Author Topic: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression  (Read 5735 times)

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Offline paradoxy

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Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« on: November 24, 2007, 04:52:15 PM »
What is the Orthodox answer to Post Partum Depression?

From what I've read, many fathers would consider depression a sin, or at least a consequence of sin - spiritual sloth, despair, etc.

I've talked to my spiritual father and another priest about my problem and they just didn't seem to understand - I'm a young mother, blessed with a beautiful baby - I'm supposed to be happy. And I should pray more.

My problem is that when I'm down in the pit, I can't really pray. The only thing I can say and mean it it "God please kill me". I always have the image in my head of Peter trying to walk on water, starting to drown and crying out to the Lord to save him. But how do you cry out if you're already under water?

I'm afraid to talk to anyone about my problem. If I think about trying to talk to the Orthodox I stop myself because I feel it's just my fault because I'm obviously too slothful, proud, and selfish to be a good mother - which is true,but I don't always believe that's the ONLY cause for my feelings, and I'd like to be able to share them without fear of judgement. I'm afraid enough posting anonymously on a forum. Not that Orthodox people really judge me, but I'm too vulnerable to try.  :-[ And yes, pride is my problem.

I'm also afraid to talk to non-religious people in my life, because, from their perspective, it's really all my fault too - I was the one who insisted on getting married so young, and not using contraceptives until we were a bit readier for a baby, and living in absolute secluded wilderness (our only option right now) - all really following the advice of my spiritual father.

And I guess I'm a bit angry at God because I thought if I just obeyed my spiritual father, it would all just work out - but my PPD is paralyzing me and making me a bad mother (not 'technically' - I'm doing all the 'work' of motherhood, going through all the motions, but feel completely cut off emotionally from my baby and everyone else, and this is what makes me a bad mother). And I don't understand why God lets PPD 'happen' - what good it can bring? Even if it is all my fault, what has my baby done to deserve such a mother?

Sorry for the rant. I had to do it somewhere. You were just unlucky enough to read it, if you did.

Thank you.

In Christ,
Danica in Serbia.

 
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Offline FrChris

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2007, 05:35:30 PM »
Danica,

Postpartum depression (or peripartum depression) is one of the most frequent 'complications' of birth that affects the mother. It happens all over the world, to women regardless of where they are. There is nothing 'wrong' with you to the point where you should be blaming yourself or feeling that you are a failure; this is just an event that occurs due to the relatively recent changes in your life.

I know you live in the wilderness, but do you have access to a doctor? He or she may be able to help you.

Is there anyone near you that you can talk to? People you can be involved with? Do you feel safe going outside for a walk with the baby?

How much are you resting? Is tiredness also affecting you? Can you rest while your baby rests?

Please try to take comfort in knowing that there are people here who are concerned about you, even though we may not be able to 'drop by' and visit you personally. If nothing else, you are in my prayers, and I pray you will be visited by the comforting hand of our Lord at this time.


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Offline EofK

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2007, 05:48:26 PM »
Hi Danica, and welcome to the forum!  [Edit: Sorry, just realised you've been here a while!  Duh.]

Well, I had a really great post lined up and then hit some mystery key and deleted it.  But it just echoed what Fr. Chris said above:  What you're going through is common with new mothers (I'm one myself) and it does not mean you're doing something wrong or that you're a bad mother.  My best suggestion is to build up a support staff of friends and family who can help you out while you're learning how to live with a newborn.  That's about the only thing that has kept me sane these last two weeks of motherhood.  Feel free to PM me if you need to talk more.  I do sympathize with you; my first week at home with the baby consisted of crying off and on all day until my husband came home, then I'd cry some more.  I still feel overwhelmed, but I'm beginning to feel a little more confident that I'm not going to break my daughter and that I'm not the world's worst mother for not knowing how to do everything.  In any case, you're not alone and you're not a bad mother. 
« Last Edit: November 24, 2007, 05:52:19 PM by EofK »
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Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2007, 05:50:12 PM »
Danica,

Postpartum depression (or peripartum depression) is one of the most frequent 'complications' of birth that affects the mother. It happens all over the world, to women regardless of where they are. There is nothing 'wrong' with you to the point where you should be blaming yourself or feeling that you are a failure; this is just an event that occurs due to the relatively recent changes in your life.

Father, bless. Thank you for this.

I know you live in the wilderness, but do you have access to a doctor? He or she may be able to help you.

No, not really. Too far.

Is there anyone near you that you can talk to? People you can be involved with? Do you feel safe going outside for a walk with the baby?

No, not really. I moved here when we got married and haven't made any real friends. We can't really go out for walks because there are no roads here, so I can't put my daughter in a stroller, and she's too heavy to be carried for more than a few minutes. My husband is away with the car for much of the day, and then in the evenings too.

How much are you resting? Is tiredness also affecting you? Can you rest while your baby rests?

My baby seems to need less sleep than I do  ::)

Please try to take comfort in knowing that there are people here who are concerned about you, even though we may not be able to 'drop by' and visit you personally. If nothing else, you are in my prayers, and I pray you will be visited by the comforting hand of our Lord at this time.

Thank you so much! Your answer helped a lot and your prayers are much appreciated!


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Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

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Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2007, 06:01:14 PM »
Hi Danica, and welcome to the forum!

Well, I had a really great post lined up and then hit some mystery key and deleted it.  But it just echoed what Fr. Chris said above:  What you're going through is common with new mothers (I'm one myself) and it does not mean you're doing something wrong or that you're a bad mother.  My best suggestion is to build up a support staff of friends and family who can help you out while you're learning how to live with a newborn.  That's about the only thing that has kept me sane these last two weeks of motherhood.  Feel free to PM me if you need to talk more.  I do sympathize with you; my first week at home with the baby consisted of crying off and on all day until my husband came home, then I'd cry some more.  I still feel overwhelmed, but I'm beginning to feel a little more confident that I'm not going to break my daughter and that I'm not the world's worst mother for not knowing how to do everything.  In any case, you're not alone and you're not a bad mother. 
Prayers coming your way!

So, good Orthodox women get it too? I'd never met any that did... or they don't talk about it.

My biggest problem is the total absence of social contacts. I'm alone with a non-verbal being most of the time and it's been almost a year now and I don't see it changing until we can move back into the city, where I was born, and where all my friends and family are... in about a year or so?  ;D Hopefully, I'll remain somewhat sane until then.

Thank you and God bless you.
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

Leonard Cohen

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2007, 07:57:10 PM »
Prayers coming your way!

So, good Orthodox women get it too? I'd never met any that did... or they don't talk about it.

My biggest problem is the total absence of social contacts. I'm alone with a non-verbal being most of the time and it's been almost a year now and I don't see it changing until we can move back into the city, where I was born, and where all my friends and family are... in about a year or so?  ;D Hopefully, I'll remain somewhat sane until then.

Thank you and God bless you.

Good Orthodox women do get it, which I found out for sure in retrospect with those who tried to help my ex-wife.  (It's not exactly small talk, and probably would come up only when in necessary conversation).

Don't just let it go, and think it will go away.  My ex-wife just went into denial, spirarled down, refused treatment, returned to her old ways, got involved again in abusive relationships, which is how she ended up being my ex.

If nothing else, given the discription of your situation, stay on line a lot.  Are your family and friends on the net?  Don't stay isolated, that won't help.  And you won't be able, I think, to last the year without decompensation.

I'd see a doctor as soon as you could, to treat any physiological parts of the problem.

I've known plenty of good mothers, including my own, who went throught this.

I'm not a new mother, nor even an old one: I'm the father of a 10 and 9 year olds. But if you want to PM, feel free.
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Offline Trudy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2007, 10:12:17 PM »
Dear Danica:

I am a mother of two grown children, ages 27 and 22.  I had post-partum depression with them both, more so with the first one. 

What I didn't understand, but do now, is that the body goes through a huge hormonal change at the birth of a child, which when you think about it, makes a lot of sense.  The hormones are completely thrown off balance.  It can take a LONG time for them to right themselves.  That may be part of what is going on with you.  Add to that your isolation and that makes it worse. 

I found that taking walks really helped, but I understand that is not possible where you live.  Is it possible to do exercises in your home?  Maybe some stretches, etc?  That will help elevate the endorphins in your brain, and may help alleviate the depression a tiny bit.

Take care of yourself.  Keep praying.  And kiss your baby A LOT!  That helps too!   :)

Athanasia
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Offline Heorhij

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2007, 10:54:47 PM »
Danica, my heart goes out to you and I am praying for you.

My wife did not have a depression after our daughter was born - but then it was in 1984 in the former USSR, where there was, essentially, no concept of depression as such. People were in bad mood every now and then (and pretty much all the time), and nobody paid any serious attention to that...

When we moved to the US, and all three of us - my wife, my daughter, and I, - went through loads of stress, we all were diagnosed with depression at some point and we all took antidepressants. In this regard, I sometimes read Fathers and their thoughts about spiritual despair ("unynie" in Russian) as a passion and a sinful passion at that, and I don't really know what to think. Is it that they were so strong? Or is it that they just did not know as much about the activities of the brain as modern scientists and physicians do? Tough questions to me...

In any case though, you have this neurotic/former anti-depressant user's full support, hugs, and prayers.

G.
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Offline aurelia

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2007, 11:17:58 PM »
(((((((((((((((((hugs)))))))))))))))))))))

I've been there with the isolation and the hopelessness...I was spending the twins' naptimes rocking on the stairs crying before I got any help.  I don't even remember most of thier first year, I was doing the work, but...well, you know. I don't know when they first smiled or said their first word or any of that.  Please feel free to pm me or email me anytime you want to talk, just know you are NOT alone in this. I swear if I were there, I'd come right over.  There is no fault, you are not a bad person or mother. 

Offline Tamara

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2007, 12:51:56 AM »
Trudy is right. Your body hormonal balance may be  off kilter. I went through it too. My first born was very colicky. He cried almost all day long and would wake every 1.5 hours for the first six months to eat. I felt like I was going insane from the lack of sleep and the hormonal imbalance. I compensated by eating too many carbs, tea, and chocolate. But this type of diet only made me feel worse. I would have felt better sooner if I would have eaten a high protein diet, fresh vegetables and fruit and whole grains. Drink lots of water. It will help with fatigue. You may want to find a vitamin supplement for nursing mothers. I also agree with Trudy about the exercise. Try to do some aerobic workouts in the home (running in place, exercise tapes). If possible try to get at least 15 minutes of sunlight every day.
Many of us have been where you are and you have nothing to feel guilty about...motherhood is a type of martyrdom in many respects. Feel free to pm too. You are not alone. God bless you and your little one.

love, Tamara
« Last Edit: November 25, 2007, 12:53:13 AM by Tamara »

Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2007, 09:14:57 AM »
Good Orthodox women do get it, which I found out for sure in retrospect with those who tried to help my ex-wife.  (It's not exactly small talk, and probably would come up only when in necessary conversation).

Don't just let it go, and think it will go away.  My ex-wife just went into denial, spirarled down, refused treatment, returned to her old ways, got involved again in abusive relationships, which is how she ended up being my ex.
I'm sorry to hear that, it can't have been easy. You're in my prayers.
If nothing else, given the discription of your situation, stay on line a lot.  Are your family and friends on the net?  Don't stay isolated, that won't help.  And you won't be able, I think, to last the year without decompensation.My family and friends lead active lives in the real world, but I do spend a lot of time online - used to be on CAF, but you know that story ;D. When my modem tells me I'm now 'connected', that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy  ::)

I'd see a doctor as soon as you could, to treat any physiological parts of the problem.I'd like to, but that doesn't seem likely any time soon.

I've known plenty of good mothers, including my own, who went throught this. And, knowing you as a great, very sane guy, kids turn out just fine? That's wonderful to hear!

I'm not a new mother, nor even an old one: I'm the father of a 10 and 9 year olds. But if you want to PM, feel free.

Thank you so much!
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

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Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2007, 09:17:04 AM »
Dear Danica:

 Is it possible to do exercises in your home?  Maybe some stretches, etc?  That will help elevate the endorphins in your brain, and may help alleviate the depression a tiny bit.

Take care of yourself.  Keep praying.  And kiss your baby A LOT!  That helps too!   :)

Athanasia

Thank you, I'll try to do that. God bless you!
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

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Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2007, 09:29:59 AM »
Danica, my heart goes out to you and I am praying for you.
Thank you so much!
My wife did not have a depression after our daughter was born - but then it was in 1984 in the former USSR, where there was, essentially, no concept of depression as such. People were in bad mood every now and then (and pretty much all the time), and nobody paid any serious attention to that...
I think I know what you mean. I live in transitional, post-Communist Serbia. Going to a psychologist carries its stigma, but everyone 'self-medicates' - popping all sorts of pills and drinking vast amounts of alcohol
When we moved to the US, and all three of us - my wife, my daughter, and I, - went through loads of stress, we all were diagnosed with depression at some point and we all took antidepressants. In this regard, I sometimes read Fathers and their thoughts about spiritual despair ("unynie" in Russian) as a passion and a sinful passion at that, and I don't really know what to think. Is it that they were so strong? Or is it that they just did not know as much about the activities of the brain as modern scientists and physicians do? Tough questions to me...
I think about it too. Most of the time, I think what they're talking about is light years from anything I'm likely to experience - like getting hopeless that all my ceaseless praying, all-night vigils in my cell, my endless fasts etc. will ever help my utter abjectness - yeah, right, like that's what I'm suffering from  ::) ;) And losing hope in the mercy of God is something to warn against. And this thought consoles me - I think that, being so far from that experience, what is our lot as depression, though perhaps made worse by our sinful disposition, may not be blameworthy in itself, but rather a cross to bear. I can live with that thought.
In any case though, you have this neurotic/former anti-depressant user's full support, hugs, and prayers.

G.

Thank you, Heorhij!

Your Slavonic sister,
Danica
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

Leonard Cohen

Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2007, 09:32:20 AM »
(((((((((((((((((hugs)))))))))))))))))))))

I've been there with the isolation and the hopelessness...I was spending the twins' naptimes rocking on the stairs crying before I got any help.  I don't even remember most of thier first year, I was doing the work, but...well, you know. I don't know when they first smiled or said their first word or any of that.  Please feel free to pm me or email me anytime you want to talk, just know you are NOT alone in this. I swear if I were there, I'd come right over.  There is no fault, you are not a bad person or mother. 

Thank you so much, Aurelia! You're welcome to drop by any time! It would probably take about a day's flight, though  ;)
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

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Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2007, 09:35:04 AM »
Trudy is right. Your body hormonal balance may be  off kilter. I went through it too. My first born was very colicky. He cried almost all day long and would wake every 1.5 hours for the first six months to eat. I felt like I was going insane from the lack of sleep and the hormonal imbalance. I compensated by eating too many carbs, tea, and chocolate. But this type of diet only made me feel worse. I would have felt better sooner if I would have eaten a high protein diet, fresh vegetables and fruit and whole grains. Drink lots of water. It will help with fatigue. You may want to find a vitamin supplement for nursing mothers. I also agree with Trudy about the exercise. Try to do some aerobic workouts in the home (running in place, exercise tapes). If possible try to get at least 15 minutes of sunlight every day.
Many of us have been where you are and you have nothing to feel guilty about...motherhood is a type of martyrdom in many respects. Feel free to pm too. You are not alone. God bless you and your little one.

love, Tamara


You are so right about the diet, and the fatigue, and the lack of exercise - thank you for the tips and for the support!
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

Leonard Cohen

Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2007, 09:36:52 AM »
Thank you all so much! you're an incredible bunch of people! You made me feel so much better, so quickly! God bless you all!

In Christ,
Danica
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

Leonard Cohen

Offline Heorhij

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2007, 10:34:23 AM »
You are so very welcome. Just a quick note about exercise. It really, really helps. My wife and I are blessed in that we have a university-based fitness center in ~10 minute drive from our home. When we began to attend it - incidentally, at the same time when I became an Orthodox catechumen, in January 2007 - we both felt so much better not just physically, but also psychologically. It's best when you exercise using a machine that counts how many calories you "burn." If you begin by doing something just 2 times a week and "burning" something like 150-200 calories per session, that already improves your brain chemistry balance. Then you can increase the load to 300, 400, 500 calories, and you will feel even better. It's not just about being slim or muscular, it's most of all about normalizing the synthesis and release of various biologically active molecules in the hypothalamus and in the pituitary gland, and about normalizing the reaction of your body cells (including neurons) to these molecules. --G.
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2007, 11:35:31 AM »
Have you looked at any on line resources on this?  I mean on the medical side: you seem to have a lot of support group activity here (by that I mean actual mothers who can talk first hand of this, and best of all, are Orthodox too :D).

One side note on your reply.  I hope I'm sane (the therapist ordered by the court (part of the custody evaluation process) said so).  I was treated for depression in college, so it happens to a lot of us. (during the divorce the psychiatrist actually refused to treat me, saying that although under a lot of stress, I was not depressed and still sane. So the depression hasn't recurred, despite the opportunity).  My mother's post partum wasn't with me, though.  I was always her favorite.  It was the severe case with my brother, who was somewhat sickly and my mother wanted a daughter (we were three boys, so she wanted a girl, which we got three years later).  He's turned out out more than fine: he's quite established, is happily married now almost 20 years (including the divorce, we only made it 11 years.  Btw, my brother, unlike me, also married young: teenagers, and because they became pregnant. So not exactly the best prospects to start out) and three wonderful children, who also are quite happy (the eldest is going into nursing school).  I didn't know about the post partum over my brother until we were adults: you wouldn't have quessed it while we were growing up. And my brother lives in another state, but still calls our mother regularly.  In other words, if you find an effective way to deal with the present problem, it most likely will just become chalked up to experience.

And to your note on the childern turning out fine: the psychotherapist for my sons has stated that "psychologically" I'm their only parent (mom's too much invovled in her problems to be of much help, though they do love her, as I encourage them to look past her problems), and the pediatrician tells me I'm the one showing them "sane life," without constant strife.  So my past bout of depression evidently hasn't effected them.  (Btw, the bout in part was inherited from the VERY abusive family history on my father's side, which evidently has stopped with us, as he was able to show his good side, despite what a horrible childhood he had, and we were able to not imitate the demons he wrestled with.  So yes, this definitely can be overcome).
« Last Edit: November 25, 2007, 11:46:20 AM by ialmisry »
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Offline EofK

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2007, 04:40:57 PM »
Prayers coming your way!
Thank you, and the same for you!

Quote
So, good Orthodox women get it too? I'd never met any that did... or they don't talk about it.

Yep, unfortunately I think many woman, Orthodox or not, are embarassed to admit they have these feelings.  Thank you for being able to share that in such a public place.  We're here to help!

Quote
My biggest problem is the total absence of social contacts. I'm alone with a non-verbal being most of the time and it's been almost a year now and I don't see it changing until we can move back into the city, where I was born, and where all my friends and family are... in about a year or so?  ;D Hopefully, I'll remain somewhat sane until then.

I understand, that does make things difficult for you.  Well, know that you're welcome to PM me (and the others who have offered) and we'll be happy to lend a shoulder to cry on or have some advice for you. 

God bless you and your family!
Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams

Offline TinaG

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2007, 05:47:21 PM »
There is not one thing sinful or wrong with you for having post-partum depression and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.  This is a real, biological problem.  Maybe I missed someone's post, but I didn't see anyone mention that you really need to talk to your doctor about this.  Postpartum depression is a lot different from the usual "baby blues"  most women get right after birth, and can be a very serious condition.  You need the support of friends, including us on-line friends, but you really should let your doctor know what's going on and make sure this is properly evaluated.  Can you tell us how old your baby is and how long you've had these feelings?   Everyone here has some good suggestions for helping to control the simple baby blues.  Find what works for you, but please talk to your doctor about this.

God bless you and your baby.  I have always found a lot of comfort in the prayers of St. Anna the mother of the Theotokos.  Whenever I've had a problem or worry about motherhood, she is the one I turn to.  I pray for her intercession to help and comfort you.

On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.

Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2007, 06:28:01 PM »
  Can you tell us how old your baby is and how long you've had these feelings?   Everyone here has some good suggestions for helping to control the simple baby blues.  Find what works for you, but please talk to your doctor about this.

My daughter is 10 months old and this really hit when she was about 3-4mo. It got better after I got my first period.

God bless you and your baby.  I have always found a lot of comfort in the prayers of St. Anna the mother of the Theotokos.  Whenever I've had a problem or worry about motherhood, she is the one I turn to.  I pray for her intercession to help and comfort you.

Hey! I love her too! In fact, my daughter's name is Ana!

Thank you so much! God bless!


And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

Leonard Cohen

Offline ialmisry

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2007, 07:51:36 PM »


I would take what you said about when it got better as a definite indication that hormones are at the root of your troubles, and would second TinaG's advice to see a doctor, or get some medical advice.
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline paradoxy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2007, 09:42:19 AM »
OK, admit it. ;D

Who's been praying for me? I've been having inexplicable bouts of sheer singing-dancing-hopping joy against a background of a general great mood ever since I posted here! :)

Anyway, thank you! God bless you all!

In Christ,

Danica
And when He knew for certain
Only drowning men could see Him
He said "All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them"

Leonard Cohen

Offline EofK

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2007, 09:53:16 AM »
OK, admit it. ;D

Who's been praying for me? I've been having inexplicable bouts of sheer singing-dancing-hopping joy against a background of a general great mood ever since I posted here! :)

Anyway, thank you! God bless you all!

In Christ,

Danica

Awesome!   :D  Glad we could be of help!
Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams

Offline TinaG

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2007, 11:32:13 AM »
OK, admit it. ;D

Who's been praying for me? I've been having inexplicable bouts of sheer singing-dancing-hopping joy against a background of a general great mood ever since I posted here! :)

Anyway, thank you! God bless you all!

In Christ,
Danica

Fabulous news.  St. Anna came through for you maybe.  I hope this is a turning point for you but really, please talk with your doctor and keep us posted on how you're doing.  Get out of the house as much as you can, especially into the sunshine.  You don't want to have mid-winter depression on top of this too.  Take care.
On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.

Offline Tamara

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2007, 02:28:18 PM »
OK, admit it. ;D

Who's been praying for me? I've been having inexplicable bouts of sheer singing-dancing-hopping joy against a background of a general great mood ever since I posted here! :)

Anyway, thank you! God bless you all!

In Christ,

Danica

Thank God! I hope He continues to bless you. Keep taking care of yourself because in that way you will be able to do a great service for your sweet little baby.

love, Tamara

Offline Heorhij

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #26 on: November 29, 2007, 04:44:01 PM »
OK, admit it. ;D

Who's been praying for me? I've been having inexplicable bouts of sheer singing-dancing-hopping joy against a background of a general great mood ever since I posted here! :)

Anyway, thank you! God bless you all!

In Christ,

Danica

Wonderful news, Danica, thanks for sharing.
Love never fails.

Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2007, 04:54:20 PM »
Hello Danica,

 After reading your posts, I felt compelled to let you know that I too will be praying for you! :laugh:

 In Christ,

 Gabriel
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Offline Trudy

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Re: Orthodoxy and Post Partum Depression
« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2007, 12:14:08 AM »
OK, admit it. ;D

Who's been praying for me? I've been having inexplicable bouts of sheer singing-dancing-hopping joy against a background of a general great mood ever since I posted here! :)

Anyway, thank you! God bless you all!

In Christ,

Danica

Well, clearly the praying is helping!  Glory to God!  Keep up with the hopping and dancing, etc...get those endorphins going.  I'll bet your 10 month old, Ana, would love to dance with you too....don't you just love the little giggle babies make when having lots of dancing fun.

Thanks be to God!

Many hugs!!!
He has shown you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God?  Micah 6:8