Author Topic: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives  (Read 17973 times)

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Offline Thomas

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Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« on: February 18, 2008, 12:32:29 PM »
The Orthodox Study Bible is out and on an initial peruse of the Bible I note the following.  It is a nice read with large type easier to read for those like myself who are older.  Articles are interesting.  I was surprised it did not have a concordance frequently found in most  study Bibles. It has a nice dictionary at the end, a study for home use Lectionary, and continues to have an abbreviated morning and evening prayer office to use in the back of the bible. Its use of the holy fathers seems to be relegated to citing the Orthodox Church teaching and then citing the Church fathers who support that interpretation. It does include all Orthodox  Canon that is generally accepted by both Slavic and Byzantines Churches. The Psalter reads still like the  New King James but does have the numbering corrected to  Orthodox practice, without a line by line comparison, I can not determine how the translation falls out.  The text is easily readable and grammar syntax looks good throughout.

I assume that as in its predecessor the New Testament Study Bible there will be some controversy but in all it is a good starting place for an English version of the Septuagint for Orthodox Bible studies, but don't throw away those commentaries that you may own by the Holy Fathers. As a starting place it is a good start, hopefully in future editions  there will be additional material and cometary added.

Thomas
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Offline PeterTheAleut

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2008, 03:03:05 PM »
So tell us a bit about it.  Who publishes it?
The St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (http://www.saaot.edu/aboutus.php)

Quote
How much does it cost?
$49.99 USD before any retailer markdowns

General Information:
Old Testament Text: St. Athanasius Academy Septuagint (© 2008 by St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology)
New Testament Text:  New King James Version (© 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.)

Quote
What are your first impressions?
An Orthodox translation of the Old Testament from the Septuagint certainly has to be considered an excellent place to start.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 03:53:40 PM by PeterTheAleut »
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Offline jnorm888

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2008, 11:57:19 PM »
I don't like the quality of the paper. I miss the scripture refences in the middle of the page.

But outside of that I like it.

I really love the notes. Some of the notes and commentary of the New Testament were redone. I thought the notes were really good and alot deeper.


But I only had it for two days, but so far I like it. They made use of 49 Church Fathers and Mothers(well, maybe one mother). They also made use of the 7 Church wide councils & the Churches Liturgical Calander.


This Study Bible is unique. It has a different feel than other Study Bibles. Maybe it's because they tried to stress the liturgical year. I don't know, but it is unique.

The Theme of this Study BIBLE focused on the TRINITY, The INCARNATION, The CHURCH, and God's call to live a Virtuous life.


It was cool to see how they pulled out from the Text these themes from Genesis to Revelations.






JNORM888
« Last Edit: February 19, 2008, 12:13:00 AM by jnorm888 »
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Offline sdcheung

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2008, 12:14:26 AM »
I don't like the quality of the paper.



JNORM888

whats wrong with the paper? is it bible paper? copier paper, laser printer paper?

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Offline Jakub

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2008, 12:19:54 AM »
I wonder if they will publish the OT by itself, already have a hard cover and leather editions...
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Offline PeterTheAleut

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2008, 12:34:23 AM »
whats wrong with the paper? is it bible paper? copier paper, laser printer paper?
I imagine Bible paper being a rather thin stock, thinner than what is used in most books.  If I'm right about what Bible paper is, then I would say this is what the OSB uses.
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Offline jnorm888

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2008, 02:59:18 PM »
whats wrong with the paper? is it bible paper? copier paper, laser printer paper?

The paper quality isn't as good as the New Testament OSB. Maybe the leather back will be different.
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Offline TinaG

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2008, 12:13:52 AM »
Not to sidetrack the discussion, but why do Bibles generally have very thin, delicate paper?  As much as they are handled and read (hopefully), why are they not generally printed with heavier, more durable stock?  Production costs or a way of keeping the thickness of the Bible a manageable size?
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Offline ytterbiumanalyst

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2008, 12:37:42 AM »
I imagine it's so you don't have to lug a forty-pound book to church every week.

Actually, a lot of my college literature texts had the same paper for a very similar reason.
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Offline Thomas

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2008, 09:23:19 AM »
Not to sidetrack the discussion, but why do Bibles generally have very thin, delicate paper?  As much as they are handled and read (hopefully), why are they not generally printed with heavier, more durable stock?  Production costs or a way of keeping the thickness of the Bible a manageable size?

Actually it is two fold:
1) the paper is thin and lightweight to hold down the weight on the  person who carries, reads, and handles the Bible
2) the paper is more durable and less prone to aging and becoming fragile (more easily torn or become yellow due to age) a plus in a bible that is used and read frequently. 

By the way if you are someone who likes to mark passages in scripture with highlighter, make sure to get a marker that is specifically made for Bibles as they will color only the surface and do not soak thru on the other side of the Bible page ruining the other page for future marking of significant passages.

Thomas
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Offline TinaG

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2008, 09:45:13 AM »
2) the paper is more durable and less prone to aging and becoming fragile (more easily torn or become yellow due to age) a plus in a bible that is used and read frequently. 

By the way if you are someone who likes to mark passages in scripture with highlighter, make sure to get a marker that is specifically made for Bibles as they will color only the surface and do not soak thru on the other side of the Bible page ruining the other page for future marking of significant passages.

You mean the thinner paper is actually stronger?  I suppose it does have a certain resilience.  Never thought of that but it makes sense. 

Thank you for the tip on highlighting Thomas.
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Offline jnorm888

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2008, 11:15:37 AM »
This is what I wrote on my blog about the full OSB.

http://ancientchristiandefender.blogspot.com/search/label/scripture

Quote
The Orthodox Study BIBLE

The New Full Orthodox Study Bible is out. I just got my hardback copy today. The quality of the paper isn't as good as the New Testament version that came out 15 years ago, but it's decent enough. I'm just happy that it finally came out.
This version of the OSB has a fresh English translation of the Septuaginet text. They used the Alfred Rahlfs edition of the greek text as the basis for the english translation. They also used Brentons british translation of the greek text as a reference. The Old Testament Masoretic text of the NKJV was used as a template. Meaning Thomas Nelson publishers allowed them to use their english wording of the Old Testament whereever the LXX and Masoretic text were in agreement. It has 49 books in the Old Testament(about 3 more than Rome's) and 27 books in the New Testament. Because the Old Testament is the LXX the placing of the books are gonna be where they were in the greek LXX. Psalms has an extra chapter in the LXX and the book of Daniel is slightly longer as well. 2nd Chronicles(2nd Paraleipomenon) is longer due to the prayer of Manasseh. The New Testament is the NKJV and is mostly the same as the previous study Bible except for the addition of more patristic quotes and liturgical reference marks.
The notes and commentary of the OSB emphasizes the major themes of the Christian Faith.
Primary attention was given to:
1.) The HOLY TRINITY
2.) The Incarnation
3.) The Centrality of the Church
4.) And the call to live a virtuous life
The Biblical interpretations of the Church Fathers of the first 1,000 years of the church was used as well as the 7 Ecumenical Councils. Also added was the liturgical and prayer cycle of the Church Calender. Certain scriptures are read during certain times of the Church year, and these are marked in the notes.
The preface shows a chart of the Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant old Testaments and it shows where they differ on certain points. The preface also shows the Patristic Fathers(They used about 49 different church fathers) and councils they quoted, as well as their abbreviations. They also give a brief run down of the Old Testament of the Early Church and of each book in the Bible(Both old and new) after that it ends with a short description of Church History. Starting with the New Testament era and ending with modern times and the Orthodox Church today.
Over all I'm just happy that it finally came out. Hopefully the leather back edition will have better quality paper.

For more information about the Full Orthodox Study Bible one can go to the Orthodox study website at:

http://orthodoxstudybible.com/



Also hear Father Gillquist talk about the full version of the OSB at this poodcast:

http://audio.ancientfaith.com/interviews/osb_pc.mp3

The combination of the LXX and textus receptus makes it easier to trace some of the New Testament quotes. I know in my study of Romans chapter 9 I noticed Paul quoting the lxx alot. Now I have a fresh english tranlation of the lxx to go to when trying to trace Old Testament quotes found in the New Testament.

JNORM888
« Last Edit: February 20, 2008, 11:19:08 AM by jnorm888 »
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http://ancientchristiandefender.blogspot.com/

Offline Fr. David

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2008, 03:43:38 PM »
My little review, which has some things in common with what's been mentioned already, is HERE.
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Offline ComingHome

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2008, 09:55:26 PM »
My new OSB just came in today.  I haven't had a lot of time to peruse it but so far so good.  I'm anxious to get a little more into it when time permits.

Offline ComingHome

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2008, 09:43:59 PM »
My wife got to looking at my Bible and now she has ordered one for herself also. 

Offline cizinec

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2008, 10:04:24 PM »
I haven't ordered one yet, but I'm going to.  The reviews look pretty good.  I suppose it will be a few years before we get anything better, as these are serious endeavors.  At least it's getting done in Engilsh!
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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2008, 10:15:21 PM »
My roommate was fortunate enough to get the last one last night (that's what I get for being late to Vesper's).  I've perused over it several times today and I love it!  Words cannot express how fortunate we English speakers are to have this in our arsenal of Spiritual Warfare!!  I really cannot wait to have my own, but in the meantime my roomie (who, for those of y'all who don't know, is none other than Nacho) has graciously kept it out on the dining room table.  

In addition to the request for a concordance and center column references, I'd like to request BIGGER PRINT.  If you don't currently require reading glasses, you will after reading a few chapters.  And for those of you hoping for better quality with the leather addition; it's really fine like onion paper.  And yes, it has the gold edging.  
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Offline falafel333

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #17 on: February 29, 2008, 12:17:57 AM »
Just got mine in the mail today and I got some quick questions:
What happened to 4 Maccabees?
I know that the text of the Old Testament from the NKJV was edited to conform to the Septuagint, does anyone know whether any editing was done to the text of the New Testament from the NKJV?
Were the deuterocanonical books translated from scratch or was an existing text edited to produce the current version?

Offline Fr. David

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #18 on: February 29, 2008, 05:37:09 PM »
As I understand it, 4 Maccabees is not uniformly accepted by the whole Church.  I do not know why, as I've never read it (just the first three), nor any reasons for its exclusion by some.

This was a translation from scratch of the whole Septuagint.  It is one of the first ones to come around in a long time, though the EOB is also a translation of the Church's text.

Also, there's Peter Papoutsis.

I've not examined either of these other works.
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Offline Orthodox11

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2008, 05:59:46 PM »
though the EOB is also a translation of the Church's text.

The EOB (at least for the moment) is just a modern language version of Brenton's translation, which for a number of reasons cannot be considered genuinely Septuagint.

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #20 on: February 29, 2008, 08:30:34 PM »
One thing I thing an Orthodox Study Bible should have, and I hope maybe will in later editions, is the definitions of the Seven Ecumenical Councils in an appendix, with supporting scriptural references.
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #21 on: February 29, 2008, 08:32:57 PM »
Just got mine in the mail today and I got some quick questions:
What happened to 4 Maccabees?
I know that the text of the Old Testament from the NKJV was edited to conform to the Septuagint, does anyone know whether any editing was done to the text of the New Testament from the NKJV?
Were the deuterocanonical books translated from scratch or was an existing text edited to produce the current version?

Actually, the Russian Church is the one Church (except, as always, the Ethiopians) that has 4 Maccabbees.  The Romanian Bible included it in the 17th cent. ed., but not the 20th cent. ed. (she went from slavocentric to grecocentric).

As I understand it, 4 Maccabees is not uniformly accepted by the whole Church.  I do not know why, as I've never read it (just the first three), nor any reasons for its exclusion by some.

It is available in the Oxford Study Bible, and worth the read.  It shows direct parallels to the thoughts of the Gospels (for instance, that the dead are alive to God, cf. 4Macc 16:25 "They knew also that those who die for the sake of God live in God, as do Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the patriarchs" and Mat. 22:32).
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 08:43:22 PM by ialmisry »
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline Ghazar

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2008, 02:31:02 AM »
Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

   If interested, I wanted to share this watershed moment of Christianity with all of you (something I have waited for most of my adult life):  The Publication of the first translation of the Orthodox Septuagint into modern English along with notes illuminating the ancient Orthodox Faith.

Some highlights of this Bible for me, as an Armenian Orthodox Christian, are:

1.  The numbering of the Psalms reflect the ancient Tradition of the Universal Church, as maintained traditionally by the Greek, Latin, Coptic, Syriac, Armenian, Slavic and other ancient Churches.

2.  The fuller Old Testament Canon including the book of 3 Maccabees, 1 & 2 Ezra, the Prayer of Manasseh and the 151st Psalm (which appear in ancient and modern Armenian Church Canons).  These books are not placed in an ostracized section (as in some Bibles), but in a Traditional, Canonical order reflecting their respective genre and meaning.

3.  The removal of a paragraph in the original Orthodox Study Bible (OSB) New Testament which called into question the Orthodoxy of the Oriental Orthodox Communion (including the Coptic, Syriac, Armenian and Indian Churches).  The OSB is now truly meant for the use of ALL ORTHODOX CHRISTIANS, and can even be very helpful for Eastern and Latin Catholics.

4.  The Septuagint (abbreviated LXX) was translated by Jews 200 years before Christ, roughly 600 years before St. Jerome's Latin Vulgate and 1000 years before the Hebrew Masoretic Text -the text which serves as the basis for ALL modern English Old Testament Translations whether Catholic or Protestant.  The Christological prophesies which are lost (or disorted) in the Masoretic are fully evident in the LXX.  This was the primary Old Testament of the great Fathers of the Church.

5.  Numerous notes from ancient Christian Fathers of the Church who's works were among the first to be translated into Armenian by our Holy Translators -following that of the Holy Scriptures (see the list of them below).

6.  Not only is the Septuagint the primary Text used by our Holy Translators Sahag and Mesrob to make the Armenian Version known as the "Queen of All Translations," but it was THE OLD TESTAMENT text used by the Apostles themselves as they were inspired by the Holy Spirit to write the New Testament. WHAT MORE COULD WE ASK FOR IN AN ENGLISH OLD TESTAMENT TRANSLATION???

7.  Based on the above this translation has the potential to become THE OFFICIAL ENGLISH translation of the Orthodox Church of Armenia in the U.S. and other English speaking countries.

Trusting in Christ's Inextinguishable Light
Sdn. Lazarus W. Der-Ghazarian

The OSB can be purchased on-line at:  http://orthodoxstudybible.com/

---------------------------

***Background on the Saint Athanasius Academy Septuagint (SAAS) and the Orthodox Study Bible from the editors:

THE FIRST EVER Orthodox Study Bible presents the Bible of the early Church and the Church of the early Bible.  Believers of the Orthodox Christian faith now have a clear and compelling study resource enabling them to delve into the riches of Holy Scripture.  Prepared by a pan-Orthodox team of scholars and pastors, the Orthodox Study Bile brings to one volume the words of Scripture and the understanding of those words form the earliest days of the Christian era.  More importantly, the Bible is a treasury of Christian commentary for all Christians of the twenty-first century.

The great voices of the historic Church were such luminaries as Ignatius of Antioch, Irenaeus of Lyons, Hippolytus, Athanasius, John Chrysostom, Nicholas of Myra, Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, John Cassian, John of Damascus, and Maximos the Confessor.  Grounded in the Scriptures and inspired by the Holy Spirit, these and numerous others like them were the teachers, preachers, pastors and defenders of the Truth of Christianity in the first millennium of Christian history.  These were the voice of early Christianity, the leaders of the Orthodox Church.

The Orthodox Christian faith is the face of the ancient Church to the modern world and is the second largest body of Christians in the world.  In this first of its kind study Bible, you'll find commentary from the ancient Christian perspective, with sources seldom cited in contemporary study Bibles, sources that shine with heavenly insight.  The OSB was prepared to make this treasury of biblical commentary available to Orthodox believers.  And abundance of additional helps and articles is provided to encourage Christians to become people of informed faith and people of prayer.

But this bible is not just for Orthodox Christians.  Countless otters will find the OSB an invaluable road map for their spiritual journey.  Those exploring Christianity for the first time and those Christians wanting to discover their own spiritual roots will see this Bible as a source of inspiration and challenge.

Features include:  Old Testament from the St. Athanasius Academy Septuagint with Deuterocanon (SAAS); New Testament from the New King James Version (NKJV); Insightful commentary drawn from the Christian writers and teachers of the first ten centuries after Christ; Introduction and outline to each book of the Bible; Helpful notes relating Scripture to seasons of Christian feasting and fasting; And exhaustive subject index to the study notes to facilitate Bible Study; Lectionary to guide your bible reading through the Church year; Morning and Evening prayers;  Supplemental Bible Study articles such as:  Overview of the Books of the Bible; The bible God's Revelation of Man; How to Read the Bible; Saints of the Old Testament; the Sermon on the Mount; Christology; Beautiful full color icons;

The last decade of the twentieth century saw an historic event.  In 1993, the Orthodox Study Bible :  New Testament and Psalms was released, the first English Bible with study material reflecting how the early Christians interpreted and applied the Bible to their lives.  Christians from both the Eastern and Western traditions found a source of Bible study that provided light for their spiritual journeys.   English-speaking Orthodox Christians -whether converts for from Greek, Russian, Arab, Serbian, Bulgarian, Coptic, Armenian or any other Eastern Orthodox parentage -found the biblical roots of their faith in words fresh and powerful. Christians from non-Orthodox traditions glimpsed a faith experience that rang true and enriched their won Christian experience.

The necessity of answering popular demand pressed upon the editors of the New Testament edition the task of preparing an edition of the Orthodox Study Bible with both the Old and New Testaments.  So they undertook the task of preparing a biblical text suitable for the purpose.  The decision was made that the notes and commentary which address the biblical text would emphasize the major themes of the Christian faith.

Thus, the notes give primary attention to:
1.  The Holy Trinity:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
2.  The Incarnation :  the Divine Son of God becoming Man
3.  The Centrality of the Church, the "dwelling place of God in the Spirit" (Eph 2:22)
4.  The Virtues:  God's call to His people to live righteous and holy lives in Christ.

To attain these goals, specific attention was given to the biblical interpretations of the Fathers of the ancient and undivided Church, and to the consensus of the Seven Ecumenical or Church-wide Councils of Christendom, held from the fourth to eighth centuries. Other helps were added to provide the Bible reader every opportunity to employ the Bible not only in study, but also in contemplative Bible reading and prayer.

The prayer of the editors and contributors of The Orthodox Study Bible is that it presents an understandable Bible text and commentary to (1) English-speaking Orthodox Christians the world over and to (2) non-Orthodox readers interested in learning more about the faith of the historic Orthodox Church.

"At last! A study Bible that integrates the Old Testament with the worshipping life of the Church Among the several approaches to the biblical text which Orthodoxy has manifested and permitted over the centuries literal, symbolic or a mix of both  this one follows the more symbolic tradition.  It's the only resource I know of that relates the Old Testament to the theology, liturgy, lectionary and Fathers of Christian antiquity.  Christians of all back grounds  -Orthodox, Catholic and Protestants- will see Christ as the key that unites the whole of Christian tradition through an integrated understand of its parts." -Bradley Nassif, Professor Biblical and Theological Studies, North Park University (Chicago).
« Last Edit: March 02, 2008, 02:36:58 AM by Ghazar »
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Rev. Sub-Deacon Lazarus Der-Ghazarian,
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Offline Ghazar

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2008, 02:42:22 AM »
Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

   If interested, I wanted to share this watershed moment of Christianity with all of you (something I have waited for most of my adult life):  The Publication of the first translation of the Orthodox Septuagint into modern English along with notes illuminating the ancient Orthodox Faith.

Some highlights of this Bible for me, as an Armenian Orthodox Christian, are:

1.  The numbering of the Psalms reflect the ancient Tradition of the Universal Church, as maintained traditionally by the Greek, Latin, Coptic, Syriac, Armenian, Slavic and other ancient Churches.

2.  The fuller Old Testament Canon including the book of 3 Maccabees, 1 & 2 Ezra, the Prayer of Manasseh and the 151st Psalm (which appear in ancient and modern Armenian Church Canons).  These books are not placed in an ostracized section (as in some Bibles), but in a Traditional, Canonical order reflecting their respective genre and meaning.

3.  The removal of a paragraph in the original Orthodox Study Bible (OSB) New Testament which called into question the Orthodoxy of the Oriental Orthodox Communion (including the Coptic, Syriac, Armenian and Indian Churches).  The OSB is now truly meant for the use of ALL ORTHODOX CHRISTIANS, and can even be very helpful for Eastern and Latin Catholics.

4.  The Septuagint (abbreviated LXX) was translated by Jews 200 years before Christ, roughly 600 years before St. Jerome's Latin Vulgate and 1000 years before the Hebrew Masoretic Text -the text which serves as the basis for ALL modern English Old Testament Translations whether Catholic or Protestant.  The Christological prophesies which are lost (or disorted) in the Masoretic are fully evident in the LXX.  This was the primary Old Testament of the great Fathers of the Church.

5.  Numerous notes from ancient Christian Fathers of the Church who's works were among the first to be translated into Armenian by our Holy Translators -following that of the Holy Scriptures (see the list of them below).

6.  Not only is the Septuagint the primary Text used by our Holy Translators Sahag and Mesrob to make the Armenian Version known as the "Queen of All Translations," but it was THE OLD TESTAMENT text used by the Apostles themselves as they were inspired by the Holy Spirit to write the New Testament. WHAT MORE COULD WE ASK FOR IN AN ENGLISH OLD TESTAMENT TRANSLATION???

7.  Based on the above this translation has the potential to become THE OFFICIAL ENGLISH translation of the Orthodox Church of Armenia in the U.S. and other English speaking countries.

Trusting in Christ's Inextinguishable Light
Sdn. Lazarus W. Der-Ghazarian

The OSB can be purchased on-line at:  http://orthodoxstudybible.com/

---------------------------

***Background on the Saint Athanasius Academy Septuagint (SAAS) and the Orthodox Study Bible from the editors:

THE FIRST EVER Orthodox Study Bible presents the Bible of the early Church and the Church of the early Bible.  Believers of the Orthodox Christian faith now have a clear and compelling study resource enabling them to delve into the riches of Holy Scripture.  Prepared by a pan-Orthodox team of scholars and pastors, the Orthodox Study Bile brings to one volume the words of Scripture and the understanding of those words form the earliest days of the Christian era.  More importantly, the Bible is a treasury of Christian commentary for all Christians of the twenty-first century.

The great voices of the historic Church were such luminaries as Ignatius of Antioch, Irenaeus of Lyons, Hippolytus, Athanasius, John Chrysostom, Nicholas of Myra, Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, John Cassian, John of Damascus, and Maximos the Confessor.  Grounded in the Scriptures and inspired by the Holy Spirit, these and numerous others like them were the teachers, preachers, pastors and defenders of the Truth of Christianity in the first millennium of Christian history.  These were the voice of early Christianity, the leaders of the Orthodox Church.

The Orthodox Christian faith is the face of the ancient Church to the modern world and is the second largest body of Christians in the world.  In this first of its kind study Bible, you'll find commentary from the ancient Christian perspective, with sources seldom cited in contemporary study Bibles, sources that shine with heavenly insight.  The OSB was prepared to make this treasury of biblical commentary available to Orthodox believers.  And abundance of additional helps and articles is provided to encourage Christians to become people of informed faith and people of prayer.

But this bible is not just for Orthodox Christians.  Countless otters will find the OSB an invaluable road map for their spiritual journey.  Those exploring Christianity for the first time and those Christians wanting to discover their own spiritual roots will see this Bible as a source of inspiration and challenge.

Features include:  Old Testament from the St. Athanasius Academy Septuagint with Deuterocanon (SAAS); New Testament from the New King James Version (NKJV); Insightful commentary drawn from the Christian writers and teachers of the first ten centuries after Christ; Introduction and outline to each book of the Bible; Helpful notes relating Scripture to seasons of Christian feasting and fasting; And exhaustive subject index to the study notes to facilitate Bible Study; Lectionary to guide your bible reading through the Church year; Morning and Evening prayers;  Supplemental Bible Study articles such as:  Overview of the Books of the Bible; The bible God's Revelation of Man; How to Read the Bible; Saints of the Old Testament; the Sermon on the Mount; Christology; Beautiful full color icons;

The last decade of the twentieth century saw an historic event.  In 1993, the Orthodox Study Bible :  New Testament and Psalms was released, the first English Bible with study material reflecting how the early Christians interpreted and applied the Bible to their lives.  Christians from both the Eastern and Western traditions found a source of Bible study that provided light for their spiritual journeys.   English-speaking Orthodox Christians -whether converts for from Greek, Russian, Arab, Serbian, Bulgarian, Coptic, Armenian or any other Eastern Orthodox parentage -found the biblical roots of their faith in words fresh and powerful. Christians from non-Orthodox traditions glimpsed a faith experience that rang true and enriched their won Christian experience.

The necessity of answering popular demand pressed upon the editors of the New Testament edition the task of preparing an edition of the Orthodox Study Bible with both the Old and New Testaments.  So they undertook the task of preparing a biblical text suitable for the purpose.  The decision was made that the notes and commentary which address the biblical text would emphasize the major themes of the Christian faith.

Thus, the notes give primary attention to:
1.  The Holy Trinity:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
2.  The Incarnation :  the Divine Son of God becoming Man
3.  The Centrality of the Church, the "dwelling place of God in the Spirit" (Eph 2:22)
4.  The Virtues:  God's call to His people to live righteous and holy lives in Christ.

To attain these goals, specific attention was given to the biblical interpretations of the Fathers of the ancient and undivided Church, and to the consensus of the Seven Ecumenical or Church-wide Councils of Christendom, held from the fourth to eighth centuries. Other helps were added to provide the Bible reader every opportunity to employ the Bible not only in study, but also in contemplative Bible reading and prayer.

The prayer of the editors and contributors of The Orthodox Study Bible is that it presents an understandable Bible text and commentary to (1) English-speaking Orthodox Christians the world over and to (2) non-Orthodox readers interested in learning more about the faith of the historic Orthodox Church.

"At last! A study Bible that integrates the Old Testament with the worshipping life of the Church Among the several approaches to the biblical text which Orthodoxy has manifested and permitted over the centuries literal, symbolic or a mix of both  this one follows the more symbolic tradition.  It's the only resource I know of that relates the Old Testament to the theology, liturgy, lectionary and Fathers of Christian antiquity.  Christians of all back grounds  -Orthodox, Catholic and Protestants- will see Christ as the key that unites the whole of Christian tradition through an integrated understand of its parts." -Bradley Nassif, Professor Biblical and Theological Studies, North Park University (Chicago).
« Last Edit: March 05, 2008, 12:54:35 AM by Salpy »
Trusting in Christ's Inextinguishable Light,
Rev. Sub-Deacon Lazarus Der-Ghazarian,
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Offline Salpy

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2008, 06:51:53 PM »
Thanks for posting this Ghazar!

I've been thinking it would be nice to have a discussion on how the new OSB is being received by the OO's, so I'd like to orient the discussion toward that end.

I know that at my church, people are so happy about it.  Imagine, a Bible in English that is like the one translated by Sts. Sahag and Mesrob in the early fifth century!  A lot of people are buying it from our church bookstore.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2008, 12:55:05 AM by Salpy »

Offline Ghazar

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2008, 08:00:45 PM »
Dear Sister in Christ,

That's good to hear about your parish being so receptive.  What parish is that by the way?  It is too early to tell in my parish.  Although I have made it my personal mission to make knowledge of it as widespread as possible.  Lord willing many will use it.  I also contacted Fr. Daniel Findikyan, Dean of St. Nersess Armenian Seminary in NY.  He was very excited to hear of its completion and publication.  Lord willing our new Seminarians will begin using it at St. Nersess and beyond.

Fare well dear sister,
Sdn. Ghazar
« Last Edit: March 05, 2008, 12:55:25 AM by Salpy »
Trusting in Christ's Inextinguishable Light,
Rev. Sub-Deacon Lazarus Der-Ghazarian,
Byzantine Catholic Church, Eparchy of Parma
St. Gregory the Illuminator Institute:
www.looys.net

Offline SolEX01

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2008, 01:38:46 AM »
Sorry for posting 6 months after the last post - I purchased 2 OSB's and enjoy reading the OSB (the passages from the Wisdom of Sirach actually calmed me down during a tough time) - although I gave one OSB as a gift to my estranged wife who's involved with a disfellowshipped (?) JW.   ???

Offline Marc Hanna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #27 on: October 08, 2008, 11:27:59 PM »
I have purchased an OSB and find the text somewhat inadequate, for exmple:

 Matthew 18:26

OSB  “The servant therefore fell down before him . . .”

KJV  “The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him . . .”

TR  “πεσων ουν ο δουλος προσεκυνει αυτω . . .”  Translated:  “Having fallen down therefore the bondman did homage to him . . .”

G4352
προσκυνέω
proskuneō
pros-koo-neh'-o
From G4314 and probably a derivative of G2965 (meaning to kiss, like a dog licking his master’s hand); to fawn or crouch to, that is, (literally or figuratively) prostrate oneself in homage (do reverence to, adore): - worship.

I find it strange that the OSB deletes the word for "worshipped".  This aligns itself with the theological leanings of the NIV.  Even the NA27 includes the word but sites sources that exclude it in the critical apparatus.  I am working a comprehensive comparison, but so far I am not impressed with the OSB.  I find the text in many cases to be rather protestant.

Offline SolEX01

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2008, 12:29:02 AM »
This aligns itself with the theological leanings of the NIV.  Even the NA27 includes the word but sites sources that exclude it in the critical apparatus.  I am working a comprehensive comparison, but so far I am not impressed with the OSB.  I find the text in many cases to be rather protestant.

If  "do homage" is a valid and appropriate translation from the Greek, what is the problem?

The OSB uses the NKJV to facillitate ease of reading by non-ethnic people interested in Orthodoxy.

Offline Marc Hanna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2008, 01:11:29 AM »
The OSB does not include "did homage" either.  It excludes any translation from the Greek text regarding this word.  It treats the word as though it does not exist in the Greek text.

Offline SolEX01

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #30 on: October 09, 2008, 01:21:01 AM »
Going back to the Greek translation of προσκυνέω as prostrated....

prostrated = fell down

I still don't see a problem when an accurate Greek translation is being used.

What is the source for the Greek translations so I can take a look myself?   8)

Offline Αριστοκλής

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2008, 02:35:26 AM »
Going back to the Greek translation of προσκυνέω as prostrated....

prostrated = fell down

I still don't see a problem when an accurate Greek translation is being used.

What is the source for the Greek translations so I can take a look myself?   8)

Looks to be straight from Strong's, or at least based on its definitions. Nothing beats asking a real Greek, however.  ;)
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Offline SolEX01

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #32 on: October 09, 2008, 02:42:14 AM »
Looks to be straight from Strong's, or at least based on its definitions. Nothing beats asking a real Greek, however.  ;)

"bow" is another valid translation - from Divry's.   ;)

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2008, 07:47:26 AM »
This aligns itself with the theological leanings of the NIV.  Even the NA27 includes the word but sites sources that exclude it in the critical apparatus.  I am working a comprehensive comparison, but so far I am not impressed with the OSB.  I find the text in many cases to be rather protestant.

If  "do homage" is a valid and appropriate translation from the Greek, what is the problem?

The OSB uses the NKJV to facillitate ease of reading by non-ethnic people interested in Orthodoxy.

Another issue (and I got this from someone involved with it) was the influence of KJV on English. They, for instance preferred "The Sons of Israel," which is more correct for the Greek "uioi tou Israel," but "Children of Israel" is entrenched.  I think this is what, for instance, is in opporation of why Psalm 22/23 is "The Lord is my Shephard," rather than "The Lord shephard's me."
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline Marc Hanna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #34 on: October 09, 2008, 08:31:57 AM »
The word "πεσων" is translated as "fallen down", so obviously the word "προσεκυνει" was being used to further the idea and should be contrasted in the translation or else it would be translated "having fallen down therefore the servant fell down to him," which doesn't make any sense.

My issue is that the OSB simply left the translation of "προσεκυνει" out not that it was translated wrong.  However, in consulting four different lexicons, they all reference it particularly to worshipping.

I used Strong's in my original post but only because I have it on my computer and it's easy to "cut and paste" not because I believe it to be the final authority.

The OSB appears to inherit most of the flaws of the NKJV.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2008, 09:26:39 AM by Marc Hanna »

Offline Marc Hanna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #35 on: October 09, 2008, 09:50:08 AM »
Let's compare a similar passage:

Mat 2:11
OSB: . . . and fell down and worshipped Him.

TR: . . .και πεσοντες προσεκυνησαν αυτω . . .

In this case the OSB translates both words; "fell down" and "worshipped"

Why then in Mat 18:26 does it only translate one of the words?
Mat 18:26
OSB:  The servant therefore fell down before him . .
TR: . . .πεσων ουν ο δουλος προσεκυνει αυτω
KJV:  The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him
« Last Edit: October 09, 2008, 09:57:37 AM by Marc Hanna »

Offline Αριστοκλής

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #36 on: October 09, 2008, 10:09:48 AM »
Let's compare a similar passage:

Mat 2:11
OSB: . . . and fell down and worshipped Him.

TR: . . .και πεσοντες προσεκυνησαν αυτω . . .

In this case the OSB translates both words; "fell down" and "worshipped"

Why then in Mat 18:26 does it only translate one of the words?
Mat 18:26
OSB:  The servant therefore fell down before him . .
TR: . . .πεσων ουν ο δουλος προσεκυνει αυτω
KJV:  The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him

I do believe it has been pointed out in this thread that the OSB utilized the NKJV as its base translation making new translations where the NKJV did not have any particular book.Specifically, the NT in the OSB is the NKJV verbatim (with Orthodox commentary). Hence, your issue should be with the NKJV and not the OSB, don't you think?
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Offline Marc Hanna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #37 on: October 09, 2008, 10:19:31 AM »
Yes, agreed.  The OSB was however supposed to correct these issues and aligne the text to the Orthodox faith, which in some cases it did but in others it didn't.

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2008, 10:29:01 AM »
Yes, agreed.  The OSB was however supposed to correct these issues and aligne the text to the Orthodox faith, which in some cases it did but in others it didn't.
I'm not sure I can buy your take on the intent of the publication, not that I would have an issue with those goals. Again, I recall no "aligning of text...etc.", as you state, as any goal. If you have such a need, volunteer to help on the EOB project.
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Offline Marc Hanna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2008, 10:47:28 AM »
Maybe so.  But my original point was that the text of the OSB is somewhat inadequate and I think my example at least raises concern that the OSB contains similar textual corruptions to that of many modern Protestant translations such as the NIV.  I still prefer the KJV.  I also like the Douay Rheims ** ducks head and dodges tomatos being thrown **.

The EOB seems quite intriguing but I'm sure they're seeking much more qualified people than me.

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #40 on: October 09, 2008, 08:26:06 PM »
Maybe so.  But my original point was that the text of the OSB is somewhat inadequate and I think my example at least raises concern that the OSB contains similar textual corruptions to that of many modern Protestant translations such as the NIV.  I still prefer the KJV.  I also like the Douay Rheims ** ducks head and dodges tomatos being thrown **.

My priest recommended it, as the Douay Rheims, like all Vulgate based Bibles, followed the Vetus Latina, not the Vulgate, Psalter.  The Vetus translated from the Septuagint, hence the DR was the closest think to a Septuagint translation in English.
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline Alveus Lacuna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #41 on: December 15, 2008, 02:25:19 AM »
First of all, let me say that I have searched long and hard for a thread about this translation of the Holy Scriptures, so please forgive me if there is already a thread about this; I could not find it if there is such a thread.

I am seriously considering ordering this Bible, but I have read many mixed reviews about it.  I am considering spurging on the genuine red-leather edition (for $100!), but many people seem very critical about the way this came out.  Some say it's too "Protestant", others say that it is unfaithful to Orthodoxy, et cetera.  But as a catechumen who only really reads either the NRSV or the NIV for study, do you think that this would be better, or should I just stick with the Bible translations that I use and avoid this version?

Keep in mind that I really have no idea about Orthodox perspectives of the Scriptures, so this might be helpful to me.  Is the font large enough for the average reader?  Is the commentary helpful?

Any thoughts are appreciated!

« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 02:43:09 AM by Alveus Lacuna »

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #42 on: December 15, 2008, 02:41:30 AM »
It's been a couple years since I read the critiques of the NT part of the OSB, but my general recollection was that there were some valid points amongst a number of picky points. I don't use the OSB that much myself, especially now that I have a new Thompson's Chain-Reference Bible, but my wife has the new OSB, and my impressions of it are generally good. I would think that it's especially good for someone just getting aquainted with Orthodoxy, as it has short articles on things like deification, confession, etc. It also has the generally well-regarded article by Met. Kallistos on How To Read the Bible, a glossary of Orthodox terms, maps, and other stuff. One criticism of the OSB is that the notes are simplistic or simply restate what a verse says, but fwiw my wife finds the notes to be helpful. The font is fairly large compared to other Bible translations that I have.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 02:44:44 AM by Asteriktos »

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #43 on: December 15, 2008, 08:22:18 AM »
This aligns itself with the theological leanings of the NIV.  Even the NA27 includes the word but sites sources that exclude it in the critical apparatus.  I am working a comprehensive comparison, but so far I am not impressed with the OSB.  I find the text in many cases to be rather protestant.

If  "do homage" is a valid and appropriate translation from the Greek, what is the problem?

The OSB uses the NKJV to facillitate ease of reading by non-ethnic people interested in Orthodoxy.

There are also copyright issues, and leveling the translation.  It was thought, for instance, that "Uiou tou Israil" should be "Sons of Israel" but "Children of Israel" was opted for, in deference to established usage.
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #44 on: December 15, 2008, 01:05:17 PM »
The EOB's articles etc. is available online:
http://www.orthodox-church.info/eob/download.asp
As is the scholarly (i.e. concerned only with the received text, not the faith it expresses), the New English Translation of the Septuagint.
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/nets/
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 01:06:51 PM by ialmisry »
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline ignatius

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #45 on: December 15, 2008, 01:39:08 PM »
Hi All,

Personally, I really appreciate the OSB... it's the only Bible I've owned where the Old Testament meant more than a historical footnote for the New. Maybe that is because of my own ignorance of the Scriptures but I still have to say that the OSB notes have been wonderful for me. I love the Old Testament translation because it seems more 'Christ-focused' when I read it. It just seems like I can see Christ in the pages better.

Anyways I'm thankful for the labor done for this offering to the English-Speaking Orthodox Church.

God Bless.
St Basil the Great (330-379 A.D.): “I think then that the one goal of all who are really and truly serving the Lord ought to be to bring back to union the churches who have at different times and in diverse manners divided from one another.”

Offline Alveus Lacuna

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #46 on: December 15, 2008, 03:01:24 PM »
Whoever merged this with another thread, thank you for doing that.  After reading through these reviews and some others, the critiques seem to come from those who are possess a highly technical knowledge of the Scriptures, which I lack. 

I think that the simple commentary is just what I need in these simple times of faith and learning as a catechumen.  Most of my pursuit of Christ up to this point in my life has been intellectual, so I think that think that a study Bible that is less cerebral is just what the doctor ordered.  I'll go ahead and hop over and order this Bible.  May I use it faithfully!

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #47 on: December 15, 2008, 04:41:47 PM »
Maybe so.  But my original point was that the text of the OSB is somewhat inadequate and I think my example at least raises concern that the OSB contains similar textual corruptions to that of many modern Protestant translations such as the NIV.  I still prefer the KJV.  I also like the Douay Rheims ** ducks head and dodges tomatos being thrown **.

The EOB seems quite intriguing but I'm sure they're seeking much more qualified people than me.

The EOB and the OSB seem to take a similar approach to Matthew 18:26:

EOB: 26 At this, the servant fell down on his knees before him, saying: ‘Lord, have
patience with me, and I will repay you all!’

See this, especially the table on page 22.


« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 04:48:47 PM by Jetavan »
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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #48 on: December 15, 2008, 06:13:46 PM »
Let's compare a similar passage:

Mat 2:11
OSB: . . . and fell down and worshipped Him.

TR: . . .και πεσοντες προσεκυνησαν αυτω . . .

In this case the OSB translates both words; "fell down" and "worshipped"

Why then in Mat 18:26 does it only translate one of the words?
Mat 18:26
OSB:  The servant therefore fell down before him . .
TR: . . .πεσων ουν ο δουλος προσεκυνει αυτω
KJV:  The servant therefore fell down, and worshipped him

I missed this the first time around, but I can explain why there is a difference. The problem is that the word "worship" in English means something both more abstract and more specific than the Greek word. If you look at the context of the two passages, in the first it is clear that the English meaning is what is meant. In the second case the servant's intent towards his master is surely not meant to be the same as that of the magi towards Jesus; it means specifically his posture of submission. That's why the NASB says "So the slave fell to the ground and prostrated himself before him".

Offline stewie

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2008, 11:48:26 AM »
As someone who reads this book (almost) every day, and read the last one (NT only) as well, I have to say that the NT notes are MUCH improved.  OT notes are spotty, but that is to be expected for such a huge project.  Overall there is not much to complain about.  They did a great job with it, IMO.

I find some notes useless, and some very illuminating.  Nothing is going to satisfy everyone, as we are all at different stages in our understanding.

For someone who is building an understanding of Orthodoxy, this is a must-have.

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #50 on: February 07, 2009, 05:51:34 PM »
Being new to Orthodoxy, the OSB has been very helpful. I enjoy the quotes from the Church Fathers, and I especially like the Marion typology. I spent 20years steeped in Protestantism (Calvinism, etc), and I never recognized all the profound mystical typology in the Bible! How do Protestants miss this?

I do wish there were more in depth doctrinal notes and articles. For example, I am anxious to know the Orthodox doctrines regarding election and predestination. Also, I wish there were notes clarifying the Orthodox teaching about the giants spoken of in Genesis 6, and other things like this.

But over all, I think it is a beautiful and helpful Bible. Perhaps somebody somewhere is working on an Oriental Orthodox Study Bible? I would love that!!!

Selam
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Offline ChristusDominus

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #51 on: May 12, 2009, 08:38:24 PM »
It's me again, resurrecting ancient threads  ;D, but I have to ask, does the New Testament in this particular bible come from the KJV?
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Offline cholmes

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #52 on: May 12, 2009, 11:19:23 PM »
It's me again, resurrecting ancient threads  ;D, but I have to ask, does the New Testament in this particular bible come from the KJV?

I believe it's the NKJV.

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #53 on: May 13, 2009, 12:12:01 AM »
It's me again, resurrecting ancient threads  ;D, but I have to ask, does the New Testament in this particular bible come from the KJV?

I believe it's the NKJV.

Yes, and supposedly it was because of copyright issues of the publisher.
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Offline ChristusDominus

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #54 on: May 13, 2009, 12:24:35 AM »
I believe it's the NKJV.
That's what I thought and it baffles me. Why would the EO use a Protestant translation?
« Last Edit: May 13, 2009, 12:25:43 AM by ChristusDominus »
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Offline Michał

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #55 on: May 13, 2009, 12:44:49 AM »
I believe it's the NKJV.
That's what I thought and it baffles me. Why would the EO use a Protestant translation?

Because one EO guy (a deacon, I belive) is someone important in Thomas Nelson, Inc.

Offline Michał

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #56 on: May 13, 2009, 01:02:58 AM »
But over all, I think it is a beautiful and helpful Bible. Perhaps somebody somewhere is working on an Oriental Orthodox Study Bible? I would love that!!!

Gebre Menfes Kidus, here you can find an Amharic/English version of the Ethiopian Bible (New Testament, Psalms and Proverbs so far). Maybe it's not an Oriental Orthodox Study Bible, but still interesting.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2009, 01:09:35 AM by Michał »

Offline Αριστοκλής

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #57 on: May 13, 2009, 08:31:38 AM »
I believe it's the NKJV.
That's what I thought and it baffles me. Why would the EO use a Protestant translation?

Well, for starters it was the quickest way to get a Bible out. Second, the owner of Thomas Nelson is an Orthodox Christian and allowed his patent to be used w/o royalties.
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Offline jnorm888

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #58 on: May 15, 2009, 10:31:29 PM »
I believe it's the NKJV.
That's what I thought and it baffles me. Why would the EO use a Protestant translation?

It would be nice to see an EO-NKJV New Testament.

Something like the RC-RSV........but EO.





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Offline HandmaidenofGod

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #59 on: May 15, 2009, 11:27:51 PM »
I was REALLY dissapointed with the Old Testament notes. I was so excited to finally get my hands on a Bible with the full Orthodox canon (I had only read Protestant Bibles in the past), ripped open the box from Amazon, flipped opened the book and was like "WHAT?! This is IT?!"

Most Orthodox Christians are pretty ignorant when it comes to Old Testament text to begin with, so I was saddened to see that this just reinforced the idea that the Old Testament isn't worth paying that much attention to.

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Offline Douglas

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #60 on: May 15, 2009, 11:36:30 PM »
We're very pleased with the OSB. My wife and I greatly appreciated the years of work that went into this massive project. I recognize that there are some issues (and there will always be nay-sayers) but all in all... it's a great tool for study and for evangelism.
Douglas no longer posts on the forum.

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #61 on: May 16, 2009, 12:08:13 AM »
I was REALLY dissapointed with the Old Testament notes. I was so excited to finally get my hands on a Bible with the full Orthodox canon (I had only read Protestant Bibles in the past), ripped open the box from Amazon, flipped opened the book and was like "WHAT?! This is IT?!"

Most Orthodox Christians are pretty ignorant when it comes to Old Testament text to begin with, so I was saddened to see that this just reinforced the idea that the Old Testament isn't worth paying that much attention to.



While the OT notes are not in depth, I do find that it does an excellent job pointing out the typology and prophetic analogies of Our Lady and Our Lord. As a former Protestant, I had never seen all these profound truths that are replete throughout the OT. So, I think it is a worthy Bible for that fact alone.

Selam
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Offline Keble

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #62 on: May 16, 2009, 01:44:09 PM »
One hates to have to point these things out:

  • The KJV is also a Protestant translation. In fact, the only totally non-Prot translations from the ancient languages are the NAB and the (N)JB.
  • The final editions of the RSV do have the whole Orthodox canon, as does (I believe) the equivalent edition of the NRSV.

Offline ChristusDominus

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #63 on: May 16, 2009, 02:46:12 PM »
One hates to have to point these things out:

  • The KJV is also a Protestant translation. In fact, the only totally non-Prot translations from the ancient languages are the NAB and the (N)JB.
  • The final editions of the RSV do have the whole Orthodox canon, as does (I believe) the equivalent edition of the NRSV.

The NAB is a Catholic translation, right? By the way, who is the fellow in your avatar? might it be Cramer. Please forgive my ignorance
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Offline Keble

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #64 on: May 17, 2009, 09:13:23 AM »
The NAB is a Catholic translation, right?

Yes. It's terrible.

Quote
By the way, who is the fellow in your avatar? might it be Cramer.

It is indeed Cramner.

Offline ChristusDominus

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2009, 12:19:44 PM »
The NAB is a Catholic translation, right?

Yes. It's terrible.

Quote
By the way, who is the fellow in your avatar? might it be Cramer.

It is indeed Cramner.

Oh o.k., That's what I thought and sorry I got the spelling wrong. :police: And can you tell me why the NAB is a terrible translation?
« Last Edit: May 17, 2009, 12:21:12 PM by ChristusDominus »
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Offline Keble

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2009, 10:59:43 PM »
Mostly it's because the English is abominable, but it also has some decided adventurism. For instance, in several places it re-orders the text; an example is found in Isaiah 41, which has verses 6 & 7 of Isaiah 40 inserted after verse 20. Neuhaus said of it, "It succeeds in being, at the same time, loose, stilted, breezy, vulgar, opaque, and relentlessly averse to literary grace."

Offline jwinch2

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #67 on: May 23, 2011, 03:48:36 PM »
I apologize for performing such an appalling case of thread necromancy here but I am hoping to get a bit of additional insight on this Bible.  As a bit of background, I am Catholic in the Latin Rite and am in the process of engaging in some serious Bible study.  I have a couple of Bible commentaries (Ingatius Catholic Study Bible and the New Jerome Commentary) and am getting ready to pick up the Navarre Study Bible series as well as the Ignatius Old Testament when that comes out.  

What I would like to do is pick up a good study Bible from the Eastern perspective.  I recognize that the OSB is not going to be supportive of all of the traditions from the Latin Rite but and I can handle that.  I am hoping that you will be able to provide a recommendation as to whether this would be a good product for me to have or, if not, is there something better?  I am hoping that having the perspective of Orthodox Christianity will help to enhance my understanding of Sacred Scripture in the light of Church teaching.  Some of the reviews I have read on Amazon and the like have led me to believe that the study notes may not be truly representative of Eastern teaching when it comes to the Bible.  However, many of those commenting were admittedly non-Orthodox or even Eastern Catholics so I am trying to take their comments with a grain of salt.  Having said that, there will obviously be real Orthodox Christians on this forum so I thought I could get a good review here.  

So with that in mind.  Is it a good Bible?  Are the notes correct in representing Eastern Tradition and Orthodox teaching?  Are they detailed when it comes to spiritual understanding or are they focused more on the literal sense?  

Also, based on the earlier comments on the NAB and I guess now with the NABRE my friends and I joke from time to time that we hope they come out with a Catholic Edition at some point...  ;)

Thank you very much in advance and may God bless all of you!

Jason
« Last Edit: May 23, 2011, 04:00:34 PM by jwinch2 »

Offline Kerdy

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #68 on: August 31, 2013, 11:43:16 PM »
Does anyone or has anyone ever really used the OSB?  I will be honest, I got one and was super excited about having it, but it seems to be about on the same level as many of my other bibles.  I guess my biggest fear is the pages are so super thin.  The last bible I had with paper this thin I tore several pages by accident just flipping through.  I just ordered a RSV-CE and will compare the two.  Maybe I am missing something in the OSB to see how good it is.

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #69 on: September 01, 2013, 12:10:34 AM »
It's definitely lacking in notes and commentary on an Orthodox examination of issues like predestination and election, but it still has lots of other wonderful Orthodox commentary. I'm not a fan of the translation, but I still use my OSB as my primary Bible.


Selam
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Offline Kerdy

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #70 on: September 01, 2013, 12:20:33 AM »
It's definitely lacking in notes and commentary on an Orthodox examination of issues like predestination and election, but it still has lots of other wonderful Orthodox commentary. I'm not a fan of the translation, but I still use my OSB as my primary Bible.


Selam

Have you ever used an RSV-CE?  I was going to get the RSV-2CE from Ignatius, but I like the thees and thous and words of Jesus in red so I with St. Benedicts press.

Don't get me wrong, I like the OSB.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2013, 12:22:12 AM by Kerdy »

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #71 on: September 01, 2013, 12:37:08 AM »
What is the appeal of the words in red exactly? I understand the criticism of that approach, but have never really thought about possible advantages.

Offline Kerdy

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Re: Orthodox Study Bible: OO and EO Perspectives
« Reply #72 on: September 01, 2013, 12:47:44 AM »
What is the appeal of the words in red exactly? I understand the criticism of that approach, but have never really thought about possible advantages.

It is just a tool.  I do not really know why I like it other than it is what I am used to seeing.  It makes it easier to find certain things when I am looking for them.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2013, 12:50:01 AM by Kerdy »