Allah in Arabic

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Christodoulos:
Quote from: Jibrail Almuhajir on November 29, 2007, 04:11:34 PM

Yes; they say "Ya kiddisa Maryam ya walidat'Allah"

In Christ,
Gabriel


Allah hu Akbar -God is great !

Interesting.......

Do you know something about arabian Saints ?

I only know some orthodox Monasteries in Syria and Lebanon like Panhagia Sayadnaya and Ballamand with the wonderworking icon of our Lady of Ballamand the monastery of St. Thekla and I think Hamatoura .....

In CHRIST

GabrieltheCelt:
Quote from: minasoliman on November 26, 2007, 08:53:07 PM

There is no question that the word "Allah" is the Arabic word for God.  We use it in the Church.  But there's speculation as to why Mohammed used the crescent moon as a symbol of Islam, which also connects the origin of the word "Allah" to a Hindu moon goddess.

God bless (Allah yi barik  ;) ).

Here's an article found on About.com:Islam I thought was interesting.  When I was a Muslim, no one seemed to truly know why the cresent was adopted as the symbol.  But one thing is for sure; I enjoy eating croissants in honor of leaving Islam. :D

"The Crescent Moon
From Huda,
Your Guide to Islam.
Is it a symbol of Islam?
The crescent moon and star is an internationally-recognized symbol of the faith of Islam. The symbol is featured on the flags of several Muslim countries, and is even part of the official emblem for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. The Christians have the cross, the Jews have the star of David, and the Muslims have the crescent moon, right?
What is the history behind the crescent moon symbol? What does it symbolize or mean? How and when did it become associated with the faith of Islam? Is it a valid symbol for the faith?

The crescent moon and star symbol actually pre-dates Islam by several thousand years. Information on the origins of the symbol are difficult to ascertain, but most sources agree that these ancient celestial symbols were in use by the peoples of Central Asia and Siberia in their worship of sun, moon, and sky gods.

There are also reports that the crescent moon and star were used to represent the Carthaginian goddess Tanit or the Greek goddess Diana.
The city of Byzantium (later known as Constantinople and Istanbul) adopted the crescent moon as its symbol. According to some reports, they chose it in honor of the goddess Diana. Others indicate that it dates back to a battle in which the Romans defeated the Goths on the first day of a lunar month. In any event, the crescent moon was featured on the city's flag even before the birth of Christ.

The early Muslim community did not really have a symbol. During the time of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), Islamic armies and caravans flew simple solid-colored flags (generally black, green, or white) for identification purposes. In later generations, the Muslim leaders continued to use a simple black, white, or green flag with no markings, writing, or symbolism on it.

It wasn't until the Ottoman Empire that the crescent moon and star became affiliated with the Muslim world. When the Turks conquered Constantinople (Istanbul) in 1453, they adopted the city's existing flag and symbol. Legend holds that the founder of the Ottoman Empire, Osman, had a dream in which the crescent moon stretched from one end of the earth to the other. Taking this as a good omen, he chose to keep the crescent and make it the symbol of his dynasty. There is speculation that the five points on the star represent the five pillars of Islam, but this is pure conjecture. The five points were not standard on the Ottoman flags and it is still not standard on flags used in the Muslim world today.

For hundreds of years, the Ottoman Empire ruled over the Muslim world. After centuries of battle with Christian Europe, it is understandable how the symbols of this empire became linked in people's minds with the faith of Islam as a whole.

Based on this history, many Muslims reject using the crescent moon as a symbol of Islam. The faith of Islam has historically had no symbol, and many refuse to accept what is essentially an ancient pagan icon. It is certainly not in uniform use among Muslims."




GabrieltheCelt:
Quote from: Christodoulos on November 29, 2007, 04:31:55 PM

Allah hu Akbar -God is great !

Interesting.......

Do you know something about arabian Saints ?

I only know some orthodox Monasteries in Syria and Lebanon like Panhagia Sayadnaya and Ballamand with the wonderworking icon of our Lady of Ballamand the monastery of St. Thekla and I think Hamatoura .....

In CHRIST

I don't know of any Arabian saints, if you mean saints from the Arabian pennensula.  If you mean Arabic saints; yes.  St. Isaac the Syrian, St. John of Damascus, St. Symeon the Stylitus(sp?) all come to mind.

ignatius:
Quote from: Jibrail Almuhajir on November 29, 2007, 04:38:58 PM

I don't know of any Arabian saints, if you mean saints from the Arabian pennensula.  If you mean Arabic saints; yes.  St. Isaac the Syrian, St. John of Damascus, St. Symeon the Stylitus(sp?) all come to mind.

St. Isaac the Syrian!!! Pray for us!!!

Wa'salaam!  ;D

Sloga:
Unfortunately, this goes beyong simple misunderstanding, seeing as how Bosniaks say Allah even when they are speaking their Serbo-Croatian-Bosnian (WHATEVER you wanna call it) language. They think Bog is inappropriate for them to say, despite the fact that I have brought up multiple times that Christians in the Middle East say Allah...

BTW, I'm guessing this would mean it wouldnt be innaproproate for a christian to wear the Allah necklace you see muslims wear, but I bet my savings account that they would spark a riot in my school if I decided to wear it.

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