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Author Topic: Beautiful Libraries  (Read 3572 times) Average Rating: 0
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EofK
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« on: December 31, 2007, 05:12:51 PM »

Here's something for the book fiends (myself included):  The World's Most Beautiful Libraries.  Makes me want to grab a stack and settle into a chair for the afternoon.  My favorite is the Handelingenkamer Tweede Kamer Der Staten-Generaal Den Haag.

Libraries
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« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2007, 05:33:51 PM »

What pictures, thank you!

How come people are still waging wars and kiling each other, when they have all these treasures on shelves...

Happy New Year!

--G.
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2007, 05:55:23 PM »

Makes you wonder, doesn't it?  It makes me so sad to think of how many of these have been destroyed in wars.  Sigh.

Incidentally, I would love my personal library to be that neat and organized!
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« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2007, 10:16:19 PM »

I'm kind of upset that the Library of Congress didn't make the list. I spent quite a lot of time there in the evenings when I worked in DC. The main reading room is absolutely stunning.
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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2007, 10:44:44 PM »

Library of Congress should definitely be on there.

It's a shame that my hometown's library is modeled in a modern 1970s style - yuck!
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« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2007, 11:03:48 PM »

Could be worse. My hometown models libraries on Best Buys.
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2008, 11:19:49 AM »

I'm kind of upset that the Library of Congress didn't make the list. I spent quite a lot of time there in the evenings when I worked in DC. The main reading room is absolutely stunning.

Ask and ye shall receive!  Here 'tis... and it is indeed lovely.

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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2008, 12:24:40 PM »

Could be worse. My hometown models libraries on Best Buys.

At least you have libraries.  Smiley For most of human history most people couldn't read much or at all.

Remember that the first free library in the US was started by Benjamin Franklin in 1731.  And it was Andrew Carnegie who started hundreds upon hundreds of libraries in the US, Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other places.  He started them for working class people and with the open stack system so that one could browse to find books. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_library

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« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2008, 08:37:33 AM »

At least you have libraries.  Smiley For most of human history most people couldn't read much or at all.

True, reading is useful for knowing which CD or DVD you're getting from the library. I'm so glad Carnegie wanted us all to have a free video-rental store in every town. It is nice to have.

Also, what are these "books" of which you speak? And where might I find one? Wink
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« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2008, 10:58:35 AM »

And though Mr. Carnegie was not a religious man, even he would have been scandalized by what one can easily find today in the children's section.

-

I put in a vote for the Sherlock Library, a stunning 17th-century specimen in St. Catharine's College, Cambridge, England.
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« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2008, 12:37:02 PM »

And though Mr. Carnegie was not a religious man, even he would have been scandalized by what one can easily find today in the children's section.

I don't think he would have been that shocked to see children reading.
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« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2008, 12:43:43 PM »

The Sherlock Library:
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« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2008, 01:00:42 PM »

You can't beat my university library for a pleasant mixtures of strangeness and ugliness:

The entrance is underground:


It is 1.5 stories underground, so just to get in and get to the main underground level you have to down two flights of stairs.  To get to DVDs and periodicals it is down another flight of stairs or the books start at one level up.  It is a nightmare for the handicapped and just an eyesore for everybody else. 

The actual library is the huge box behind the palm trees, although there are winding passages who knows how far underground all over:


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« Reply #13 on: January 05, 2008, 01:20:42 PM »

Strange... but that's modern university architecture for you. Tongue
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« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2008, 03:06:05 PM »

Strange... but that's modern university architecture for you. Tongue

That's the most logical part of the campus.  What is the most hideous is the architecture building (which is typical since they try too hard to make some sort of avant garde statement):


Whenever my sister makes fun of me for being a "liberal artist" I need only mention that she has a degree in architecture from that building  Cheesy

And the most stupid ASU architecture belongs to our current president's glass box fetish:


And the newest one:


Ever been inside a glass box when it is 115 F (about 45 C) outside?  For all this talk of green this and green that, one would think a university of all places would be interested in low cost and energy efficient architecture. 
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« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2008, 04:41:44 PM »

And the newest one:


Ever been inside a glass box when it is 115 F (about 45 C) outside?  For all this talk of green this and green that, one would think a university of all places would be interested in low cost and energy efficient architecture. 
Talk about a greenhouse! Shocked  I just hope that glass wall isn't on the building's south side.
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« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2008, 05:01:36 PM »

Talk about a greenhouse! Shocked  I just hope that glass wall isn't on the building's south side.

If only.  The big glass thing is a due south exposure. 
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« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2008, 06:16:47 PM »

Here's something for the book fiends (myself included):  The World's Most Beautiful Libraries.  Makes me want to grab a stack and settle into a chair for the afternoon.  My favorite is the Handelingenkamer Tweede Kamer Der Staten-Generaal Den Haag.

Libraries
Thanks kindly for these pictures.
The libraries are great. Do these libraries have open or closed stacks? Of course, generally, I would prefer a library with open stacks so that one would be able to browse. I saw a few nice libraries in Eastern Europe, but with some of them, they have the policy of closed stacks and the book must be requested. If two libraries had the same collection and if it were to be a choice between a beautiful library with closed stacks, and an ugly library with open stacks, generally, I would choose the ugly library with the open stacks. Although, still,  it would be nice just to do some reading and study in the beautiful one with closed stacks while waiting for your book to show up.
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« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2008, 06:31:41 PM »

I agree completely!

Going to a library with open stacks makes me feel free.

A closed stack library is like trying to read a good book in your dentist's waiting room! Wink
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« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2008, 07:15:12 PM »

The Sherlock Library:


That only shows one small section of it. I took a long view shot of it, and I would post it if my photo CDs were not packed away.

I spent many hapy hours studying there, sitting on the window sill and dangling my legs over into the courtyard.
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« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2008, 10:50:31 PM »

I was browsing through some old photos of my grandparents and when my mom was a kid from the 50's to the early 70's and everything looked so grande- people, cars, mere things and architecture. I always wonder why our society has gone away from what is beautiful to becoming more and more plain,ugly yet more and more complicated and expensive. 12 years ago I lived on a street where everyone talked to each other and knew everyone else by name...we moved couple times and ever since then its like people have a tick or flinch if you wave or say hi to them.

Back to arhcitecture



This is our Union Station in Toronto...I think theres one by the same name in NY??



Above is our fabulous CNE Place...it looks like France but its not, in fact most of Toronto looks like somethng European.
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« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2008, 10:34:51 AM »

This is our Union Station in Toronto...I think theres one by the same name in NY??

There is a Union Station in many cities in the U.S. It goes back to the days of the Civil War when railroads were vital in shipping goods to the soldiers. In some of the "border towns" you'll find both a Union Station and a Confederate Station, although the latter usually has been renamed.
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« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2008, 10:46:34 PM »

There is a Union Station in many cities in the U.S. It goes back to the days of the Civil War when railroads were vital in shipping goods to the soldiers. In some of the "border towns" you'll find both a Union Station and a Confederate Station, although the latter usually has been renamed.

Um, no. Union stations are stations that serve(d) more than one railroad.
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« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2008, 11:25:51 PM »

Yes, they were Grin (although I was hoping someone would bite on the "Confederate Station" bit).

A page of links to several Union Stations throughout the United States. I find Washington D.C.'s to be quite beautiful; I've been there a couple of times.
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« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2008, 11:35:27 PM »

Nice try, Mr. Clavin!  Wink
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« Reply #25 on: January 09, 2008, 01:15:52 PM »

All of those libraries are beautiful!  Shocked
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« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2008, 02:08:03 PM »

Ah, now you're on a subject after my own heart!

I'm sad that the US Senate Library reading room in the Captial (btw, the Senate Library is not a part of the LOC, but a different entitity entirely) is not on the list.  Sadly, it's now the senate leadership's private reading room, but it's a beautiful room with a fantastic round window that looks out from the capital towards the Washington Monument.  It's the one thing I do miss about working for the gov't.

I love the picture of the cathedral library with the chained books!
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« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2008, 12:44:23 PM »

Yes, they were Grin (although I was hoping someone would bite on the "Confederate Station" bit).

Ha!  Grin  Thought there wouldn't be any railfans around the forum? 

 Wink

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« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2008, 05:29:08 PM »

They don't show up 'round these parts nearly as often as "South Shall Rise Again" folk. Cheesy
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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2008, 11:21:42 AM »

They don't show up 'round these parts nearly as often as "South Shall Rise Again" folk. Cheesy

Maybe they're out looking at trains?  Wink 

Or maybe the topic just hadn't come up.  I wonder if there might be some interest in a "What hobbies/interests do you have?" thread.  To go along with the "Reading" and "Listening" ones.

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« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2008, 11:50:40 AM »

Here's a thread from way back with hobbies and interest.  Why not resurrect it?

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,2596.0.html
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« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2008, 12:58:34 PM »

I'd forgotten about that one!  <smacks forehead>
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« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2008, 01:17:20 PM »

LOL!  Don't smack too hard...
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« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2008, 02:01:30 PM »

I love the picture of the cathedral library with the chained books!

Yes, I saw that library at Hereford Cathedral. It's really worth seeing, and the cathedral also has probably the most magnificent medieval world map still in existence. The cathedral itself is also wonderful.

The whole Herefordshire area is one of my favorite in England. Beautiful and unspoilt, remarkably free of tourist hordes. It's a wonderful look at pre-industrial England.
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« Reply #34 on: January 16, 2008, 02:42:22 PM »

The Lake District is my favorite part of Britain...

But for me, my favorite library is whichever one I am in at the time!
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« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2008, 03:06:31 PM »

The Lake District is my favorite part of Britain...

It's lovely. Overall, I love the North, Cumbria (Lake District), North Yorkshire, Durham and Northumberland included. If I could not be in the North, however, I would be in the Welsh Marches (which include Herefordshire, Shropshire, Cheshire, western Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire).
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