OrthodoxChristianity.net
December 20, 2014, 08:37:11 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Accents and English as a Second Language.  (Read 2210 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Cyrillic
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,037


Cyrillico est imperare orbi universo


« on: July 28, 2014, 07:54:09 PM »

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or a French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 08:01:32 PM by Cyrillic » Logged

"Claret is the liquor for boys; port for men; but he who aspires to be a hero must drink brandy."
-Dr. Samuel Johnson
augustin717
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: The other ROC
Posts: 5,636



« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2014, 07:59:33 PM »

you can't rely get rid of it . Not do I care to either. Americans though almost never guess it so I'm usually mistaken for being Polish, Russian , Ukrainian , Armenian, Albanuan or even very rarely , French.
Logged
augustin717
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: The other ROC
Posts: 5,636



« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2014, 08:02:44 PM »

But Durch phonetics are closer to English phonetics than Romanian, so less of a problem to begin with .
Logged
Arachne
Trinary Unit || Resident Bossy Boots
Section Moderator
Protokentarchos
*****
Online Online

Faith: Greek *and* Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Archdiocese of the British Isles and Ireland
Posts: 4,813


Happy Holidays!


« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2014, 08:05:24 PM »

You can't. Not without elocution training, the kind that actors get, and even then, you're likely to revert to your familiar speech patterns as soon as your focus slips. In fact, even if you live in an anglophone country, you can't do it consciously. It's one of the things that just creeps on you unawares, over long periods of total immersion.

When I came to the UK I had more than a bit of an accent; far from the stereotypical 'Hollywood Greek', but noticeable. I kept being asked where I was from every time I opened my mouth, although nobody seemed to have trouble understanding me. Seven years later, I still get the question occasionally, but I have adapted to the local speech pattern (more cadences than actual pronunciation) and blend in better.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 08:06:22 PM by Arachne » Logged

'When you live your path all the time, you end up with both more path and more time.'~Venecia Rauls

Blog ~ Bookshelf ~ Jukebox
LBK
No Reporting Allowed
Warned
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 11,625


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us!


« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2014, 08:05:33 PM »

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or an French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?

Even within the English-speaking world, there are a multitude of accents. Listening to radio broadcasts chould help, but even the BBC now features many different accents. You'll also need to choose which accent you would like to "retrain" into, and you need to have a good enough ear to distinguish between your own accent and that which you wish to adopt. Dutch, Slavic, Scottish and Irish accents are among the most resistant to complete eradication.  Wink
Logged
Yurysprudentsiya
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA, although in my heart I will always remain a loving son of the UOC-USA
Posts: 2,383


God, the Great, the Only, Keep for Us Our Ukraine!


« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2014, 08:06:45 PM »

What is your native tongue?
Logged
Nephi
Monster Tamer
Section Moderator
Protokentarchos
*****
Online Online

Faith: Non-Chalcedonian Byzantine
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch
Posts: 4,732



« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2014, 08:12:56 PM »

you can't rely get rid of it . Not do I care to either.

Romanian accents are usually nice in my experience anyway.
Logged
Cyrillic
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,037


Cyrillico est imperare orbi universo


« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2014, 08:17:11 PM »

You can't. Not without elocution training, the kind that actors get, and even then, you're likely to revert to your familiar speech patterns as soon as your focus slips. In fact, even if you live in an anglophone country, you can't do it consciously. It's one of the things that just creeps on you unawares, over long periods of total immersion.

When I came to the UK I had more than a bit of an accent; far from the stereotypical 'Hollywood Greek', but noticeable. I kept being asked where I was from every time I opened my mouth, although nobody seemed to have trouble understanding me. Seven years later, I still get the question occasionally, but I have adapted to the local speech pattern (more cadences than actual pronunciation) and blend in better.

That isn't too encouraging. In your daily life do you still speak with an accent or is it something you only do accidentally? And have you actively tried to learn a local British accent or the received pronounciation?

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or an French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?

Even within the English-speaking world, there are a multitude of accents. Listening to radio broadcasts chould help, but even the BBC now features many different accents. You'll also need to choose which accent you would like to "retrain" into, and you need to have a good enough ear to distinguish between your own accent and that which you wish to adopt. Dutch, Slavic, Scottish and Irish accents are among the most resistant to complete eradication.  Wink

I'll try that, but I haven't noticed that watching English movies or documentaries changed my pronounciation. It might be because accents differ per actor.

What is your native tongue?

A silly German dialect called Dutch.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 08:17:36 PM by Cyrillic » Logged

"Claret is the liquor for boys; port for men; but he who aspires to be a hero must drink brandy."
-Dr. Samuel Johnson
TheTrisagion
Armed Feline rider of Flaming Unicorns
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 9,937



« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2014, 08:28:02 PM »

When I was in the Netherlands years ago, I was very surprised at how many people could speak English with an American accent so well perfected that I thought they were American tourists until I asked where they were from.  I met several people that were that way.  I have no idea how they did it, I would have thought they would have some sort of a British accent. One of them thanked me for the opportunity to practice her English.

In many places in the US, if someone doesn't speak English, they usually get the response "If you are going to come to this country, learn to speak our language". I was thankful that the Dutch did not have that attitude.
Logged

Why can't you just take your spiritual edification like a man? 
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2014, 08:30:57 PM »

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or a French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?

I used to teach ESL. One of the first things I did was to teach proper vowel and consonant placement and production. No matter how much practice you have in English, unless you are pronouncing your vowels and consonants correctly, you can never approximate the American English or British English accent.

Funny, too, British English has more accents than that found in the USA.
Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
augustin717
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: The other ROC
Posts: 5,636



« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2014, 08:31:55 PM »

^thats maybe bc you weren't mistaken from an immigrant from across the border in Suriname.
Logged
Arachne
Trinary Unit || Resident Bossy Boots
Section Moderator
Protokentarchos
*****
Online Online

Faith: Greek *and* Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Archdiocese of the British Isles and Ireland
Posts: 4,813


Happy Holidays!


« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2014, 08:33:07 PM »

That isn't too encouraging. In your daily life do you still speak with an accent or is it something you only do accidentally? And have you actively tried to learn a local British accent or the received pronounciation?

I'm aware that I have an accent. Not sure if others don't mention it as much because they don't notice it at all or because it's not enough to be interesting or annoying. I tend to give myself away when I deal with foreign words which the English language mangles (Greek, of course, which in English are consistently mis-accented, but others as well - I just can't say things like 'sabotoor' for saboteur, not even for the sake of blending in). I've never tried to put on a British accent, not even RP, at least not for more than a couple of minutes; I can do a decent Scots, for entertainment purposes, but Welsh still eludes me. If we lived in Yorkshire, where my in-laws come from, I'd make an effort to sound like them, as I love North Country speech. As it is, I'm just letting time make me a naturalised resident of East Anglia. It's not an interesting enough variant to deserve more work. Tongue
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 08:34:30 PM by Arachne » Logged

'When you live your path all the time, you end up with both more path and more time.'~Venecia Rauls

Blog ~ Bookshelf ~ Jukebox
augustin717
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: The other ROC
Posts: 5,636



« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2014, 08:46:47 PM »

you can't rely get rid of it . Not do I care to either.

Romanian accents are usually nice in my experience anyway.
I'm glad I live in a place where at least sone foreign accents are fetishized . Makes work easier

Logged
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2014, 08:47:32 PM »

Two sounds in the English language (American) are merging, so in California you will hear the words cot (something you sleep on) and caught pronounced exactly the same, whereas in New York, you will hear the two words pronounced differently.



In American English (Eastern seaboard)

cot = the back mid-open vowel (^ or stressed schwa)

caught = the back open vowel

In California, the ^ (stressed schwa) sound is used to pronounce the vowel
in cot and in caught.

In RP British English, the placement would be the same,
but those two vowels would be pronounced with rounded lips.

So, if I wish to fake an RP accent, all I must do is pronounce the mid-back and back vowels with rounded lips, and voila, people will ask me if I am from the UK.  laugh

One gal from England even asked where I had lived in England. My husband laughed. I was born in Georgia.


p.s. I do not have the IPA overlay on this keyboard, so I have used the ^ or SCHWA to represent the mid-open back sound.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 08:54:07 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2014, 09:01:33 PM »

If you can take a course in linguistics even in Dutch, where the IPA is taught, and the course covers phonetics using the IPA chart for both vowels and consonants, you can learn much about different languages. We studied all the languages of the world in learning the different vowel sounds. It was fascinating, especially Turkish.

One of my linguistics professors came from the Netherlands and her Dutch accent was barely noticeable, although she noticed it. The Dutch have great universities teaching linguistics. Check them out.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 09:04:52 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Georgii
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR, German Diocese
Posts: 344


Holy Martyr Afra, pray to God for us!


« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2014, 09:12:01 PM »

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or a French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?

In the old days you would listen to a lot of cassette tapes. "Listen and repeat". Record yourself and compare yourself to the model. If you have a halfway decent ear you can reach some kind of level that way.
Nowadays there is a lot of offline and online software for that, but I don´t have any experience with it.

I´ve lived in Southern Germany for almost all of the last 24 years, and I still have a slight American accent. But I only started learning German at age 26, and most days I speak more English and Russian than German.

My accent does depend on how tired or distracted I am, but what typically happens is that when I have a casual conversation with a German speaker, after two or three minutes they will ask me, in approximate order of frequency 1) if I am from the Netherlands, 2) whether I am British or American, or 3) what country I am from.

It could be that with people from Northern Germany my generic Southern German pronunciation and diction would mask the American accent, especially if I played up being Bavarian or Swabian, but I´ve never tried that.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 09:23:21 PM by Georgii » Logged

my garment accuses me, for it is not a wedding garment
Georgii
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR, German Diocese
Posts: 344


Holy Martyr Afra, pray to God for us!


« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2014, 09:19:27 PM »

That isn't too encouraging. In your daily life do you still speak with an accent or is it something you only do accidentally? And have you actively tried to learn a local British accent or the received pronounciation?

I'm aware that I have an accent. Not sure if others don't mention it as much because they don't notice it at all or because it's not enough to be interesting or annoying.

Sometimes I can hear my own accent, sometimes not. I´d like to think that not hearing it comes temporarily after I reach a new level of relatively non-accented speech.

It´s like my sins - I´d like to know about them and repent, whether they are interesting or annoying enough or not :-)
Logged

my garment accuses me, for it is not a wedding garment
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2014, 09:20:11 PM »

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or a French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?

In the old days you would listen to a lot of cassette tapes. "Listen and repeat". Record yourself and compare yourself to the model. If you have a halfway decent ear you can reach some kind of level that way.
Nowadays there is a lot of offline and online software for that, but I don´t have any experience with it.

I´ve lived in Southern Germany for almost all of the last 24 years, and I still have a slight American accent. But I only started learning German at age 26, and most days I speak more English and Russian than German.

My accent does depend on how tired or distracted I am, but what typically happens is that when I have a casual conversation with a German speaker, after two or three minutes they will ask me, in approximate order of frequency 1) if I am from the Netherlands, 2) whether I am British or American, or 3) what country I am from.

It could be that with people from Northern Germany my generic Southern German pronunciation and diction would mask the American accent, especially if I played it up, but I´ve never tried that.



My brother has lived in Southwestern Germany now for about 30 years. His accent sounds like a southern US accent, and I barely recognized his speech. It has changed. His wife speaks the southern (or low) German.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 09:21:51 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Georgii
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR, German Diocese
Posts: 344


Holy Martyr Afra, pray to God for us!


« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2014, 09:27:32 PM »


cot = the back mid-open vowel (^ or stressed schwa)

caught = the back open vowel

In California, the ^ (stressed schwa) sound is used to pronounce the vowel
in cot and in caught.

You must have heard the classic that goes something like "The criminal was caught and went to jail, where he slept on a cot. Then he had to appear in court."

Edit: I grew up in Boston, Mass, where "caught" and "court" can have diphthongs.

Pub for linguists: The Gloʔttal Stop
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 09:31:56 PM by Georgii » Logged

my garment accuses me, for it is not a wedding garment
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2014, 09:29:47 PM »


cot = the back mid-open vowel (^ or stressed schwa)

caught = the back open vowel

In California, the ^ (stressed schwa) sound is used to pronounce the vowel
in cot and in caught.

You must have heard the classic that goes something like "The criminal was caught and went to jail, where he slept on a cot. Then he had to appear in court."

No I have not heard of that one, but others.
Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #20 on: July 28, 2014, 09:32:36 PM »

There are many poems about English Pronunciation. I know of three lengthy ones.

Here is one on the internet:

Quote
Dearest creature in creation,
Study English pronunciation.
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.

For the complete poem, please go to http://pauillac.inria.fr/~xleroy/stuff/english-pronunciation.html
Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
xOrthodox4Christx
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Protestant (Inquirer)
Jurisdiction: Orthodox Christianity
Posts: 3,636



« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2014, 09:36:20 PM »

Never having carried on a conversation in English for longer than two or three minutes, I speak with a huge accent. It isn't a sexy one either, like a Spanish or a French accent. So, how do you learn a proper English accent without having to live in an Anglophone country for years?

Practice generating the sounds. That's how I got my Arabic accent. Also, listen to how other people speak and try mimicking their idiolect.

You cannot really 'get rid' of an accent as much as you can 'clear it up'.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 09:38:00 PM by xOrthodox4Christx » Logged

"Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living beings, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on earth.... While there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element, I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free." (Eugene Debs)
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2014, 09:37:57 PM »

Here is my most beloved poem:

Quote
I take it you already know
Of tough and bough and cough and dough.
Others may stumble but not you,
On hiccough, through, laugh and through.
Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
To learn of less familiar traps.

Beware of heard, a dreadful word
That looks like beard and sounds like bird,
And dead--it's said like bed, not bead.
For goodness's sake, don't call it deed!
Watch out for meat and great and threat:
They rhyme with suite and straight and debt.

A moth is not a moth in mother,
Nor both in bother, broth in brother,
And here is not a match for there,
Nor dear and fear for bear and pear,
And then there's dose and rose and lose--
Just look them up--and goose and choose,
And cork and work and card and ward,
And font and front and word and sword,
And do and go and thwart and cart.
Come, come, I've hardly made a start.

A dreadful language? Man alive,
I'd mastered it when I was five.

This poem is attributed to T. S. Watt (1954).
But other sources say it is anonymous. Who knows?
Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2014, 09:41:04 PM »

And here is another, but there is at least one more out there.

I shall let someone else search for it.

Quote
Here is some pronunciation.
Ration never rhymes with nation,
Say prefer, but preferable,
Comfortable and vegetable.
B must not be heard in doubt,
Debt and dumb both leave it out.

To view the complete poem, please visit: http://oud.digischool.nl/en/poetry/poems/pronunciation.htm
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 09:41:26 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2014, 10:03:58 PM »

Here is a quiz to test your understanding of Math and English:

« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 10:04:28 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
genesisone
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antioch
Posts: 2,539



« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2014, 08:31:40 AM »

An accent that makes the speaker sound foreign is more than just the reproduction of vowels and consonants. It's also about rhythm and intonation in sentence patterns. Have you ever noticed that even if you can't make out any words (i.e. because they are scarcely audible) you can usually tell that someone is speaking in another language? It's because you are picking up on that difference in the overall flow of the language. This is often the most difficult part of language learning. It is relatively easy to teach someone how to make a single vowel/consonant sound, but much more difficult - if not impossible - to instruct someone in the more complex lengthy patterns of the language without a lot of exposure to the target language. These patterns are often a key feature in identifying dialects within a language as well.

It has also been my observation that English speakers from the UK (or wherever) tend to keep an identifiable accent longer than someone who has learned English as a second language (who may have an accent, but is less easily identifiable). Purely anecdotal, I don't have any scientific studies to back that up.

It is also often easier to understand an ESL speaker than one whose dialectal accent differs significantly from one's own.
Logged
LBK
No Reporting Allowed
Warned
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 11,625


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us!


« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2014, 08:44:53 AM »

Quote
It has also been my observation that English speakers from the UK (or wherever) tend to keep an identifiable accent longer than someone who has learned English as a second language (who may have an accent, but is less easily identifiable). Purely anecdotal, I don't have any scientific studies to back that up.

This is not at all my experience. ESL speakers tend to retain their non-native accents for life with little tempering. Native English speakers who emigrate to places or nations where a different English accent predominates might, with time, more closely conform their own accent to the new one, but it depends on the relative "strengths" of the respective accents. As I mentioned before, Irish and Scots accents are resistant to change, as are many of the northern English accents like those from Yorkshire and Lancashire. "Lighter" accents are more malleable.

Logged
Alpo
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Jerkodox
Posts: 7,043



« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2014, 09:00:03 AM »

I hate Finnish accent but I have realized over the years that if I pay attention to my accent instead of actual speaking I'll never learn to speak fluently. It's better to speak with horrible accent than not to speak at all. I believe Britons and Americans are used to silly accents anyway.
Logged

TheTrisagion
Armed Feline rider of Flaming Unicorns
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 9,937



« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2014, 09:05:33 AM »

I'm always impressed with someone who speaks English with a foreign accent because it means they know at least one more language than what I do.
Logged

Why can't you just take your spiritual edification like a man? 
Fabio Leite
Warned
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek
Posts: 3,511


Future belongs to God only.


WWW
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2014, 10:36:10 AM »

You need professional help for that. It is perfectly feasible for most people, but to acquire a native accent for an adult requires a lot of effort.

I've know of only two kind of people who go for that: people who are in love with the language and intelligence agents (seriously), who have to be taken for natives.

For most social situations a strong accent will be derogatory and may even compromise communication, but a light accent will be acceptable and even admired.

One must pay attention to at least make differences that are meaningful. For example, Brazilians tend to say "th" as "d", "t" or "f" (I wantch two buy datch ladder coatch. Free tousandji for datch? Very expensive!) This can lead to not being understood, prejudice, and in negotiations or job interviews to loose opportunities. Some accent is charming. Too much is a problem.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2014, 10:38:45 AM by Fabio Leite » Logged

Multiple Energies, Three Persons, Two Natures, One God.
Punch
Warned
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Body of Christ
Posts: 5,801



« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2014, 10:47:55 AM »

I, too, have noticed that the English tend to keep their accent in the Unitied States.  I think it has to do with there being really no need to change the way they speak.  Most of us can understand them quite well.  I tend to understand nearly anyone from the UK more easily than someone from Na Yawk, Bwostn, or Nawlins.
Logged

I would be happy to agree with you, but then both of us would be wrong.
Maria
Orthodox Christian
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,448


O most Holy Theotokos, save us.


« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2014, 07:15:47 PM »

I, too, have noticed that the English tend to keep their accent in the Unitied States.  I think it has to do with there being really no need to change the way they speak.  Most of us can understand them quite well.  I tend to understand nearly anyone from the UK more easily than someone from Na Yawk, Bwostn, or Nawlins.

The people at Martha's Vineyard speak a form of English from England that has not changed much.
Actually speakers of British English fit in nicely.  You can only spot them when they use clothing words such as bonnet and boot to describe car parts. Didn't we have a thread about the differences between American English and British English once upon a time?
« Last Edit: July 29, 2014, 07:16:57 PM by Maria » Logged

Glory to Jesus Christ!
Glory to Him forever!
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.118 seconds with 61 queries.