just not part of our tradition.
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« Reply #188 on: May 07, 2014, 03:51:30 PM »

Who was your RC patron saint?

Francis of Assisi. And I believe his baptismal saint was St. Martin of Tours.

I'm on to you... 
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« Reply #189 on: May 07, 2014, 03:53:13 PM »

Would it be importing Roman Catholic novelty to take both? Alexis-Martin?

I suppose you could do that.  I didn't know that a double name was a particularly RC thing, though. 

If you don't mind my asking, is your name "Alex" or "Alexander"? 
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« Reply #190 on: May 07, 2014, 03:53:56 PM »

I guess I'm lucky, I have an easy choice: St. Cecilia

...

I can't see making another choice.

I like her.  I like most of the popular Roman virgin-martyrs. 
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« Reply #191 on: May 07, 2014, 03:54:10 PM »

My wife had two names in that manner when she converted (Mary-Cecilia). Cecilia was the name given to her by her Roman Catholic family, and she took the name Mary (of Egypt) when she became Orthodox, but kept both names for purposes of church stuff, and even in her personal life.
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« Reply #192 on: May 07, 2014, 03:54:25 PM »

Who was your RC patron saint?

Francis of Assisi. And I believe his baptismal saint was St. Martin of Tours.

I'm on to you... 

You were St. Martin's baptismal Saint?
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« Reply #193 on: May 07, 2014, 04:17:31 PM »

Would it be importing Roman Catholic novelty to take both? Alexis-Martin?

I suppose you could do that.  I didn't know that a double name was a particularly RC thing, though. 

If you don't mind my asking, is your name "Alex" or "Alexander"? 


Alexander
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« Reply #194 on: May 07, 2014, 07:04:25 PM »

Would it be importing Roman Catholic novelty to take both? Alexis-Martin?

Yes, it would. Orthodox have a single baptismal name, and a single patron saint appointed at baptism.

Of course, that doesn't stop anyone from having particular personal devotion to more than one saint, neither should it.
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« Reply #195 on: May 09, 2014, 12:13:11 PM »

I think I have decided on St. Alexis Toth. His name is similar enough to mine, and he's a logical patron for my family, since my grandparents are from Wilkes-Barre. Even though he was already Eastern, he too was a convert from Catholicism.
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“Hold firmly that your faith is identical to that of the ancients, deny this and you dissolve the unity of the Church.” -St. Thomas Aquinas

http://www.amazon.com/His-Broken-Body-Understanding-Catholic/dp/0615183611

http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/the-banished-heart-9780567442208/
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« Reply #196 on: June 04, 2014, 11:29:15 AM »

Would it be importing Roman Catholic novelty to take both? Alexis-Martin?

Yes, it would. Orthodox have a single baptismal name, and a single patron saint appointed at baptism.

Of course, that doesn't stop anyone from having particular personal devotion to more than one saint, neither should it.

Oh, to have the space and money for an icon of each of the saints I have really grown to like haha.
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« Reply #197 on: June 20, 2014, 09:25:28 AM »

If you are an Orthodox Christian, you ARE a Saint, so just keep the name you have, it is already a Saint's name. Strive to honor Christ and the Trinity with your name. It may not be in the "Saint's Hall of Fame" yet, but you never know.
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