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Author Topic: Name day  (Read 6349 times) Average Rating: 0
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Marina
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« on: November 21, 2007, 08:12:47 AM »

Tell me please, what should I say to the person who has a name day (or name-day?) today?
Thank you in advance!
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2007, 08:16:48 AM »

You could wish them: "Many Years!"
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Marina
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2007, 08:22:13 AM »

You could wish them: "Many Years!"

So may I say: "I wish you on that special day (on your name-day?) many years!"? Is it correct?
Or how can I say it another way so the person could understand that I want to congratulate him on this happy day?
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2007, 08:49:34 AM »

I just walk up to the person and say Many Years. Note: On the old calendar today is the synxis of Michael and Gabriel.  So you go up to your Orthodox friend named Mike or Gabrielle and you say, "Many Years".  Say to a non-Orhtodox friend and they may look at you like you have two heads.  Grin
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2007, 09:00:04 AM »

Or how can I say it another way so the person could understand that I want to congratulate him on this happy day?
You would say:
"Many Years to you on your Name Day!"
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2007, 10:36:00 AM »

Marina,

If this person is Russian, say "Mnogaya Leta!"

(In my native Ukrainian, it's "Mnohaya Lita." BTW, note that according to the pre-1917 Russian spelling rules, the "e" in "leta" was literated by a special letter "yat'," signifying that in Old Church Slavonic this sound was not quite "e").
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2007, 05:00:20 PM »

So does yat always become i in modern Ukrainian?

In Polish it is las rather than лес , biały rather then белый etc. 
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2007, 05:20:12 PM »

Nektarios, I am not sure if it's "always," but I can say that it's "i" in many cases. The Russian "les" in Ukrainian is, indeed, "lis" (forest), and "belyj" is, indeed, "bilyj" (white); "sneg" is "snih" (snow), "belka" is "bilka" (squirrel), "nezhnyj" is "nizhnyj" (tender), etc.
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2007, 06:15:58 PM »

Tell me please, what should I say to the person who has a name day (or name-day?) today?
Thank you in advance!

You can also wish them a happy feast day.
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ozgeorge
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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2007, 09:02:19 PM »

If this person is Russian, say "Mnogaya Leta!"
Why would she want to know that if she asked in the "Practice English" forum? Cheesy
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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2007, 10:26:24 PM »

Why would she want to know that if she asked in the "Practice English" forum? Cheesy

You are right, sorry, my bad. Smiley
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« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2007, 03:23:37 AM »

Thank you very much for your answers!
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« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2007, 05:25:56 AM »

Why would she want to know that if she asked in the "Practice English" forum? Cheesy

I think it shows that while English is the international language and influencing many languages, it is also being changed by its contact with other languages.  And this is especially true of Orthodox vocabulary and customary greetings since it is so new to the anglophone world.  For my recently celebrated name day I received wishes of "Happy name day", "Many years" "Chronia Polla" and "mnogaya leta" - oddly enough the last two tended to come from native English speakers and the former two from non-native English speakers.  In that sense I think Pan Heorhij answered the question best by demonstrating that in Anglophone culture the concept of name days is very underdeveloped and is still borrowing rather than generating a "native" response. 
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