Prayers for Non-Christian Dead

(1/3) > >>

Myrrh23:
Hey!


My father is a liberal Muslim, yet has much respect for Jesus and Christianity. I love my father because he's been there for his family so many times, and has never been abusive. My Catholic mother is the opposite of my father. I've been encouraging him to take a deeper look at Christianity in the hopes that he might jump aboard. However, if he doesn't and dies without converting, could I help send him to Heaven with the Orthodox Prayers for the Dead, or am I misinterpreting stuff? I would hate for my mother to have a foot in the door just because she's a Christian. Thanks!


Myrrh23

ozgeorge:
God preserve your father and grant him many years!
Rather than plan for what do do in case of his death, pray for him now. Place him at the feet of Christ in your prayers and say: "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on my father whom I love, and save him through the prayers of the Theotokos."
There is no one for whom we cannot pray. There is nowhere where God is not. There is no one and nothing out of reach for God. Not even in hell. At the third "Kneeling Prayer" of Pentecost, the Eastern Orthodox Church prays that the Holy Spirit will visit hell and comfort even the souls there.
And as for "having a foot in the door" because we are Christian, remember Christ's words:
“Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven." (Matthew 7:21)

PeterTheAleut:
First, I want to back what ozgeorge just said.  Why not pray for your father now?

That said, the only prohibition we Orthodox have against praying for the non-Christian dead--this also covers prayers for those Christians who die outside the embrace of the Orthodox Church--is that we are not permitted to lift up liturgical, communal prayers such as the funeral, the Panikhida, and the Augmented Litanies for the non-Orthodox.  Our liturgical prayers for the departed are reserved for those who die as communicants and catechumens of the Orthodox Church.  In your private prayers, however, you are permitted--yea, even encouraged--to pray for ALL the dead among your family, friends, acquaintances, etc., whether they are Orthodox, Christian of a heterodox communion, or not even Christian.

GiC:
Quote from: PeterTheAleut on January 27, 2008, 08:12:57 PM

That said, the only prohibition we Orthodox have against praying for the non-Christian dead--this also covers prayers for those Christians who die outside the embrace of the Orthodox Church--is that we are not permitted to lift up liturgical, communal prayers such as the funeral, the Panikhida, and the Augmented Litanies for the non-Orthodox.  Our liturgical prayers for the departed are reserved for those who die as communicants and catechumens of the Orthodox Church.  In your private prayers, however, you are permitted--yea, even encouraged--to pray for ALL the dead among your family, friends, acquaintances, etc., whether they are Orthodox, Christian of a heterodox communion, or not even Christian.


It should also be noted that though this is custom, it is not universal practice; while funerals are reserved for those in communion with the Church I know several priests who will give prayers for those who have died and were not members of the Church.

ozgeorge:
Quote from: greekischristian on January 27, 2008, 09:22:11 PM

It should also be noted that though this is custom, it is not universal practice; while funerals are reserved for those in communion with the Church I know several priests who will give prayers for those who have died and were not members of the Church.

Most priests I know have a "don't ask, don't tell" approach to names submitted for commemoration in the Prosthesis.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page