Author Topic: Chess Resignations  (Read 1649 times)

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Online PeterTheAleut

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Chess Resignations
« on: December 22, 2007, 04:54:20 AM »
I just resigned a chess match, but when my opponent tried to move after my resignation, the move registered and resumed the game.  Then when I resigned again, the second resignation counted as a SECOND loss of the SAME MATCH.  What's up with that? ???
« Last Edit: December 22, 2007, 05:05:36 AM by PeterTheAleut »
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Offline Robert

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Re: Chess Resignations
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2007, 11:52:24 AM »
Other side has to "accept" your resignation.


Online PeterTheAleut

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Re: Chess Resignations
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2007, 05:19:35 PM »
Other side has to "accept" your resignation.


But then, why isn't the first resignation rescinded if it isn't accepted?  Two wins/losses in one match?
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Offline Robert

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Re: Chess Resignations
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2007, 12:03:28 PM »
LOL Not sure..I'll look into it.

Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Chess Resignations
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2007, 12:29:45 PM »
Other side has to "accept" your resignation.


Is it the same with a 'DRAW'?  In other words, if N is losing to X and has absolutely no way of winning or rebounding, can N simply hit 'DRAW' without X getting the chance to 'accept' or 'reject'?  This happened to me a few months back.  It seems that if N recognized he/she was losing and had no way of rebounding, the proper thing to do would be to select 'resign' and not 'draw' as the latter indicates that neither player can possibly win (as in the case of each player having only their King).
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Online PeterTheAleut

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Re: Chess Resignations
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2007, 06:03:03 PM »
Is it the same with a 'DRAW'?  In other words, if N is losing to X and has absolutely no way of winning or rebounding, can N simply hit 'DRAW' without X getting the chance to 'accept' or 'reject'?  This happened to me a few months back.  It seems that if N recognized he/she was losing and had no way of rebounding, the proper thing to do would be to select 'resign' and not 'draw' as the latter indicates that neither player can possibly win (as in the case of each player having only their King).
When I requested a draw awhile back, the draw would not register until my opponent accepted it, which is the way a draw works when playing chess offline.  A resignation, however, should not require the approval of my opponent--if I quit because my case is hopeless, I concede defeat.  Should I require that my opponent consent to me giving him the win?

There is also the special case of draw known as a stalemate, which happens when one player has no legal moves available but is NOT in check.
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