Author Topic: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...  (Read 4299 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline truthstalker

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 166
I heard this hymn most beautifully sung on You-tube.  This is my very poor translation, if I got it right:

Chiist rose from the dead
By death he struck death
And to those in the grave
He freely gives life.


(Christos anesti ek nekroon
thanato thanaton patisas
kai tois en tois mnimisi
zoen charisamenos)

patisas+ is it actually the aorist active participle of pato?

Is this a legitimate translation?

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

Offline Veniamin

  • Fire for Effect!
  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 3,372
  • St. Barbara, patroness of the Field Artillery
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2009, 10:12:20 PM »
The usual translation is:

Christ is risen from the dead, trampling down death by death, and upon those in the tombs bestowing life.

It's the Paschal troparion and is sung dozens of times on Pascha itself, then throughout the Paschal season.
Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl. ~Frederick the Great

Offline ialmisry

  • There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 39,003
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2009, 10:24:31 PM »
I heard this hymn most beautifully sung on You-tube.  This is my very poor translation, if I got it right:

Chiist rose from the dead
By death he struck death
And to those in the grave
He freely gives life.


(Christos anesti ek nekroon
thanato thanaton patisas
kai tois en tois mnimisi
zoen charisamenos)

patisas+ is it actually the aorist active participle of pato?

Is this a legitimate translation?

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

St. John of Damascus (see the icon on the left).  He also arranged the Pascha service, including writing the paschal verses: here's beautiful version in Romanian:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLquakalcvU

The beginning video is St. John writing.

He also wrote the Funeral Service.
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline Fr. George

  • formerly "Cleveland"
  • Administrator
  • Stratopedarches
  • *******
  • Posts: 20,221
  • May the Lord bless you and keep you always!
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2009, 11:01:49 PM »
I heard this hymn most beautifully sung on You-tube.  This is my very poor translation, if I got it right:

Chiist rose from the dead
By death he struck death
And to those in the grave
He freely gives life.


(Christos anesti ek nekroon
thanato thanaton patisas
kai tois en tois mnimisi
zoen charisamenos)

patisas+ is it actually the aorist active participle of pato?

Is this a legitimate translation?

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

Just to add to Isa's and Veniamin's comments: patisas is walking on, trampling underfoot, stepping over, etc.
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
Met. Meletios of Nikopolis & Preveza, from his ordination.

Offline mike

  • The Jerk
  • Stratopedarches
  • **************
  • Posts: 22,289
  • Faith: Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Makurian Orthodox
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2009, 08:07:06 AM »
Thanks from transliteration. I always wanted to find it on myself but never had time.

Offline Fr. George

  • formerly "Cleveland"
  • Administrator
  • Stratopedarches
  • *******
  • Posts: 20,221
  • May the Lord bless you and keep you always!
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2009, 08:16:46 AM »
After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

It is such a gem of a hymn; a summary of what we believe about the Resurrection in such a short format.  It is done countless times during the Paschal season: during the week after Pascha, it is chanted 10 times at the beginning of every service, 4 times at the end (once as part of the Doxastikon, and 3 times on its own), during Matins it is chanted an additional 24 times (3 times after each ode of the Canon), and during Liturgies it is chanted an additional 8 times (4 before the entrance, 1 after, 1 after communion, and 3 instead of "Blessed be the name of the lord").  Then, at every service after Bright/Renewal Week, it is chanted three times at the beginning of each service.
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
Met. Meletios of Nikopolis & Preveza, from his ordination.

Offline Heorhij

  • Merarches
  • ***********
  • Posts: 8,576
    • Mississippi University for Women
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2009, 08:46:39 AM »
Mike, and the correct pronounciation is "ke tis en tis mnimasi" ("ai" is pronounced like "e" and "oi" like "i"). Here's how Divna Ljubojevic sings it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7tKexc4wSM
Love never fails.

Offline truthstalker

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 166
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2009, 09:06:01 AM »
After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

It is such a gem of a hymn; a summary of what we believe about the Resurrection in such a short format.  It is done countless times during the Paschal season: during the week after Pascha, it is chanted 10 times at the beginning of every service, 4 times at the end (once as part of the Doxastikon, and 3 times on its own), during Matins it is chanted an additional 24 times (3 times after each ode of the Canon), and during Liturgies it is chanted an additional 8 times (4 before the entrance, 1 after, 1 after communion, and 3 instead of "Blessed be the name of the lord").  Then, at every service after Bright/Renewal Week, it is chanted three times at the beginning of each service.

A little enthusiastic about it, are the Orthodox?  I've seen video of it sung solo by a man, and a woman, and various choirs of nuns and monks in Greece and Serbia.

The pronounciation is a little different than I was taught. They have "kai" rhyming with hay; I thought it rhymed with sky. This threw me until I found it written out, and then I still used someone else's translation.
And tis for tois, where I would have it sound like toys.  I was hoping I could follow the Greek at a service, but I wonder.

Offline Fr. George

  • formerly "Cleveland"
  • Administrator
  • Stratopedarches
  • *******
  • Posts: 20,221
  • May the Lord bless you and keep you always!
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2009, 11:26:43 AM »
A little enthusiastic about it, are the Orthodox?  I've seen video of it sung solo by a man, and a woman, and various choirs of nuns and monks in Greece and Serbia.

Quite enthusiastic, I dare say.  But it still is not as popular as the #1 Orthodox prayer of all the divine Services, and of the Divine Liturgy: "Lord, have mercy."

The pronounciation is a little different than I was taught. They have "kai" rhyming with hay; I thought it rhymed with sky. This threw me until I found it written out, and then I still used someone else's translation.
And tis for tois, where I would have it sound like toys.  I was hoping I could follow the Greek at a service, but I wonder.

You were probably taught Erasmian pronunciation of Ancient Greek.  The ai in "kai" is pronounced like the e in pet.  And the tis pronunciation for tois is the right way (at least for New Testament, Patristic, and Modern Greek).
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
Met. Meletios of Nikopolis & Preveza, from his ordination.

Offline witega

  • Is it enough now, to tell you you matter?
  • OC.net guru
  • *******
  • Posts: 1,614
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2009, 11:46:05 AM »
A little enthusiastic about it, are the Orthodox?  I've seen video of it sung solo by a man, and a woman, and various choirs of nuns and monks in Greece and Serbia.

Most definitely. At my parish, for Pascha, we sing it in English, Greek, Slavonic, Romanian, Spanish, Arabic and Japanese. Then generally just in English, Slavonic and Greek throughout the rest of the Paschal period.

Quote
The pronounciation is a little different than I was taught. They have "kai" rhyming with hay; I thought it rhymed with sky. This threw me until I found it written out, and then I still used someone else's translation.
And tis for tois, where I would have it sound like toys.  I was hoping I could follow the Greek at a service, but I wonder.

If your Greek training is a typical Koine Greek class then you'll catch some words, but no you won't really be able to follow actual spoken Greek.
Ariel Starling - New album

For it were better to suffer everything, rather than divide the Church of God. Even martyrdom for the sake of preventing division would not be less glorious than for refusing to worship idols. - St. Dionysius the Great

Offline Orthodox11

  • Archon
  • ********
  • Posts: 2,999
Re: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2009, 12:11:19 PM »
St. John of Damascus

Really? I thought it would be older. How does one account for the hymn being sung in all the OO churches? Do they admit to St. John's authorship or do they have an alternate source?

Or do you mean he was just the composer of the melody?
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 12:17:30 PM by Orthodox11 »