OrthodoxChristianity.net
December 22, 2014, 02:04:31 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Who stole Harry Potter's phoenix?  (Read 1837 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
sinjinsmythe
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 737



« on: June 20, 2003, 05:03:21 PM »

Who stole Harry Potter's phoenix?

Posted: June 20, 2003
1:00 a.m. Eastern
By Caryl Matrisciana
-¬ 2003 WorldNetDaily.com


Shattering news from my homeland England came over the BBC News Online service recently, reporting the theft of 8,000 Harry Potter books despite the "unprecedented security around the launch" of book No. 5 in the seven-part Harry Potter series.

The new books, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" were stolen on Sunday and "anyone caught trying to sell - or even buy" these books "could face criminal charges" reports Stephen Dowling of the BBC World Edition News.

Earlier this month another theft took place when a forklift driver stole pages of the new book and offered them to national newspapers.

The astonishing news does nothing but further hype the worldwide release on the Summer Solstice, June 21, of author J.K. Rowling's latest smash hit. Never before in publishing history has a book had these strict embargoes that prohibit any type of pre-glimpse before it goes on sale at 0001 British Standard Time on Saturday, June 21.

Britain's Amazon.com, the Internet booksellers, have 300,000 copies securely tucked away in a dedicated warehouse in the English countryside ready to send to U.K. buyers on its Saturday due date. U.K. book chain Waterstones children's book buyer said, the "books are arriving in sealed boxes. We need to keep them locked off from the shop floor until 12 o'clock. We have to make sure the customers can't get to them, and staff can't get to them, apart from the one person who has the key."

Even review copies are under strict supervision curtailing media attempts to pass judgment before Sunday, though BBC News Online boasts they aim to publish one of the U.K.'s first reviews on Saturday. Good luck to those having to speed-read the almost 900 pages to meet publishers' deadlines. Translators were hoping to get pre-release copies to translate it into 55 languages for global distribution into over 200 countries, but they too must wait along with the rest of us.

The wait for a new book has been 3 years for Potter fans since the July 2000 release of book No. 4. Fans did however get their Harry-fix through the Warner Brothers blockbuster movies based on the first two books. Warner Bros. proudly flaunted that film No. 1 based on book No. 1 was "an accurate portrayal of witchcraft."

The young Wiccan, Harry Potter, then only 11 years old, has taken the world by storm. According to the Pagan Federation of England, the interest of thousands of teens to learn more about witchcraft has been stimulated through Harry Potter and television programs like "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Sabrina The Teenage Witch."

Pacific News Service reports that the Spanish speaking world, where Harry's sales top the best-seller lists in Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, have Latin American critics complaining "that the world of magic through which Harry Potter travels is a metaphor for the New Age philosophy that is hostile to the Christian faith, and thus Harry Potter is an assault on Latin American values."

In the Siberian City of Novosibirsk, after the release of book No. 4, Harry Potter fans were believed to have been poisoned after drinking a "magic potion" inspired by the Potter books. Local police suspected older children had stolen copper sulfate from a school lab and fed it to 23 young children, who were taken to hospital, after a Potter initiation ceremony.

While critics accuse me of failing to realize that Rowling's use of witchcraft in the Potter series is only a literary device, these examples show only too well that children believe the so-called "fantasy" magic of Harry's world to be real and, in a craving to control their lives, long for Harry's power to be real to them.

Harry's author, J.K. Rowling, now richer than the queen and the wealthiest woman in show business, told Malcolm Jones in a Newsweek interview, "I get letters from children addressed to Professor Dumbledore (headmaster at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, the book setting), and it's not a joke, begging to be let into Hogwarts, and some of them are really sad. Because they want it to be true so badly they've convinced themselves it's true."

J.K. Rowling promised "the books are getting darker ... Harry's going to have quite a bit to deal with as he gets older. Sorry if they get too scary!" In a Newsnight interview on BBC2 TV last week, she told how she "cried after killing off a 'significant' character" in her new fifth book.

The first three books were heavily promoted through the American school system by the American publisher Scholastic Inc., which has also provided school-curriculum materials for over 80 years. It seems interesting that while the teaching of traditional values based on Christian ethos has been removed from schools through reading the Bible in class, saying prayers or posting the Ten Commandments, Harry Potter, based on the religious teachings of occult professors and Wiccan students at a school of witchcraft and wizardry can be read aloud in American classrooms.

J.K. Rowling admits her books teach "morality," but many argue it is an anti-Christian morality that encourages children to lie, cheat and steal in Harry fashion. In the books, when Harry gets caught, he gets rewarded for his dishonest behavior. This worldview of shifting morality supports much of the content of Outcome Based Education and Goals 2000 taught in public schools today. Perhaps that's why the Potter books based on relativism, reincarnation type life after death, and other pagan values are endorsed by educators and mainstream society. It appears paganism is mainstream and mainstream has gone pagan.

Some 8.5 million copies of "The Order of the Phoenix" have been printed for the U.S. market, and millions will see the cover of the colorful phoenix rising above the flames of a red hot fire on Saturday, but what is its significance? In Barbara Walker's "Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets," she says, "The phoenix is part of Egyptian mythology and identified with the bennu bird, a spirit associated with the phallic obelisk. He rose to heaven in the form of the Morning Star, like Lucifer, after his fire-immolation of death and rebirth. He embodied the sacred king cremated to be reborn".

Is it a coincidence that Adolph Hitler also used the phoenix as his symbol of reincarnation and "born again" power to resurrect the Second Reicht to his Third Reicht in an attempt to bring about the New World Order? His Nazi uniform boldly emblazoned both the phoenix and another powerful occult symbol, the lightning bolt. Interestingly enough, the so-called descending phallus of heaven, the lightning bolt believed to impregnate Mother Earth, or the sea-womb with life, is the curse mark Harry's arch enemy, the Evil Lord Voldemort scarred Harry's forehead with when he murdered Harry's parents on Halloween night.

Today, millions of children take Harry's curse mark on their own foreheads to show their loyalty to Harry. The Bible teaches that at the ruling of the One World leader in the end times, the whole world will take "the mark of the beast" on their foreheads to show their allegiance to the world dictator. Are our children, and the global child, being conditioned for something much bigger than even we understand?

Logged

Life is just one disappointment after another.
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,443



« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2003, 11:47:58 AM »

Sinjinsmythe, are you posting this stuff because you agree with it?

Because it is, after all, balderdash. The Nazis used the eagle as a symbol, not a phoenix. I don't think the phoenix has anything to do with Egypt, but frankly, I'm reaching the point where I don't feel compelled to bother checking anymore, because when someone can't figure out that lightning bolts are symbols of power everywhere, they've lost their powers of discernment. I looked in the first book last night, and it does not say that Harry's parents were killed on Hallowe'en (and at any rate, the whole Hallowe'en thing is American anyway).

This pathetic excuse for a news story is fabricated piecemeal out of a bunch of unrelated and lame sources. Warner Bros. has no standing to speak to the accuracy of HP's depiction of witchcraft (and in fact, HP's witchcraft is nothing at all like modern Wicca). The books, of course, do not depict witchcraft as religion anyway, but as a natural and capricious talent. I haven't seen "Buffy" or "Sabrina" but TV programs featuring benevolent witches etc. go back decades. I doubt the truth of the Siberian report, but if it's true it's not from the books. I doubt that Rowling is "the richest woman in show business" and no attempt is made to prove this. Barbara Walker is not a credible source and her analysis is blathering nonsense.

This "article" is a particularly stupid editorial trying to pass itself off as honest news. What's interesting is that the Washington Post had an article today on the impact of the HP phenomenon. Among other effects, they note:

Quote
GÇó Harry Potter has people talking about religion. Whether readers believe in God or magic or nothing at all, they are debating the religious aspects of Rowling's works.

Some people find goodness and mercy in the books; others only sin and Satan. Most detractors object to the books' celebration of witchcraft. There have been reports of: churches in New Mexico and Pennsylvania burning the books; local school officials in Arkansas and Michigan banning them; folks in other places, including South Carolina and Tennessee, trying to get them banned. Amazon.com offers a video titled "Harry Potter: Witchcraft Repackaged -- Making Evil Look Innocent." Preachers have railed; educators wailed.

For the past four years, according to Larra Clark of the American Library Association, the Harry Potter books have been at the very top of the list of those that people have tried to ban. It's extremely rare that books by the same author "would have that kind of prominence," Clark says.

On the other hand, reading expert Trelease says Harry Potter "is doing God's work." Rowling's books are energizing reticent readers and will "someday enable them to read the Bible," he says.

To Connie Neal, author of "What's a Christian to Do With Harry Potter?" and "The Gospel According to Harry Potter: Spirituality in the Stories of the World's Most Famous Seeker," all of this debate is healthy.

"It gets families talking about spiritual things," says Neal, who lives with her husband and three teenagers near Sacramento.

"Kids are curious about supernatural power," she says. "They're scared. They know there's good and evil."

The books have been banned and burned by people who don't see the good in them, she says. "If you want to look for witchcraft in this, I know you can find it. But I propose that if I read Harry Potter, looking for parallels to the Gospel, I can show you specific Bible parallels."

Sacrifice, for example. That is, she says, "a basic Gospel message." At one point in the story, Potter's mother jumps in front of the curse of death and dies in Harry's place. "That's what broke the curse," Neal says.

The books are "so full of biblical allusions and good potential moral lessons."

Neal believes that Rowling has given parents and children a way to talk about good and evil and the choices that must be made in life. The books are "filled with kids who want to be good."

She adds, "Harry and the kids in Gryffindor -- sometimes by making good choices, sometimes bad choices -- grow in goodness."

The books, she says, "have got us arguing about religion in good ways."

The full article can be found at the Post website.
Logged
Hypo-Ortho
Guest
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2003, 12:15:59 PM »

Be forewarned: If you come to visit me you're going to watch the latest Harry Potter episode on my huge TV screen in DVD.  I buy the DVD's within the first week of their release before the price jumps sky high.  If I don't like them a few years down the line or if I tire of them, well, I can always give them to my grandkids or sell them on Ebay.  If you teach your kids good Christian values at home and watch the episodes with the kids, ask questions, let them ask questions, it can be an enriching experience.  We don't live in a plastic bubble.

Hypo-Ortho
« Last Edit: June 21, 2003, 01:58:06 PM by Hypo-Ortho » Logged
sinjinsmythe
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 737



« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2003, 02:55:41 PM »

Keble, I only post it because I know there are people in the board who are interested in this. If it bothers you that I am posting articles like this, you do not have to read them.
Logged

Life is just one disappointment after another.
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,443



« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2003, 03:58:34 PM »

While I'm at it:

Quote
Some 8.5 million copies of "The Order of the Phoenix" have been printed for the U.S. market, and millions will see the cover of the colorful phoenix rising above the flames of a red hot fire on Saturday, but what is its significance?

We have our copy, and this description is totally inaccurate. There is no phoenix and no flames on the cover. And it isn't colorful. The only spot that isn't blue is a small patch on the back for the UPC. In fact, the front cover is precisely the image of Harry that I've been seeing around the net for at least a week.

And yes-- I do mind when people post articles like this that are full of vaguely hysterical misinformation. If people are "interested" in them, it matters a great deal why they are interested. I read some of this junk on a "know the enemy" basis, the way I keep a copy of the Book of Mormon in the basement. If you disagree with something someone says, you need to get it right about what they actually say. But to actually believe what you are reading is another matter.

This story spreads false information; willfully or negligently or ignorantly, in the end it ceases to matter. You cannot serve the Truth by spreading claims that are not true. And the very site from which this comes itself stands in falsehood. It claims to be a news service, but the article in question is not news. It is a propaganda piece, and it is full of information which either wasn't or possibly couldn't be verified, or which comes from sources which themselves spread misinformation. It does not deserve confidence or repetition.

Of crouse the moral stance of the books is not beyond discussion. But it needs to be discussed for what it really is, and for what the world really is. If they can't even get the cover of the book right, how can you trust them about what's inside?
Logged
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,443



« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2003, 11:37:59 AM »

I must make a partial retraction. The British editions, it appears, do have a phoenix on the cover. (For some reason British adults get a different, more subdued version; American adults have to make do with the Scholastic edition.)

I've finished it, by the way.
Logged
Frobie
Quasi Vero Monaco
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 633


Rublev's Trinity


WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2003, 11:57:20 AM »

What did you think of it, Keble? How does it rate compared with the other four books?
Logged
Keble
All-Knowing Grand Wizard of Debunking
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,443



« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2003, 11:36:32 PM »

I'm going to start a new thread for the review proper.
Logged
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.056 seconds with 34 queries.