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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 6617 times) Average Rating: 0
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« Reply #45 on: March 11, 2008, 09:43:51 PM »

"The Lord of the Rings" trilogy

Toshiro Mifune "Samurai" movies like "Yojimbo", "Sanjuro" and "The Seven Samurai"

Studio Ghibli movies such as "Spirited Away", "My Neighbor Totoro", "The Cat Returns", "Whispers of the Heart" "Princess Mononoke", "My Neighbors the Yamadas", "Nausicaa", "Porco Rosso", "PomPoko" and more.  All with terrific animation art and good stories.

"Amelie"

Indiana Jones Movies 1 and 3

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Shadowlands

Pixar works - "The Incredibles", "Cars", "Monsters, Inc", "Toy Story 1 and 2"

Casablanca and The Maltese Falcon

Just for starters

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I loved Monty Pyton and the Holy Grail!
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« Reply #46 on: March 12, 2008, 11:18:45 PM »

To my job. Wink

Seriously, if I felt it would do them harm, I wouldn't show it at all. Personally, I'd rather a film have gratuitous nudity than gratuitous violence, but parents can be weird about stuff like that. So, in class, R rating means no one under 17 sees it. I like to play it safe.

Y, I'm in the same situation.  A couple of years ago, I showed a film that had some "bad" portions in it.  I thought I had edited them all out.  I hit the skip button a second too late and there was a flash!  I didn't get into any trouble since my principal understood that a little mistake like that could easily happen to anyone else.  I was fortunate; now I'm very, very, very careful!
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« Reply #47 on: March 13, 2008, 12:14:05 AM »

I seem to recall a Christian video company a few years back that would sell family friendly i.e. cleaned up versions of popular movies.  Deleted nude scenes, bad language, anything that would get you above a PG rating.  Sounds fine for the under 13 crowd, but probably pretty boring for adults. 

Which leads me to wonder about something.  As Orthodox Christians we may love movies like No Country for Old Men or Knocked Up, but the language, the violence and the sexual themes are not edifying.  Shouldn't our entertainment be edifying or can we say that we are adults who are able to edit out the images and language without harming our spiritual lives.  I know what the saints would say, but I'd have to ask myself if I would be willing to give up what seems like relatively harmless entertainment for a saintly life.  Monastics wouldn't watch many of these movies, so aren't we called to do the same thing?  I'm not suggesting I'm ready to do that, hypocrite that I am, but it makes me question the balance between living a modern life, indulging what seem like simple pastimes, and living out the Gospel.  I can see why some people think it's an all or nothing commandment and live rigorously strict lives as lay persons.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2008, 12:14:38 AM by TinaG » Logged

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« Reply #48 on: March 13, 2008, 12:20:58 PM »

I seem to recall a Christian video company a few years back that would sell family friendly i.e. cleaned up versions of popular movies.  Deleted nude scenes, bad language, anything that would get you above a PG rating.  Sounds fine for the under 13 crowd, but probably pretty boring for adults. 

Which leads me to wonder about something.  As Orthodox Christians we may love movies like No Country for Old Men or Knocked Up, but the language, the violence and the sexual themes are not edifying.  Shouldn't our entertainment be edifying or can we say that we are adults who are able to edit out the images and language without harming our spiritual lives.  I know what the saints would say, but I'd have to ask myself if I would be willing to give up what seems like relatively harmless entertainment for a saintly life.  Monastics wouldn't watch many of these movies, so aren't we called to do the same thing?  I'm not suggesting I'm ready to do that, hypocrite that I am, but it makes me question the balance between living a modern life, indulging what seem like simple pastimes, and living out the Gospel.  I can see why some people think it's an all or nothing commandment and live rigorously strict lives as lay persons.

There actually are some fairly decent alternatives that aren't just plain goofy (like edited normal movies or really sappy commercial Christian productions.  Most libraries have a lot of opera and theater on DVD; thankfully my university library also has a lot of foreign of independent films that are more into good writing and artistry than trying to sell with sex and violence.   Of course there are plenty of sexual themes in them, but not in such graphic detail.  Many I'm getting more and more the fundamentalist... but I think there really is some spiritual damage involved with constantly watching un-edifying movies, listening to horrible music and the like - in moderation though and mixed with better stuff has worked the best for me personally. 
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« Reply #49 on: March 14, 2008, 09:13:42 AM »

The way I see it, offensive language, violence, and sexuality are part of the world we live in. The monastics, who are removed from the world, could more easily give up entertainment, but we who are in the world cannot. Offensive language will always be around us; even if we never see above a G-rated movie again, we'll hear it from co-workers. Now, I'm no hedonist; I'm not saying that we must indulge in the world's pleasures and entertainment. In fact, the spirit of Lent is quite the opposite. But we must realize that we are in the world.

What did St. James tell us? "Pure and undefiled religion before God and the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their trouble, and to keep oneself unspotted from the world" (James 1:27). He did not command us to shun the world or to condemn it, but to keep ourselves unspotted by it. Some people are able to drink responsibly; others are given to drunkenness. Some people can use their sexual desires responsibly; others are given to debauchery. In the same way, some people are able to hear offensive language and appreciate its artistic value (where such value exists), yet not engage in it; others have a propensity to repeating such language out of its context and thus offend others by it.

When in the world, we must engage the world, interact with the world, set an example for the world. If we hide ourselves from the world, if we do not understand the culture around us, if we do not relate to the people around us, what good is it to be in the world? We should all be monastics, then. But we who are in the world are the "city on a hill which cannot be hidden." What did our Lord say about us? "Nor do they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lampstand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven" (Matthew 5:15-16).

A light is no good if it is burned out, and we must be careful that we do not look just like the world or adopt its practices. Yet a light which is hidden might as well be burned out. So go see a movie, talk about it with your friends and co-workers. They'll be more likely to see your good works and glorify God.
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« Reply #50 on: March 14, 2008, 11:10:56 AM »

Some really good points Mr. Y.  Being in the world but setting an example for it by our behaviour.  Which as an artist is a hard balancing act. 

For example, I write poetry and occasionally get some of the less awful stuff published.  I often like to write angry, raw or very frank poems and have used a few four letter words.  The sinful side of me that frequently punctuates my own speech with four letter words finds this a useful literary expression.  Am I being a realistic portrayer of how people communicate sometimes or just a poser who thinks an F-bomb will make my poem cooler? 

It's the same with movies, to get back to the general subject.  I am totally and unequivocally opposed to people using the Lord's name as a curse word in movies, but what about the artistic use of other common curse words?  Is it acceptable, unacceptable, or a violation of our Lord's call to us to seek perfection and to be in the world, but not part of it?  These questions really prove either how hard it is to live a Christian life in the world, or how easy it could be if you followed the commandments almost as a lay monastic.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2008, 11:12:33 AM by TinaG » Logged

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« Reply #51 on: March 14, 2008, 11:24:00 AM »


What did St. James tell us? "Pure and undefiled religion before God and the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their trouble, and to keep oneself unspotted from the world" (James 1:27). He did not command us to shun the world or to condemn it, but to keep ourselves unspotted by it. Some people are able to drink responsibly; others are given to drunkenness. Some people can use their sexual desires responsibly; others are given to debauchery. In the same way, some people are able to hear offensive language and appreciate its artistic value (where such value exists), yet not engage in it; others have a propensity to repeating such language out of its context and thus offend others by it.


Hear, hear! And I believe that those who refuse to see, for example, "Pulp Fiction" because it contains offensive language are simply depriving themselves of a great masterpiece of postmodernist cinematography, which is unforgivable...
« Last Edit: March 14, 2008, 11:25:15 AM by Heorhij » Logged

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« Reply #52 on: March 14, 2008, 10:11:20 PM »

I'd like to add another to my list;

Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

Bill Murray, Owen Wilson, Willem Defoe, Cate Blanchett, Jeff Goldblum...and the soundtrack is awesom- lots of David Bowie.
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« Reply #53 on: April 17, 2008, 12:58:53 PM »

I seem to recall a Christian video company a few years back that would sell family friendly i.e. cleaned up versions of popular movies.  Deleted nude scenes, bad language, anything that would get you above a PG rating.  Sounds fine for the under 13 crowd, but probably pretty boring for adults. 

This reminds me of something I pointed out to our kids a while ago.  The "Lord of the Rings" movies have no nudity, no bad language, no 'naughty bits'.  Well, there is the pipe smoking and drinking beer but imho that's not very naughty. And they weren't boring at all.  Smiley

They are rated PG-13 for intense situations, which are part of the story.  The only reason we didn't let the older children see them first in a theater was that they were too young when they first came put to see a 'two-story' orc as it were.  It would have been too intense in our view.  We did show them parts of the movies at home in lighted comfortable surroundings and as they got older they got to see more.  We'd also read the books to them and they were reading them on their own.

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« Reply #54 on: April 17, 2008, 03:24:32 PM »

Oh, come on!  Kids see worst gratuitous nudity on primetime on any given day!  What harm could it possibly do?   Grin
Excalibur is far more explicit than anything I have seen on Television.
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« Reply #55 on: April 17, 2008, 03:32:22 PM »

I watched the movie "Ils" on my bus ride home from school today (nice way to eat up 77 of my 90 minute commute) and it was pretty good, especially by modern horror movie standards.  Focus on suspense and atmosphere, rather than cheap scares and gore.  If you don't mind subtitles, it was a good short film.
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« Reply #56 on: April 17, 2008, 08:32:18 PM »

Watched 1408 the other night. I've never read any of Stephen King's novels and know nothing about him, but if the films of a lot of his books are true to their content he seems to have some interesting spiritual tendancies.  Does anyone know his religious background?

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« Reply #57 on: April 17, 2008, 08:41:04 PM »

^IIRC, he grew up in the Methodist church and doesn't adhere to any particular church nowadays.  The Stand definitely has a lot of Christian influence in it.  Here's a bit from an interview he did a few years ago:

I was struck by a great deal of religious connotation and biblical imagery in Dark Tower. I've seen it in a lot of your other stuff, but it's certainly very obvious here. Where are you going with that? What do you want to say that you're not saying?


SK: I don't know. I think that I am saying most of what I want to say. Above all else, I'm interested in good and evil. And I'm interested in the question about whether or not there are powers of good and powers of evil that exist outside ourselves. I think that the concept of evil is something that's in the human heart. The goodness in the human heart is probably more interesting, psychologically, but in terms of myth, the idea that there are forces of evil and forces of good outside, and because I was raised in a fairly strict religious home, not hard-shelled Baptist or anything like that, I tend to coalesce those concepts around God symbols and devil symbols, and I put them in my work.


JB: What kind of background did you come from if it wasn't "hard-shelled Baptist?"


SK: Hard-nosed Methodist.


JB: So you weren't into really evangelical, fundi kinds of things.


SK: No.


JB: But you clearly learned your Bible.


SK: Yeah, I clearly learned my Bible, and I took a lot of what it says to heart enough to be disgusted by the Jim and Tammy Baker's and the Rex Humbug's of the world, where it says 'when you pray go inside your closet and shut the door and do it by yourself, don't do it in front of everybody so that everybody will know how religious you are.' I'm really sort of impressed by something that C. S. Lewis said about The Rings trilogy, Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy, where he said, "as good as Tolkien was at depicting good, he was much more effective at depicting evil." I think that that's true, and I think that it's easier for all of us to grasp evil, because it's a simpler concept, and good is so many-faceted and it's so layered. I've always tried to contrast that bright, white light of real goodness or Godliness against evil. I'm not a proselytizer, and I hate organized religion. I think it's one of the roots of real evil that's in our world. If you really unmask Satan, you'll probably find that he's wearing a turnaround collar.


JB: What do you mean by organized religion? How do you define that?


SK: Well, when they start telling you when you're supposed to be on your knees and when you're supposed to be standing up and when you look at the front of the building and you see there's a list of the hymns you're going to sing, that's organized religion. And when they start to band you together and say, "these are the magazines you're not supposed to buy in the 7-Eleven," that's organized religion. And sooner or later, it always overspills into political issues. Jesus said, "Render those things under to Caesar that are Caesar's and render unto God the things that are God's," and - I don't know, that scripture keeps getting overlooked by these guys who want to do Moral Majority and all the rest of it. You can't operate in those terms. You've got the man in black in this book that looks like a priest, who does messianic things. He raises the dead. But to no good purpose. At least when Jesus rose from the dead he had the good grace to hang around for a while and then get the hell out. He didn't do a TV show or hang around like the weed-eater, Norton, in the book. He got offstage. It's an interesting thing. I heard somebody say once at some kind of New Testament conference that I was at a few years ago, that when Jesus rose Lazarus from the dead, he took everybody to the graveyard and said, "Lazarus, come forth!" If he'd just said "Come forth!" everybody in the graveyard would have gotten up and walked. Can you imagine that? How's that for a horror story?


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« Reply #58 on: April 17, 2008, 08:55:58 PM »

Thanks EofK - that's very interesting!
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« Reply #59 on: April 18, 2008, 09:25:01 AM »

And sooner or later, it always overspills into political issues. Jesus said, "Render those things under to Caesar that are Caesar's and render unto God the things that are God's," and - I don't know, that scripture keeps getting overlooked by these guys who want to do Moral Majority and all the rest of it. You can't operate in those terms.
I do believe that's the best interpretation of that verse I've heard yet. For once someone gets it, and doesn't limit it to money.
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