OrthodoxChristianity.net
August 22, 2014, 02:18:22 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What is the Western Rite doing this year for Advent?  (Read 2305 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,785



« on: December 18, 2007, 01:33:18 PM »

What is the Orthodox Christian Western Rite doing for Advent this year? How do you observe it?

Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Ian Lazarus
The Main Man!
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: AOA
Posts: 1,545


yIjah, Qey' 'oH!


« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2007, 02:05:13 PM »

AFAIK, the Western rite holds to the same fasting traditions as the Eastern. 
Logged

"For I am With thee, withersoever thou goest"

Joshua 1:9
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2007, 03:36:51 PM »

Wow, I was always under the impression the AWRV fasting regime was more Western (like, Pre-1950s RCC-ish).
Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
Fr. David
The Poster Formerly Known as "Pedro"
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA, Diocese of the South
Posts: 2,828



WWW
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2007, 03:56:39 PM »

IIRC, they go by one meal a day, never before 3, and never a full serving.  As to what foods can be consumed, they are much less strict.

AFAIK, this is how fasting in many parts of the West was done.
Logged

Priest in the Orthodox Church in America - ordained on March 18, 2012

Oh Taste and See (my defunct blog)

From Protestant to Orthodox (my conversion story)
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2007, 04:06:53 PM »

I remember reading somewhere that is varied a lot.  The fasting was one meal a day, the abstinence was less strict.  But they suggested that one follow the Benedictine monastic fasting practice is they want a more challenging fast (or the Eastern fasting practice).
Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
kaarina33
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian/Western Rite
Posts: 52



« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2007, 02:26:07 AM »

I remember reading somewhere that is varied a lot.  The fasting was one meal a day, the abstinence was less strict.  But they suggested that one follow the Benedictine monastic fasting practice is they want a more challenging fast (or the Eastern fasting practice).

You are correct:Here are the guidelines we received at the beginning of Advent;
Very clear instructions, but always options for a more strict fast with the permission of one's Father Confessor:

 Smiley

Orthodox churches of the Western Rite adhere to the discipline of fasting and abstinence according to the Latin tradition.

Our Parish follows the prescriptions for this fast as directed in the annual Ordo of the Western Rite Vicariate of the Self-Ruled Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America.


Fasting & Abstinence in Advent, 2007
 

FASTING consists in eating but one full meal in a day, and that not before noon. A collation, or about one-fourth of a meal, is allowed in the evening.

ABSTINENCE refers to refraining from flesh meat (pork, beef, chicken, etc.) and the juice or broth
thereof (soup, etc.) Eggs, milk, or its products, or seasoning, are not forbidden in the Latin tradition.

All Orthodox communicants and catechumens in the Western tradition are asked to
follow these rules; however, only those between the ages of 21 and 60 are obligated to
observe the fasts of the Church, and those who have completed their seventh year of
age are bound to the law of abstinence.

In the Western tradition, the Advent fast consists of
Fasting on all Wednesdays in Advent
Fasting and abstinence on all Fridays in Advent
Fasting and abstinence on Ember Wednesday, Ember Friday and Ember
Saturday in Advent.
Fasting and abstinence on the Vigil of the Nativity (24 December)

This year this means that you are to make every effort to
Fast on Wednesday, 5 December
Fast & abstain on Friday, 7 December
Fast on Wednesday, 12 December
Fast & abstain on Friday, 14 December
Fast & abstain on Wednesday, 19 December
Fast & abstain on Friday, 21 December
Fast & abstain on Saturday, 22 December
Fast & abstain on Monday, 24 December

Those who desire to imitate more austere fasting practices, such as those of the Byzantine Rite,
should do so only after consulting with their Father Confessor.
Logged

We are always living God's future in a broken present,
the Gospel is always a word of reconciliation from God's future spoken ahead of its time"
Rowan
Lurker, Writer, Science-lover, yada yada yada...
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Episcopalian
Posts: 159

-- Defying Gravity --


« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2007, 02:00:41 PM »

So besides fasting, what else do you do? Any special services that would ring a bell with us in the Western world?
Logged

Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things. ~Philippians 4:8; St Paul
kaarina33
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian/Western Rite
Posts: 52



« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2007, 04:45:25 AM »

Of course, our Divine Liturgy is more somber; The Gloria in Excelsis is omitted, except on feast days(I can give you a more complete list of Feasts that fall in Advent when I have more time), and other differences in our Liturgy  and Divine Offices also reflect the penitential emphasis of the season. 

We use Gregorian Chant at Divine Liturgy, Vespers on Sat. Eve and Lauds on Sunday morning. There have been  changes in the Psalm modes; antiphons are rich with themes of Old Testament Prophecies and brimming with references to the fulfillment for those who wait in expectation, the fulfillment of hope and the Dawning of the Light that banishes darkness forever; coming of the Light and expectation of of Darkness and the Dawn of the coming of the Light;
Some of our Divine Office Hymns may be familiar Vespers:CONDITOR SAlma siderum/Creator of the Stars of Night; VOX clara ecce intonat/ Hark! A thrilling voice is sounding, and  AETERNE rerum conditor/ Eternal Creator of the world and, of course, Veni, Veni Emmanuel/ O Come O Come Emmanuel which is a synthesis of the great "O Antiphons" that are used for Vespers during the octave before Christmas (Dec. 17-23).

Even our  Marion hymn, sung at all the offices changes.  We will be singing "Alma Redemptoris Mater" through Epiphany; is woven through with some of these same themes.

Quote
Loving mother of the Redeemer,
gate of heaven, star of the sea,
assist your people who have fallen yet strive to rise again.
To the wonderment of nature you bore your Creator,
Yet remained a virgin after as before.
You who received Gabriel's joyful greeting,
have pity on us poor sinners.




Logged

We are always living God's future in a broken present,
the Gospel is always a word of reconciliation from God's future spoken ahead of its time"
Jakub
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,747



« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2007, 01:04:28 AM »

Some of our Divine Office Hymns may be familiar Vespers:CONDITOR SAlma siderum/Creator of the Stars of Night; VOX clara ecce intonat/ Hark! A thrilling voice is sounding, and  AETERNE rerum conditor/ Eternal Creator of the world and, of course, Veni, Veni Emmanuel/ O Come O Come Emmanuel which is a synthesis of the great "O Antiphons" that are used for Vespers during the octave before Christmas (Dec. 17-23).

Even our  Marion hymn, sung at all the offices changes.  We will be singing "Alma Redemptoris Mater" through Epiphany; is woven through with some of these same themes.



You could say it is a mirror image of the Roman Liturgy of the Hours...

james
Logged

An old timer is a man who's had a lot of interesting experiences -- some of them true.

Grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway, the good fortune to run into the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.06 seconds with 36 queries.