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Author Topic: Why do we not see nearly as many miracles present day?  (Read 996 times) Average Rating: 0
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thismanisdan
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« on: June 17, 2009, 10:42:13 AM »

 I'll admit this is also a bit of a conversion issue as well (although I do realize it doesn't totally hinge on that fact) but why do you guys think that miracles these days are not nearly as prominent as in the early church days? Has God pulled back showing signs of His power to a lesser extent so that we will have to go forward in faith rather than by witnessing His works or could it maybe be that we aren't learned in the practices and faith levels that contribute to attaining them? I really love that verse in the gospels about having the faith even the size of a mustard seed and I think about it often. Am I taking it out of context or was Christ referring to doing great works with a pure and genuine faith?

 I hope this makes sense.

I also do realize we do receive many miracles in the modern day but I feel as though with the expansion of The Church they should become more and more prominent.
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Bogoliubtsy
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 11:08:29 AM »

Partly because science and advances in knowledge explain what we formerly considered miraculous.
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2009, 11:15:11 AM »


Miracles happen every day!  All around us.

The ones that get noticed are the weeping icons, visions, the Jordan running "backwards", the Holy Fire, etc.  We have a number of weeping icons in my area, that are presented to the faithful at certain times of the year.

"Smaller" miracles that are not on a grand worldwide scale happen every single day.  We just need to open our eyes and not only notice them, but appreciate and give thanks for them.

However, don't base your faith on the observance of miracles to assure you that the Faith is real. 

Blessed are those who have not seen, and yet believe.

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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 11:25:26 AM »

I believe we do but these miracles are not reported to be such because they are dismissed by nonbelievers and/or overly logical people to be something that science needs to explain and has the ulitmate authority.  For example, this past weekend, I had the wonderful opportunity to pray before the Weeping Theotokos Icon of Sitka.  Prayers through this particular icon have been known to help cancer patients recover and go into complete remission.  I told this to my father and he just rolled his eyes.  He's Lutheran, not Orthodox, so even within Protestant denominations, miracles are readily dismissed as something that can naturally be explained.

Also, and I don't mean to sound like a conspiracy theorist,  but a lot of such miracles are just simply not reported on because of society's fear and hatred towards Christ and His Church.
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2009, 11:26:51 AM »

Partly because science and advances in knowledge explain what we formerly considered miraculous.

When the Albanian Theotokos here began to weep and exude myrrh, the press asked "have you tested the tears?"

The priest responded "they did that to the icon in New York a few years back, and they found out that the liquid had the same chemical composition as human tears.  What did that prove?  Either you believe, or you don't."

Only an evil generation seeks a sign, and this generation is quite cynical and hard to impress.  There have been several miracle cures, for instance, which the most modern medicine have proved are without explanation.

And btw, the Church has always been skeptical of miracles. The Fathers warn, if you see one, ignore it.  When our Arab Theotokos began to weep here, the first thing the bishop did was not to venerate it, but to exorcise it, so as to make sure that another "miraculous" power wasn't at work.
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2009, 11:31:44 AM »

However, don't base your faith on the observance of miracles to assure you that the Faith is real. 

Blessed are those who have not seen, and yet believe.



I remember when I became Orthodox, that I prayed that I NOT see a miracle before my Faith was sure. When I saw my first weeping icon (and to be honest, I was more impressed by the miles long line to come see it, across from a mall during Christmas season: people were parking in mall and coming to the Church.  The Church, btw, is St. Nicholas), and remember staring and saying to myself, "OK, now what?"
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2009, 11:39:27 AM »

Partly because science and advances in knowledge explain what we formerly considered miraculous.

When the Albanian Theotokos here began to weep and exude myrrh, the press asked "have you tested the tears?"

The priest responded "they did that to the icon in New York a few years back, and they found out that the liquid had the same chemical composition as human tears.  What did that prove?  Either you believe, or you don't."

Only an evil generation seeks a sign, and this generation is quite cynical and hard to impress.  There have been several miracle cures, for instance, which the most modern medicine have proved are without explanation.

And btw, the Church has always been skeptical of miracles. The Fathers warn, if you see one, ignore it.  When our Arab Theotokos began to weep here, the first thing the bishop did was not to venerate it, but to exorcise it, so as to make sure that another "miraculous" power wasn't at work.

I certainly don't doubt the miraculous. However, a good chunk of what was considered signs, miracles, etc. is explainable today through advances in what we've learned about the natural world.
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2009, 01:24:00 PM »

Partly because science and advances in knowledge explain what we formerly considered miraculous.

When the Albanian Theotokos here began to weep and exude myrrh, the press asked "have you tested the tears?"

The priest responded "they did that to the icon in New York a few years back, and they found out that the liquid had the same chemical composition as human tears.  What did that prove?  Either you believe, or you don't."

Only an evil generation seeks a sign, and this generation is quite cynical and hard to impress.  There have been several miracle cures, for instance, which the most modern medicine have proved are without explanation.

And btw, the Church has always been skeptical of miracles. The Fathers warn, if you see one, ignore it.  When our Arab Theotokos began to weep here, the first thing the bishop did was not to venerate it, but to exorcise it, so as to make sure that another "miraculous" power wasn't at work.

I certainly don't doubt the miraculous. However, a good chunk of what was considered signs, miracles, etc. is explainable today through advances in what we've learned about the natural world.

like what?
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