Poll

Do you believe that the acount of genesis in the Old testament should be taken literally?

Yes
55 (15.5%)
No
137 (38.7%)
both metaphorically and literally
162 (45.8%)

Total Members Voted: 354

Author Topic: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy  (Read 376432 times)

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Offline Jonathan Gress

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5760 on: February 20, 2015, 08:03:48 AM »
Sorry guys dont have the time to read through the whole thread but did we reach a general consensus of how we should view evolution?

If we have what was the conclusion?

LMFAO

Offline Niko92

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5761 on: February 20, 2015, 09:00:44 AM »
Sorry guys dont have the time to read through the whole thread but did we reach a general consensus of how we should view evolution?

If we have what was the conclusion?

LMFAO

Believe me after reading through some of it there is that much variety in opinions that the question isnt even funny lol

Offline Jonathan Gress

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5762 on: February 20, 2015, 09:12:40 AM »
Sorry guys dont have the time to read through the whole thread but did we reach a general consensus of how we should view evolution?

If we have what was the conclusion?

LMFAO

Believe me after reading through some of it there is that much variety in opinions that the question isnt even funny lol

I think that would be "no".

Offline Niko92

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5763 on: February 20, 2015, 09:17:38 AM »
Fair call.

Whats your opinion on evolution if you dont mind me asking?

Offline WPM

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5764 on: February 20, 2015, 09:30:51 AM »
The scientific process of life.

Offline Jonathan Gress

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5765 on: February 20, 2015, 09:38:19 AM »
Fair call.

Whats your opinion on evolution if you dont mind me asking?

It's all over the place. You can check my posting history to get a sense of my confusion. My current position is "believe the Church, but don't get into arguments you can't win".

Offline Fabio Leite

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5766 on: February 20, 2015, 04:44:16 PM »
Evolution concerns the material cause, creation concerns the formal cause.
Many energies, three persons, two natures, one God, one Church, one Baptism.

Offline ilyazhito

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5767 on: March 05, 2015, 10:09:51 PM »
Then how do you reconcile both? I'm a little rusty on my Scholastics.

Offline Rhinosaur

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Re: Creationism, Evolution, and Orthodoxy
« Reply #5768 on: March 05, 2015, 10:15:48 PM »
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/05/world/jawbones-discovery-fills-barren-evolutionary-period.html?_r=0

Quote
On the morning of Jan. 29, 2013, Chalachew Seyoum was climbing a remote hill in the Afar region of his native Ethiopia, his head bent, eyes focused on the loose sediment. The site, known as Ledi-Geraru, was rich in fossils. Soon enough, he spotted a telltale shape on the surface — a premolar, as it turned out. It was attached to a piece of a mandible, or lower jawbone. He collected other pieces of a left mandible, and five teeth in all.

Mr. Seyoum, a graduate student in paleoanthropology at Arizona State University, had made a discovery that vaulted evolutionary science over a barren stretch of fossil record between two million and three million years ago. This was a time when the human genus, Homo, was getting underway. The 2.8-million-year-old jawbone of a Homo habilis predates by at least 400,000 years any previously known Homo fossils.

More significant, scientists say, is that this H. habilis lived only 200,000 years after the last known evidence of its more apelike predecessors, Australopithecus afarensis, the species made famous by “Lucy,” whose skeleton was found in the 1970s at the nearby Ethiopian site of Hadar.