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Author Topic: Receiving Communion  (Read 7835 times) Average Rating: 0
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John of the North
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« on: January 19, 2008, 03:01:54 AM »

Ok, so I've received the Eucharist with the Ukrainians, the Antiochians, and in a Greek monastery with an OCA priest at the chalice....and I've noticed one thing with the Ukrainians that never happened anywhere else (now that I think about it, it might have happened at the monastery, I do remember the nun called me back for something else, not this though). After receiving, I always kissed the chalice. Not that it was an option, something I chose to do, but that that is just how you did it. I do remember reading a book during my catechumenate about the Liturgy (it was by a former hierarch in Finland I believe) that mentions kissing the chalice, but that's it.

Can anyone enlighten me as to what the representation is here, who does it, who doesn't do it, and why?
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2008, 03:13:44 AM »

Ok, so I've received the Eucharist with the Ukrainians, the Antiochians, and in a Greek monastery with an OCA priest at the chalice....and I've noticed one thing with the Ukrainians that never happened anywhere else (now that I think about it, it might have happened at the monastery, I do remember the nun called me back for something else, not this though). After receiving, I always kissed the chalice. Not that it was an option, something I chose to do, but that that is just how you did it. I do remember reading a book during my catechumenate about the Liturgy (it was by a former hierarch in Finland I believe) that mentions kissing the chalice, but that's it.

Can anyone enlighten me as to what the representation is here, who does it, who doesn't do it, and why?

I was taught that as a woman I was not to touch the chalice.... ever.
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2008, 03:19:19 AM »

In the Armenian Church we don't kiss the chalice, and I don't think any of the other OO churches do that either.  However, I think I have seen that in an OCA Church.
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2008, 04:05:30 AM »

I'm not exactly sure why those who kiss the chalice do, and why those who don't don't.  All I know is that the Greeks, as a rule, do not--only the clergy are allowed to touch the chalice in any way for any reason--and the Russians and their ecclesiastical descendants (i.e., the OCA) do.
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2008, 04:57:46 AM »

I'm not exactly sure why those who kiss the chalice do, and why those who don't don't.  All I know is that the Greeks, as a rule, do not--only the clergy are allowed to touch the chalice in any way for any reason--and the Russians and their ecclesiastical descendants (i.e., the OCA) do.

As to the "why/why not", I believe the Slavic practice is to kiss it out of reverence and the Greek practice is to NOT kiss it because you have just received Communion.  Corresponding to this Greek non-kissing practice, I've heard that they sometimes don't kiss the priests hand for the dismissal either and just take a piece of antidoron in their palm at the dismissal, but don't quote me on this.  I think I just read it here, but for some reason seem to recall seeing it happen at a parish I visited.
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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2008, 05:10:00 AM »

The faithful of the Russian Orthodox Church are taught to always kiss the bottom part of the Chalice after communion "as if you are kissing the side of Christ."

The priest's hand must NOT be kissed at this time, only the Chalice.

The priest does the same himself when he has drunk from the Chalice.  He kisses the side and he says at the same time "Behold this has touched my lips and shall purge away all mine iniquities and cleanse my sins."

These are the words of Isaiah (Isaiah 6:7)   Like virtually every phrase in the Liturgy, they are taken directly from the holy Bible.
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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2008, 05:18:00 AM »

Though I've seen it done it's generally not accepted practice in the Greek Church...nor is venerating the Icon when coming up for communion. I have heard of a priest chastising the faithful for venerating the icon when the Prototype is present.
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2008, 11:22:25 AM »

At my GOA parish kissing the chalice is not an option because our Priest is concerned about accidents in spilling the blessed sacrament.

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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2008, 02:19:31 PM »

Though I've seen it done it's generally not accepted practice in the Greek Church...nor is venerating the Icon when coming up for communion. I have heard of a priest chastising the faithful for venerating the icon when the Prototype is present.

Almost everyone in my parish venerates icons before they go to communion.  Personally I think it's wrong, but I never say anything, not being a member of the baba (yia yia) brigade. Wink  Do people think that they will get extra blagodatz from doing this before they commune?   Everyone seems to think that they are supposed to do it.   There are lots of people who kiss icons after communion too, which I have heard one is never supposed to do.  But what can you do.  I learned when I first started serving in the altar that you are never supposed to kiss the priest's hand when you give him the censer after communion either. 
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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2008, 06:07:10 PM »

Response to Reply #4- The faithful in the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, do kiss the priest's hand as they receive the antidoron from him.
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« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2008, 07:52:02 PM »

Almost everyone in my parish venerates icons before they go to communion.  Personally I think it's wrong, but I never say anything, not being a member of the baba (yia yia) brigade. Wink  Do people think that they will get extra blagodatz from doing this before they commune?   
This is the norm in the parishes and monasteries of Serbia.  I cannot speak for other couuntries.  While the Doors are closed and the priest is communing, the people getting ready to commune go round the icons, kissing them and asking forgiveness of the holy personages in the icons.   If they see someone in the church and they feel they need to ask forgiveness from that person they will make a waist bow in front of him or her.

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« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2008, 11:07:24 PM »

Almost everyone in my parish venerates icons before they go to communion. 

Many people do so in Ukraine as well.

Also, Fr. Bohdan Kutuza from Ukraine expressed his agreement with veneration of icons after communion with that fact that veneration of something holy never was a sin.
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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2008, 12:38:24 AM »

Ok, so I've received the Eucharist with the Ukrainians, the Antiochians, and in a Greek monastery with an OCA priest at the chalice....and I've noticed one thing with the Ukrainians that never happened anywhere else (now that I think about it, it might have happened at the monastery, I do remember the nun called me back for something else, not this though). After receiving, I always kissed the chalice. Not that it was an option, something I chose to do, but that that is just how you did it. I do remember reading a book during my catechumenate about the Liturgy (it was by a former hierarch in Finland I believe) that mentions kissing the chalice, but that's it.

Can anyone enlighten me as to what the representation is here, who does it, who doesn't do it, and why?
Although I belong to a Church of Slavic background (OCA), our priest has specifically told us not to kiss the chalice. His point is you've just received the Body and Blood of Christ what more grace do you hope to receive.

He also mentioned that in the Slavic tradition before frequent Communion was practiced it was common for parishioners to come up and receive a blessing during Communion. He says he occasionally has an older Russian lady come up during communion expecting a "bonk" on the head.  Grin


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« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2008, 02:03:44 AM »

My experience has been that in the Antiochian churches some people do kiss the chalice, and in the Greek churches some people do kiss the priest's hand when receiving the antidoron, although I have seen an Antiochian priest get upset and pull his hand away very fast when someone tried to kiss his hand.

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« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2008, 03:04:23 AM »

Hmm...seems like a wide bit of difference here. Very interesting.
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« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2008, 04:23:33 AM »

This is the norm in the parishes and monasteries of Serbia.  I cannot speak for other couuntries.  While the Doors are closed and the priest is communing, the people getting ready to commune go round the icons, kissing them and asking forgiveness of the holy personages in the icons.   If they see someone in the church and they feel they need to ask forgiveness from that person they will make a waist bow in front of him or her.

Father, bless.

With all due respect, this is not the same thing that I am talking about.  In the situation I am describing, the people kiss the icon on the analogion that is convenient for them to kiss while they are lined up to receive communion.  This is often an icon of a feast; it may be a saint or Christ or the Theotokos too. 

It seems to me that the practice you are describing is appropriate if one is receiving communion infrequently, but to do so if one is receiving on a regular basis it would seem to me to be a lot to do.  Correct me if I'm wrong, but...I'm not surprised at what you describe, since many Serbs seem to go through a very lengthy preparation before receiving communion, including a strenuous fasting regimen. 
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« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2008, 09:54:47 AM »

Father, bless.

This is not the same thing that I am talking about.  In the situation I am describing, the people kiss the icon on the analogion that is convenient for them to kiss while they are lined up to receive communion.  This is often an icon of a feast; it may be a saint or Christ or the Theotokos too. 

It seems to me that the practice you are describing is appropriate if one is receiving communion infrequently, but to do so if one is receiving on a regular basis it would seem to me to be a lot to do.  Correct me if I'm wrong, but...I'm not surprised at what you describe, since many Serbs seem to go through a very lengthy preparation before receiving communion, including a strenuous fasting regimen. 

I think its more of a slavic custom to kiss the icon on the Tetrapod before communion because generally in slavic churches, its sitting very close to the solea (bottom step). In many of the Greek churches I've been to (in Chicago area mind you) the icon of the feast and the tetrapod are usually in the back of the church blocking entrance to the center. Therefore, the whole church isn't going to go to the narthex, venerate, and then go to communion, rather they simply come out of the pews and move forward.

I think of it like stopping for a coffee when I'm on my way to breakfast, I know I'm going to get coffee with breakfast, but the Dunkin Doughnuts by my house roasts such good coffee.  laugh

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« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2008, 10:41:25 AM »

This is the norm in the parishes and monasteries of Serbia.  I cannot speak for other couuntries.  While the Doors are closed and the priest is communing, the people getting ready to commune go round the icons, kissing them and asking forgiveness of the holy personages in the icons.   If they see someone in the church and they feel they need to ask forgiveness from that person they will make a waist bow in front of him or her.



This seems to be common in Slavic parishes.  In the ROCA parish I attend, in two Serbian parishes I have been to, and in one very Russian OCA one, this was the case in all of them.
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« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2008, 11:17:51 AM »

I think of it like stopping for a coffee when I'm on my way to breakfast, I know I'm going to get coffee with breakfast, but the Dunkin Doughnuts by my house roasts such good coffee.

It does seem to be rather like this in my parish, though I can't read people's minds or hearts.
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« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2008, 12:15:41 PM »

Growing up in the Antiochian Orthodox Church I was taught not to kiss the chalice. But I have seen some do it because we tend to get folks from a variety of backgrounds attending our churches.
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« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2008, 02:37:27 PM »

In the Antiochian Church, it usually depends on the influence that the parish has come under.Those who have Russian roots or influences tend to kiss the chalice, while those who have Greek influence will not kiss the chalice. One must remember older parishes in the Antiochian Church fell under the Russians and have Russian traditions.  Many Antiochian convert parishes have read much of Russian spirituality and follow some of the Russian traditions.

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« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2008, 03:30:40 PM »

The best thing to do is if the priest lifts the chalice after you receive, kiss it.  If he doesn't lift the chalice after you receive do not kiss the chalice.  I should repeat that.  Let us have a little review:

If the priest  lifts the chalice after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.



Since we're Orthodox and do things in threes, let's have another review.

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.



Perhaps one more lesson, if a priest/bishop tells you what I wrote above, follow his instruction.  It makes the whole process smoother and less stressful for the entire community and the clergy, whether sub-deacon, deacon, priest or bishop who is distributing Communion

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


Thank you for listening and please remember


If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


As far as kissing the icon on the tetrapod, we are not to be at Church worrying about such actions of others.  We are at the Liturgy to worship, pray, focus on God through the Liturgy and to do so with those present and the Orthodox throughout worshiping in union with us.  We are to focus on Christ and if we are prepared, we receive Communion, for it is Christ who unites us all.   
My suggestion is to follow the practice of the community.  If the priest instructs otherwise at a homily then LISTEN TO HIM. 
And as always, follow the above advice given in bold lettering.  If your parish kisses the icon before Communion and no word has been given not to, it is therefore an accepted small tradition. 


Perhaps one more piece of instruction is while visiting another parish call the priest before you arrive.  Discuss with him what he requires for you to receive communion and at that time you may ask the customs of the parish. 

But always remember

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.
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« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2008, 07:54:12 PM »

The best thing to do is if the priest lifts the chalice after you receive, kiss it.  If he doesn't lift the chalice after you receive do not kiss the chalice.  I should repeat that.  Let us have a little review:

If the priest  lifts the chalice after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.



Since we're Orthodox and do things in threes, let's have another review.

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.



Perhaps one more lesson, if a priest/bishop tells you what I wrote above, follow his instruction.  It makes the whole process smoother and less stressful for the entire community and the clergy, whether sub-deacon, deacon, priest or bishop who is distributing Communion

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


Thank you for listening and please remember


If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


As far as kissing the icon on the tetrapod, we are not to be at Church worrying about such actions of others.  We are at the Liturgy to worship, pray, focus on God through the Liturgy and to do so with those present and the Orthodox throughout worshiping in union with us.  We are to focus on Christ and if we are prepared, we receive Communion, for it is Christ who unites us all.   
My suggestion is to follow the practice of the community.  If the priest instructs otherwise at a homily then LISTEN TO HIM. 
And as always, follow the above advice given in bold lettering.  If your parish kisses the icon before Communion and no word has been given not to, it is therefore an accepted small tradition. 


Perhaps one more piece of instruction is while visiting another parish call the priest before you arrive.  Discuss with him what he requires for you to receive communion and at that time you may ask the customs of the parish. 

But always remember

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


I find the repeated assertion of what we are or are not to do, combined with the repeated bolding of that assertion and overall condescending tone of the lecture to be insulting in the extreme.  I don't attempt to tell you how you should or should not act in your parish.  It's a shame you don't think I'm deservig of the same courtesy.
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« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2008, 08:05:59 PM »

This seems to be common in Slavic parishes.  In the ROCA parish I attend, in two Serbian parishes I have been to, and in one very Russian OCA one, this was the case in all of them.

Interesting.  I've never seen this in Russian parishes that I've been to , but that probably just means that I have to visit more Russian churches.
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« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2008, 08:10:02 PM »

With all due respect, this is not the same thing that I am talking about.  In the situation I am describing, the people kiss the icon on the analogion that is convenient for them to kiss while they are lined up to receive communion.  This is often an icon of a feast; it may be a saint or Christ or the Theotokos too.
CAUTION:  DO NOT take the following as any kind of advice to do something other than what your parish tradition requires of you.

My priest actually put an end to this practice in our parish.  He figures that, when we are in line to receive Communion, keeping our minds and hearts focused on the Sacrament is more important than venerating an icon.  Some people still venerate the icons on their way to Communion, though.  I guess old habits aren't broken overnight.
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« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2008, 08:28:02 PM »

My priest actually put an end to this practice in our parish.  He figures that, when we are in line to receive Communion, keeping our minds and hearts focused on the Sacrament is more important than venerating an icon. 

That's what I think.  Who are we to focus on icons when the King of All is present to give Himself to us as food. 

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« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2008, 08:42:35 PM »

As far as kissing the icon on the tetrapod, we are not to be at Church worrying about such actions of others.  We are at the Liturgy to worship, pray, focus on God through the Liturgy and to do so with those present and the Orthodox throughout worshiping in union with us.  We are to focus on Christ and if we are prepared, we receive Communion, for it is Christ who unites us all. 

Agreed.

Quote
If your parish kisses the icon before Communion and no word has been given not to, it is therefore an accepted small tradition. 

Disagreed.  There are all kinds of "small traditions" that are basically "folkodoxy", and I do not feel compelled to follow them, but rather quite the reverse.  Of course, I go along with lots of erroneus things because of your quote above.  (The tradition described by Irish Hermit is one that I am ignorant of and do not feel qualified to truly evaluate.  Neither do I feel qualified to discern what is in the hearts of others, as I intimated earlier in this thread.)   I never mention my opinion about these things to others unless I am asked to.  Perhaps I should not discuss them on an internet forum, I don't know.  I am used to discussing various things of this nature in the context of theological study, and see this board as an extension of that kind of environment.  Also, the laity are guardians of Tradition.  Just because we need to be humble doesn't mean that we are supposed to check our intellect at the door every time we enter a church. 
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« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2008, 12:35:16 AM »

The best thing to do is if the priest lifts the chalice after you receive, kiss it.  If he doesn't lift the chalice after you receive do not kiss the chalice.  I should repeat that.  Let us have a little review:

If the priest  lifts the chalice after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.



Since we're Orthodox and do things in threes, let's have another review.

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.



Perhaps one more lesson, if a priest/bishop tells you what I wrote above, follow his instruction.  It makes the whole process smoother and less stressful for the entire community and the clergy, whether sub-deacon, deacon, priest or bishop who is distributing Communion

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


Thank you for listening and please remember


If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


As far as kissing the icon on the tetrapod, we are not to be at Church worrying about such actions of others.  We are at the Liturgy to worship, pray, focus on God through the Liturgy and to do so with those present and the Orthodox throughout worshiping in union with us.  We are to focus on Christ and if we are prepared, we receive Communion, for it is Christ who unites us all.   
My suggestion is to follow the practice of the community.  If the priest instructs otherwise at a homily then LISTEN TO HIM. 
And as always, follow the above advice given in bold lettering.  If your parish kisses the icon before Communion and no word has been given not to, it is therefore an accepted small tradition. 


Perhaps one more piece of instruction is while visiting another parish call the priest before you arrive.  Discuss with him what he requires for you to receive communion and at that time you may ask the customs of the parish. 

But always remember

If the priest lifts the chalice  after you receive then kiss the chalice.

If the priest DOES NOT LIFT THE CHALICE AT ALL AFTER YOU RECEIVE do not ATTEMPT to kiss the chalice.


Ok, the repetition was more for fun.  Bottom line, to prevent confusion and the possible spilling of the Chalice just follow the parish custom.  Sometimes if the parish priest does not lift the chalice and someone tries to kiss the chalice (which isn't lifted away from the cloth, the priest, the Altarservers) it leads to having Communion spilled.  Next time I won't get carried away and repeat it!
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« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2008, 12:40:43 PM »

I am comfortable doing what I have been taught. I do not kiss the chalice because it is not a part of the Antiochian tradition. I really doubt a priest will get upset over this issue if his tradition is different.
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« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2008, 01:30:57 PM »

At the Antiochian parishes I've been to, everyone kissed the chalice.
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« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2008, 01:51:59 PM »

At the Antiochian parishes I've been to, everyone kissed the chalice.

Thomas said some Antiochian parishes follow Russian customs. But the Antiochian parishes I have attended do not teach this custom. However, I have seen certain individuals kiss the chalice in Antiochian parishes. These folks are usually are from Slavic backgrounds or they are converts who must have been chrismated in parishes that followed this custom.
As a child, I was taught by our priest not to kiss the chalice. I actually have never seen an Antiochian priest hold the chalice up so the communicant can kiss it. I include my bishop in that category, because at one  of our retreats he administered the communion and he held the chalice close. He did not hold it up so the communicants could kiss it. He was a part of the Antiochian patriarchate before he was assigned to America so I assume he knows what the Antiochian custom should be.
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« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2008, 02:55:38 PM »

Snicker...reminds me of my first time communing in a parish not of my home jurisdiction (GOA). I had a couple of deer-in-the-headlights moments before I realized the ROCOR priest was offering me the Chalice to kiss.
Never have seen this in Greek parishes but our ACROD priest seems to remember who wishes to kiss the Chalice as he offers this to some of us, but not all. Good memory...
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« Reply #32 on: January 22, 2008, 03:05:29 PM »

 There are lots of people who kiss icons after communion too,

we dont kiss the chalice, and kiss whichever icon is on the side we are leaving on (Chrisrt is on the right, Mary on the left, just depends on where you are sitting, unless you go the other way for whatever reason)
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« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2008, 03:08:22 PM »

Snicker...reminds me of my first time communing in a parish not of my home jurisdiction (GOA). I had a couple of deer-in-the-headlights moments before I realized the ROCOR priest was offering me the Chalice to kiss.
Never have seen this in Greek parishes but our ACROD priest seems to remember who wishes to kiss the Chalice as he offers this to some of us, but not all. Good memory...

Yes. I had that happen to me once too by a priest from another jurisdiction who was filling in for our priest. I just looked at it for a second. But the strangest thing that ever happened during communion was when a Palestinian immigrant woman returned from her trip in Jerusalem with a whole box of lace headcoverings. She stood near the front of the communion line holding up a lace mantilla for each woman to take so they could cover their heads before they communed ( 99% of the women had uncovered heads). Most just stared at her in disbelief. It was very odd. The next week the priest did not allow her to do it.
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« Reply #34 on: January 24, 2008, 09:32:38 AM »

Unless she was taking them back after communion, It seems to me the giving of the lace mandilla's may have been her way of sharing something from the Holy Land.  Several years ago, we had a Russian parishioner do likewise when she came back from the Holy Land, except she stood at the doorway and gave them out with father's blessing as women and teens came into the Church/ Some wore them to take communion and others just held them.  I later saw some of them drapped over the icons of the Theotokos in the homes of the women who did not use them as head coverings.  There were no hard feelings, just good feelings toward a lady who did not speak much English and was now more attached to the women in the parish because of her sharing of her special gift.

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« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2008, 10:08:19 AM »

Wonderful anecdote, Thomas, and a great way to understand something from a different angle!
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« Reply #36 on: January 24, 2008, 01:00:25 PM »

Unless she was taking them back after communion, It seems to me the giving of the lace mandilla's may have been her way of sharing something from the Holy Land.  Several years ago, we had a Russian parishioner do likewise when she came back from the Holy Land, except she stood at the doorway and gave them out with father's blessing as women and teens came into the Church/ Some wore them to take communion and others just held them.  I later saw some of them drapped over the icons of the Theotokos in the homes of the women who did not use them as head coverings.  There were no hard feelings, just good feelings toward a lady who did not speak much English and was now more attached to the women in the parish because of her sharing of her special gift.

Thomas

It was an awkward situation that happened without warning. Very few ladies put them on their heads. Then when they were done communing they gave them back. It appeared that she wanted them back so that each week should could hand them out again. But the priest wouldn't allow her to do it the following week.
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« Reply #37 on: January 24, 2008, 09:25:01 PM »

Unless she was taking them back after communion, It seems to me the giving of the lace mandilla's may have been her way of sharing something from the Holy Land.Thomas
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What awful sexism!  Nothing for the men!!

When our Starosta returned from the Holy Land he brought small candles/tapers from the Church of the Resurrection and gave everyone in church a candle. 
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« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2008, 02:17:06 AM »

I am comfortable doing what I have been taught. I do not kiss the chalice because it is not a part of the Antiochian tradition. I really doubt a priest will get upset over this issue if his tradition is different.

If the priest lifts the chalice and you forget to kiss the chalice, or do not kiss the chalice because you are used to not doing so (which happens to me sometimes) you aren't really going to spill the chalice.
The problem arises from when the custom at the parish isn't to kiss the chalice and the person goes into kiss the chalice, that is when problems have, do, and can occur. 

Off topic, but we have bread after communion but I miss the practice of having wine as well. 
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« Reply #39 on: April 01, 2008, 12:35:54 PM »

In the OCA and ROCOR parishes I've been to, the priest lifts the chalice for you to kiss, and then brings it down slightly so you can kiss the hand holding the chalice too.  Smiley  When a deacon is serving communion, he lets you kiss the chalice but will pull back if you try to kiss his hand too.

I always kiss the chalice in my Antiochian parish, but I have stopped kissing Father's hand because we have a chalice that is very small, and it's just too awkward to try to kiss his hand too.  I hope he doesn't take it personally.   Grin  I just don't want there to be a spill.  And every time I go to a Greek church, I always have to try very hard to remember not to cross my arms across my chest and to hold up the napkin instead!
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« Reply #40 on: May 26, 2008, 12:00:30 AM »

Quote
He also mentioned that in the Slavic tradition before frequent Communion was practiced it was common for parishioners to come up and receive a blessing during Communion. He says he occasionally has an older Russian lady come up during communion expecting a "bonk" on the head. 


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First of all it is not a "bonk" on the head.  This is a Ukrainian Orthodox tradition.  I do not know if the Russians also have this tradition.  I see it every Sunday and it is not during communion, it is after the comminicants  receive the Holy Mysteries. 

It symbolizes that the "old lady" who comes forward, like the widows of the New Testament we are supposed to visit in their affliction, are under the protection of the church.

Also it reminds the rest of us in the congregation to pray for these widows or aid them with our gifts/help.

I have also seen parents bring up little children who are ill or even a member of the congregation who is very ill and needs our special prayers.

Remember there is a similar tradition during a molebin in which the person being prayed for has the Gospel Book placed on his/her head when the text is chanted.  This also cannot be called a "bonk" on the head.
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« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2008, 10:49:38 AM »



Воістину Воскрес!

In our Ukrainian Orthodox church those who has partaken of Holy Communion, move off to the side and wait for everyone else in line to have their turn.  Once this is completed and the priest re-emerges with the Holy Chalice, everyone moves up, one by one, to have the priest gently touch the Chalice to the tops of their inclined heads.  Many individuals who have not partaken of Holy Communion, for whatever reason, also will rush up and get in line.  Personally, even if it's strictly a "Ukrainian tradition", I think it's wonderful and moving.

As for the earlier posts about kissing the Chalice, in our church once the individual has taken Communion, the priest will slightly lift the Cup so that the person may kiss the Chalice, however, he does NOT allow the kissing of his hand at this point.  Kissing the Chalice is a sign of gratitude and respect.  (If women have lipstick on, it is to be removed prior to approaching for Holy Communion.)

Слава Ісусу Христу на Віки!

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« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2008, 10:35:37 PM »



Слава Ісусу Христу на Віки!



Слава Ісусу Христу!  Слава на Віки! -- is that what you are trying to say! Smiley

The Ukrainian parishes around my area do this sometimes too, the blessing with the chalice on the head for those
who can't or aren't receiving.
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« Reply #43 on: May 30, 2008, 12:14:57 AM »

I do not intend to preach, neither am I qualified to do so, but in the progress of our mutual growth in our Holy Orthodoxy, the priest who I had the honor of being baptized by, Fr. John G. Geraneos, of Blessed Memory, taught that we do not "take," Holy Communion, but "receive" it.
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« Reply #44 on: May 30, 2008, 12:22:22 AM »

I do not intend to preach, neither am I qualified to do so, but in the progress of our mutual growth in our Holy Orthodoxy, the priest who I had the honor of being baptized by, Fr. John G. Geraneos, of Blessed Memory, taught that we do not "take," Holy Communion, but "receive" it.
I do prefer this language myself.  Thanks for the reminder. Smiley
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« Reply #45 on: May 30, 2008, 09:21:15 AM »


Thank you all for your corrections.

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