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Author Topic: Looking for orthodox English native speaker penpal  (Read 9777 times) Average Rating: 0
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msmirnov
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« on: November 12, 2007, 04:44:23 AM »

Hello!

My name is Mikhail (a Russian analogue of Michael). I'm 28. I'm Russian and I live in Saint-Petersburg.

Recently I got a new job as a system administrator in the Sevice Desk of Finnish-Swedish company. Therefore I have to upgrade my English. I'm learning English by myself with a help of my wife (she is an English teacher), but sometimes I meet with some difficulties. And neither my wife nor her Russian teachers of English can help me. So I decided to correspond with an English native speaker. I think that if he'll be so kind to help me with my difficulties, I'll help him back learn Russian or learn more about Russian culture.

My wife and I are orthodox believers (Moscow Patriarchy) and I think that the best penpal for me is an orthodox guy or girl, because I hope we'll have many things in common to discuss.

So if  you are interested mail to  email removed per poster's request  -PtA

God save you!

Mikhail Smirnov

PS Excuse me for off topic.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 04:54:22 AM by PeterTheAleut » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2007, 05:19:42 AM »

Mikhail,

slava Iesu Christu!!!

There are plenty of IT people on this forum. They should be able to help you. Please write to me as well if you have problems. God bless.
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2007, 09:12:56 AM »

Hello!

My name is Mikhail (a Russian analogue of Michael). I'm 28. I'm Russian and I live in Saint-Petersburg.

Recently I got a new job as a system administrator in the Sevice Desk of Finnish-Swedish company. Therefore I have to upgrade my English. I'm learning English by myself with a help of my wife (she is an English teacher), but sometimes I meet with some difficulties. And neither my wife nor her Russian teachers of English can help me. So I decided to correspond with an English native speaker. I think that if he'll be so kind to help me with my difficulties, I'll help him back learn Russian or learn more about Russian culture.

My wife and I are orthodox believers (Moscow Patriarchy) and I think that the best penpal for me is an orthodox guy or girl, because I hope we'll have many things in common to discuss.

So if  you are interested mail to  m.smirnov {@@@} mail.ru

God save you!

Mikhail Smirnov

PS Excuse me for off topic.

This is not off topic.  Welcome to OC.net!  I hope you get a good response to your request: as collin_nunis mentioned, we do have many IT people here.

Also, feel free to use this new forum, "Practice English," to practice using the English language; I have a feeling many folks will keep an eye on the postings here, in order to help our brethren learn the language.

Welcome again, and I hope the Lord blesses you!

Cleveland, Global Moderator.
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2007, 09:22:16 AM »

As to your post: you're doing a wonderful job with English already!  I thought I would point out a few things that I noticed, so you may work on them.

I think that if he'll be so kind to help me with my difficulties, I'll help him back learn Russian or learn more about Russian culture.

You may want to finish the sentence with "I will help him learn Russian or learn more about Russian culture in return," or the alternative "I can return the favor by helping him learn Russian or learn more about Russian culture."

My wife and I are orthodox believers (Moscow Patriarchy) and I think that the best penpal for me is an orthodox guy or girl, because I hope we'll have many things in common to discuss.

I don't use the phrase too often, but I think the correct usage is "pen pal" (with a space in between) - they are a friend (or "pal," which is a term of endearment for a close friend) via the pen.

PS Excuse me for off topic.

You should probably add a verb to this sentence.  When posting on the internet, we often take many liberties (which is perfectly fine) with sentence construction.  But this is the "learn English" forum, so I thought I would point this out.

A few examples of how you could get your thought across are:
"Excuse me for being off topic," or "Excuse me for posting off topic."
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2007, 11:05:03 AM »

First, welcome, msmirnov, to OC.net. The English in your post was very good. Only a few minor problems, most of which Cleveland pointed out. One very small thing:

In English, we capitalize the word "Orthodox" when we are using it in any capacity related to the Orthodox Christian Faith itself (or to Orthodox Judaism). We do not capitalize it when we are using it as a generic adjective or noun. Here's an example:

I am an Orthodox Christian.

As an ardent believer in the power of the free market, he would never question the orthodoxy of Adam Smith.

You should probably add a verb to this sentence.

*Grammar nerd to the rescue!*

He did have a verb in his original sentence -- a verb in the imperative mood with an object (i.e. "Excuse me").

"Excuse me for being off topic," or "Excuse me for posting off topic."

"Being" and "posting" tain't verbs, at least not in this usage.

Of course, this raises a very difficult area of English grammar and syntax: the participle and the gerund. Very hard for anyone, even native speakers, to understand, especially because English uses forms of the participle in compound verbs.
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« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2007, 11:49:18 AM »

Hiya Mikhail, welcome to OC.net!

Your English is wonderful already, but I do understand your desire to have a native English speaker as a pen pal.

I live in the US, but my English is not my native (or "first") language. My two "equally first" languages are Ukrainian and Russian. I was born in Kyiv (or "Kiev") in 1957 and came to the US as a postdoc in 1990.

I am sure you will find someone here to be your pen pal. Maybe Nektarios or Young Fogey - they both are native English speakers, but they are exceptionally fluent in Russian.

In any case, may the Lord bless your path!

George (Heorhij/Georgiy)
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« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2007, 02:36:18 PM »

My name is Mikhail (a Russian analogue of Michael). I'm 28. I'm Russian and I live in Saint-Petersburg.

Меня зовут Дерек, и я живу в США в штате Аризона.  Я люблю ваш город, он очень красивый.  Я был в России три месяца прошлом летом (и в Питербурге и в Москве).  Я студент русского языка и литературы.  Когда я был в Петербурге, я учился в смолном институте и жил на вассилевском острове.     

Quote
I'm learning English by myself with a help of my wife (she is an English teacher)

In this case it would be better to say, "with the help of my wife".  "A" is rarely used with "help" in English.  There are a few idioms "a helping hand" or if it is an adjective "a helpful man" but almost never when "help" is a noun.

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My wife and I are orthodox believers (Moscow Patriarchy) and I think that the best penpal for me is an orthodox guy or girl, because I hope we'll have many things in common to discuss.

Я американец и поляк (мой дедушка и моя бабушка из Польши), но я православный.  Многие русские говорят, что не может быть.  Ну, это правда.  Я не знаю много слоб о церкови, но еслиб вы хтели поговорить (если у вас есть Skype) или паписать здесь с мной, я был бы рад.       

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God save you!

In English it is more common and natural sounding to say "God bless".
« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 02:37:19 PM by Νεκτάριος » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2007, 04:12:30 PM »

I'm very impressed by your response! I wanted to have one pen pal, but I've got lot more! And even special forum was created...

Thank you, my friends, for your improvement of my English, I really need it.

It seems to me that "Excuse me for posting off topic" sounds more classic than my original sentence. I think that my main goal now is to learn classic English. But knowledge of informal English is useful too. As for this sentence, I suppose that "Russian habit" made me wrote this way. In spoken Russian we rather often omit some words, which are obvious from the context.

I will gladly use this forum for solving my questions! And certainly if anyone has any questions about Russia or Russian or any other - please, ask me without any doubt!

Heorhij, we are almost countrymen! (Is it a right word for the term "земляки"?) Anyway we were born in one country - USSR Smiley I was born in Kazakhstan in Alma-Ata and I had lived there till I entered an institute in Moscow. After graduating from the institute I married a girl from Petersburg. So I have been living here only for about five years, but I like this city very much. Much more than Moscow Smiley

slava Iesu Christu!!!
It's a pleasant surprise for me that the guy from Malaysia knows a Russian phrase! Let me correct you a little: it's right to say "Slava Iisusu Hristu!" (using transliteration), but this phrase is rarely used. A very common collocation is: "Slava Bogu!" (God be praised).

Derek, your Russian is very good! I'm not sure, but I suppose that Russian is rather difficult language for English speaking learners. So you are getting on well!

And I'm really surprised to know that you are half Pole and you are an Orthodox! And you even learn Russian and Russian literature! Unfortunatly, there is some tension between our nations that arised during the history Sad And I'm very happy that you don't pay attention to this situation! This is a sign of a true Christian!

I live on Vasilievsky Island too, on Nalichnaya street Smiley Do you remember where you lived exactly?

I offer you to write in Russian and I'll write in English. So we could correct each other. Or may be you would like another way? I'm ready to discuss with you any theme you want. And it is certanly very interesting for me why you are an Orthodox and why you are learning Russian (if you find this suitable to tell me). To what patriarchy do you belong? Does your parish use English for liturgy?

если у вас есть Skype
Skype is restricted at my work and at home I have no time to chat online, because I have to be with my little son.

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я живу в США в штате Аризона
It is much warmer in Arizona than in Petersburg Smiley This is the only thing that really upsets me, because I was born and grew up in the south, in Kazakhstan.

There are some little mistakes in you post, I'll correct them if you allow me.

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прошлом летом
прошлым летом - instrumental case (Творительный падеж)

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Я студент русского языка и литературы
It is more right to say "Я студент, изучаю русский язык и литературу"

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в смолном институте
I think that this is a name (название), so you should capitalize the first letter: "в Cмольном институте"

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на вассилевском острове
It's a difficult word even for many Russians: "на Васильевском острове" (and it's also a name)

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говорят, что не может быть.
You should insert a pronoun: "что этого не может быть". In some cases it is possible to omit pronoun as you know, but I think that constraction like "не может быть" is mostly used in direct speach. And when you convert it into indirect speach, you should insert pronoun.
Little example:
 - Тебе повысили зарплату!
 - Неправда! Не может быть! (impling: Это неправда! Этого не может быть!)
Я сказал, что ему повысили зарплату, но он не поверил мне. Сказал, что это неправда и что
этого не может быть.

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Ну, это правда
I think you wanted to say "Но это правда".

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о церкови
Right: "о церкви". Беглая гласная. I don't know how it is called in English Sad Maybe "vanishing vowel".

Quote
но еслиб вы хтели поговорить
It is more correct to say: "но если вы хотите, мы можем поговорить"
Please, feel free to call me "на ты".

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или паписать здесь
"или попереписываться здесь" sounds better.

Quote
с мной
о мной" - because the first letter of the second word is a consonant.

But hmm... You didn't ask me to correct you. Maybe I shoudn't? I hope you don't consider me as a bore, otherwise please excuse me.
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« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2007, 11:41:36 PM »

I'm very impressed by your response! I wanted to have one pen pal, but I've got lot more! And even special forum was created...

And even a special forum was created.

Quote
(Is it a right word for the term "земляки"?)

Yes, countrymen is the right translation.

Quote
I was born in Kazakhstan in Alma-Ata and I had lived there till I entered an institute in Moscow. After graduating from the institute I married a girl from Petersburg. So I have been living here only for about five years, but I like this city very much. Much more than Moscow Smiley

Как интересно!  Я буду в централной Азии следующий год.  Я буду учиться в Бишкеке, и напишу диссертацию о русском языке в Киргизии.   

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Derek, your Russian is very good! I'm not sure, but I suppose that Russian is rather difficult language for English speaking learners. So you are getting on well!

Спасибо большое!  Мне русский язык очень трудно.   

Quote
And I'm really surprised to know that you are half Pole and you are an Orthodox! And you even learn Russian and Russian literature! Unfortunatly, there is some tension between our nations that arised during the history Sad And I'm very happy that you don't pay attention to this situation!

Это история.  Слава Богу, мы живы сегондя.       

Quote
I live on Vasilievsky Island too, on Nalichnaya street Smiley Do you remember where you lived exactly?

Наличная улица...около станции метро Приморская?  Я жил на Капитанской улице.  По-английскии мы сказали бы "It's a small world."

Quote
I offer you to write in Russian and I'll write in English. So we could correct each other. Or may be you would like another way? I'm ready to discuss with you any theme you want. And it is certanly very interesting for me why you are an Orthodox and why you are learning Russian (if you find this suitable to tell me). To what patriarchy do you belong? Does your parish use English for liturgy?

Я напишу.  Но у меня нет времене, и я не пишу быстро по-русскии.

One minor correction: the more common usage would be patriarchate rather than patriarchy.  It is funny that you wrote, "To what patriarchy do you belong?" as the grammar is 100% correct.  But, most people would say in conversation, "What patriarchate do you belong to?"  This is technically incorrect, but is used very often in spoken English now.

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It is much warmer in Arizona than in Petersburg Smiley This is the only thing that really upsets me, because I was born and grew up in the south, in Kazakhstan.

Сегодня 30 градов здесь!  И летом может быть 50 градов.  Летом сколько градов в Казахстане?   

Я надеюсь что ты не посмотрел фильм Борат!   Wink

Quote
But hmm... You didn't ask me to correct you. Maybe I shoudn't? I hope you don't consider me as a bore, otherwise please excuse me.

Thank you very much!  I appreciate the help. 
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« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2007, 12:30:38 PM »

He did have a verb in his original sentence -- a verb in the imperative mood with an object (i.e. "Excuse me").

"Being" and "posting" tain't verbs, at least not in this usage.

Of course, this raises a very difficult area of English grammar and syntax: the participle and the gerund. Very hard for anyone, even native speakers, to understand, especially because English uses forms of the participle in compound verbs. 

Very true.  Forgive my zeal, which made me forget my Greek and Latin grammar lessons (which were invaluable tools for learning correct English grammar).
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« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2007, 09:15:32 AM »

Как интересно!  Я буду в централной Азии следующий год.  Я буду учиться в Бишкеке, и напишу диссертацию о русском языке в Киргизии.   
"в следующем году".

Wow! You are a brave guy!
Why did you choose Bishkek? The last time I was there I felt myself a bit unsafe.

During my childhood my parents and I often spent vacations at Issyk-Kul lake. It was a splendid time! But then USSR was gone and many Russians left Kirgizstan for Russia. BTW: Many people usually think that I'm Kazakh if I was born in Kazakhstan. But this is is not true. There were more than 50% Russians in Kazakhstan by the time when USSR was gone. So when Kazakhstan and Kirgizstan had become independent countries we, Russians, felt ourselves a bit unwelcome in these countries. Most Russians left for Russia, including my family. But it seems to me that now Kazakhs become rather friendly and tolerant to other nations. Kirgizs are less friendly. And there were several disorders in Kirgizstan during last years...
So I would advise you to go to Almaty (Alma-Ata). But maybe dufficulties or something else attract you...

I can tell you some words about Russian language in Kazakhstan. May be you'll find them useful.
In the time of USSR Russian was a state language in Kazakhstan. In cities everybody used Russian. And even many urban Kazakhs couldn't speak Kazakh language. But in kazakh nomadic villages (they are called "aul", "аул") you could meet an old man who coudn't speak Russian. So Russian was the language of the cities.
After Kazakhstan obtained independence Kazakh became the state language. Russian was declared as the language of the international intercourse. And gradually Russian was replaced by Kazakh. In the time of my teen ages Kazakhs used a mix of Russian and Kazakh in familiar conversations. Now they use generally Kazakh. But they have to speak Russian to Russians. Because the rest of Russians don't want to learn Kazakh. But I think that in the further they will have to learn it.
As for official documents they are duplicated in Russian at present. But soon it will be stoped.

I suppose a similar situation is in Kirgizstan except one thing. I'm not sure but several years ago Russian became there a state language again.

Quote
Наличная улица...около станции метро Приморская?  Я жил на Капитанской улице.  По-английскии мы сказали бы "It's a small world."
In this situation Russians usually say "мир тесен".

Quote
Сегодня 30 градов здесь!  И летом может быть 50 градов.  Летом сколько градов в Казахстане?   
"градусов"
The average temperature there is about 25-35 degrees from May till September. Seldom up to 40.

Quote
Я надеюсь что ты не посмотрел фильм Борат!   Wink
No, I didn't. Is it really so stupid and unpleasant as I've heard?
« Last Edit: November 15, 2007, 12:07:04 PM by msmirnov » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2007, 04:44:56 PM »

Wow! You are a brave guy!
Why did you choose Bishkek? The last time I was there I felt myself a bit unsafe.

Тепер я боюсь!  Когда был твой последний раз в Бишкеке? 

I initially wanted to go to Uzbekistan, because my university offers Uzbek language courses.  I thought it would be an interesting way to learn both Russian and another language at the same time.  But because of the bad political relationship between Bush and Karimov, my university will no longer allow students to study there.  Since that wouldn't work I tried to make arrangements in Shymkent, since I could still learn Uzbek and Russian there.  But that didn't work out.  My last resort is a programme in Bishkek that is designed for foreigners to learn Russian.  Since my university will allow me to go on only that programme, that is my only option if I want to study Russian in Central Asia.  So if all goes according to plan, I should be leaving in late May. 

Quote
During my childhood my parents and I often spent vacations at Issyk-Kul lake. It was a splendid time! But then USSR was gone and many Russians left Kirgizstan for Russia. BTW: Many people usually think that I'm Kazakh if I was born in Kazakhstan. But this is is not true. There were more than 50% Russians in Kazakhstan by the time when USSR was gone. So when Kazakhstan and Kirgizstan had become independent countries we, Russians, felt ourselves a bit unwelcome in these countries. Most Russians left for Russia, including my family. But it seems to me that now Kazakhs become rather friendly and tolerant to other nations. Kirgizs are less friendly. And there were several disorders in Kirgizstan during last years...

A few suggestions:
It sounds better to say either "Many people" or "Usually people" but not both in the same sentence.  I would say, "Many people think that I'm Kazakh, since (or you could say because) I was born in Kazakhstan.

Kyrgyzstan is the most common spelling in English.  In very official documents "Kyrgyz Republic" is also used.  But many names from the former USSR now have many different spellings in English.  For example, Азербайджан can be spelled Azerbaijan, Azerbayjan or Azerbaidzhan.

I would not use "had" and instead write: So when Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan became independent...
And also: It seems to me that now Kazakhs have become rather friendly...
And: during the last few years rather than during last years. 

Quote
So I would advise you to go to Almaty (Alma-Ata). But maybe dufficulties or something else attract you...

Difficulties (note the spelling) do attract me!  More specifically, I am going to be researching the role of language policy in ethnic conflict.   

Quote
I can tell you some words about Russian language in Kazakhstan. May be you'll find them useful.
In the time of USSR Russian was a state language in Kazakhstan. In cities everybody used Russian. And even many urban Kazakhs couldn't speak Kazakh language. But in kazakh nomadic villages (they are called "aul", "аул") you could meet an old man who coudn't speak Russian. So Russian was the language of the cities.
After Kazakhstan obtained independence Kazakh became the state language. Russian was declared as the language of the international intercourse. And gradually Russian was replaced by Kazakh. In the time of my teen ages Kazakhs used a mix of Russian and Kazakh in familiar conversations. Now they use generally Kazakh. But they have to speak Russian to Russians. Because the rest of Russians don't want to learn Kazakh. But I think that in the further they will have to learn it.
As for official documents they are duplicated in Russian at present. But soon it will be stoped.

Thank you for the information.

"In the time of USSR Russian was a state language in Kazakhstan."
In the Soviet era, In the time of the USSR, In Soviet times - these would all sound more natural in English. Also if Russian was the only state language it should say, Russian was the state language. 

"And even many urban Kazakhs couldn't speak Kazakh language."
In English it is either Kazakh, Russian, German etc. without the word language or if you do use the word language it must be the Kazakh language, the Russian language, etc.  For commonly known languages, just the name of the language is most often used.  But for less commonly known languages (like Kazakh!) saying "the Kazakh language" is more frequent. 
 
"In the time of my teen ages Kazakhs used a mix of Russian and Kazakh in familiar conversations"
When I was a teenager, Kazakhs...

"But they have to speak Russian to Russians."
But they have to speak Russian to the Russians. 

"Because the rest of Russians don't want to learn Kazakh."
Because the rest of the Russians...

"But I think that in the further they will have to learn it."
But I think that in the future...

"But soon it will be stoped."
stopped.

Quote
I suppose a similar situation is in Kirgizstan except one thing. I'm not sure but several years ago Russian became there a state language again.

Except for one thing is better way to word that.

Quote
No, I didn't. Is it really so stupid and unpleasant as I've heard?

Да.  Я ушёл из кино после десяти минут начал фильм. 

If you don't mind writing more in English, I'd be interested to know what you felt was unsafe in Bishkek. 
« Last Edit: November 15, 2007, 04:45:20 PM by Νεκτάριος » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2007, 07:01:38 PM »

Я изучаю русский язык, потому что люблю русскую литературу и русский язык ещё важный в постсоветском мире.  Я любил бы читать Достоевского и Тургенева на русском языке.  Но мне трудно читать Толстого на английском!  И конечно, я люблю читать Пушкина и Лермонтова.  Сейчас могу только читать газети как Аргументи и Факти без словари.  И как я сказал, мой дедушка из Польши и говорит по-русский.  Но, мы говорим другу друга только по-польскии или по-английскии.  И я интересуюсь политикой и историей в восточной европе и централной азии.  Изучать это в университете, мне нужно было изучать русский язык тоже.  Я рад, что я изучаю русский язык потому что мне всегда интересно было.  Я мог учиться в России на стипендии.  Я надеюсь учитьсся в ценралной азии.  Сколько Американцых знают где Бишкек или что Бишкек?!  Здесь монго вожмостей для человека которые знает русский язык (на пример, работать в государстве или как бизнесман). 

Почему я православий?  Конечно как поляк, когда я  родился  был католиком.  Но мы не ходили в храм очень часто.  Когда я нашёл Христоса, было через православную церковь.  Мне не важнио что много людей думают что церковь только для русских.  Мне церковь только о Христосе, Боге, любви и нет о народости.  У моего храм здесь литургия и на английском и на грекском.  Наш патриарх - патриарх Константинопола. 
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« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2007, 07:44:15 PM »

Another thing I noticed:
"Please, correct my English if you notice any mistake."

It would be better to say "Please correct my English if you notice any mistakes"
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« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2007, 10:02:16 AM »

So about Bishkek.

The last time I was there was six years ago.
But last Friday I consulted with my friends who live in Almaty. Some of them recently were in Bishkek. They told me that now it's rather quiet in Bishkek. But Kyrgyztan is very poor country, poorer than Kazakhstan and much poorer than Russia. So the one who has hundred dollars in his pocket is considered a rich person there. That is why a foreigner (especially from America or Europe) must be a very careful since he can be cheated out of his money. It would be wonderful if somebody attend you in an airport and in other places. Unfortunaly, lonely foreigner is an easy target for stealing, trickery or even attack.

But maybe I'm dramatizing. Has anybody from your university been to Bishkek already?

And as I've said before, in my opinion the best city for you in Central Asia is Almaty. Is it really impossible to make arrangements there?
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« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2007, 09:15:06 PM »

Thanks for the information about Bishkek; at least it is rather quiet now.  That is the impression one of my professors had when he was there earlier this year. 

I'll have to be careful, but the problems you mentioned happened to several other American students in my group in Moscow this summer.  A couple of people were beat up, one robbed at knife point and many others had their wallets stolen in the metro.  But, they all wore very American looking clothes and shoes, drew a lot of attention to themselves and didn't speak much Russian at all.  Thankfully I never had any problems, and whenever I did talk to people they always assumed I was German (I'm all of 0% German!) rather than American, so maybe that helped.

Unfortunately, my university is stubborn about establishing new programs so I am stuck with Bishkek if I want to study Russian in Central Asia.  There use to be a program where a professor took students to Almaty, but there was growing hostility to it being a Russian language program rather than Kazakh or Russian and Kazakh.  I definitely will visit Almaty though, since I will be so close. 
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« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2007, 08:50:29 AM »

Я изучаю русский язык, потому что люблю русскую литературу и русский язык ещё важный в постсоветском мире.  Я любил бы читать Достоевского и Тургенева на русском языке.  Но мне трудно читать Толстого на английском!  И конечно, я люблю читать Пушкина и Лермонтова.  Сейчас могу только читать газети как Аргументи и Факти без словари.  И как я сказал, мой дедушка из Польши и говорит по-русский.  Но, мы говорим другу друга только по-польскии или по-английскии.  И я интересуюсь политикой и историей в восточной европе и централной азии.  Изучать это в университете, мне нужно было изучать русский язык тоже.  Я рад, что я изучаю русский язык потому что мне всегда интересно было.  Я мог учиться в России на стипендии.  Я надеюсь учитьсся в ценралной азии.  Сколько Американцых знают где Бишкек или что Бишкек?!  Здесь монго вожмостей для человека которые знает русский язык (на пример, работать в государстве или как бизнесман). 

Почему я православий?  Конечно как поляк, когда я  родился  был католиком.  Но мы не ходили в храм очень часто.  Когда я нашёл Христоса, было через православную церковь.  Мне не важнио что много людей думают что церковь только для русских.  Мне церковь только о Христосе, Боге, любви и нет о народости.  У моего храм здесь литургия и на английском и на грекском.  Наш патриарх - патриарх Константинопола. 

"русский язык ещё важный в постсоветском мире."
Будет более по-русски, если сказать: "русский язык ещё важен в постсоветском мире"
В принципе в твоем предложении всё правильно. Но обычно, когда говорят "всё ещё ...", употребляют краткие прилагательные (которые отвечают на вопрос "каков?" или "какова?").
"Она всё еще красива, несмотря на её возраст."

"Я любил бы читать"
Глагол "любить" очень редко употребляется в условном наклонении. Лучше сказать "Я хотел бы читать".

"Но мне трудно читать Толстого на английском!"
It's difficult to me to read his books in Russian Smiley I couldn't read "War and Peace" to the end.

"И конечно, я люблю читать Пушкина и Лермонтова."
You are very happy! I have no time to read classic literature Sad

"Сейчас могу только читать газети как Аргументи и Факти без словари."
Сейчас без словаря могу только читать газеты такие, как Аргументы и Факты.
I don't like this paper. They frequently publish occult articles, and I don't like how they interpret many events. I've often heard that they rejected to publish articles about Orthodoxy.

As for me, the best news site in Russian: http://www.interfax.ru. It is very objective without any partial comments. The best religion news site is http://www.interfax-religion.ru. There are articles about different religion events in Russia.
I like to read http://www.pravmir.ru - Russian Orthodox site. It has English version http://www.pravmir.com, but there are much less articles than in Russian.
I usually consult http://days.pravoslavie.ru/ about events in Russian Orthodox calendar and about hagiography.
If you don't mind to hear Russian speech you can visit http://www.predanie.ru/. This is an Orthodox site containing many lectures about theology in mp3, church chants and videos concerning Orthodoxy. My wife and I love to listen to lectures of professors of theology Алексей Ильич Осипов and deacon Андрей Кураев and to talks of metropolitan Антоний Сурожский. They clarified to us many difficult theology questions.

I also would like to advise you very very useful site for English-Russian and Russian-English translation: http://www.multitran.ru/. There are many examples of usage of Russian and English collocations and expressions.

"мы говорим другу друга"
мы говорим друг с другом

"по-польскии или по-английскии"
по-польски или по-английски

"историей в восточной европе и централной азии"
историей Восточной Европы и Центральной Азии

"Изучать это в университете, мне нужно было изучать русский язык тоже."
При изучении этих предметов в университете мне также нужно изучать русский язык.
Для изучения этих предметов ...
Чтобы изучать эти предметы ...

"Сколько Американцых знают где Бишкек или что Бишкек?!"
Сколько американцев знают где находиться Бишкек или что такое Бишкек?!
Smiley
Среди русских распространено мнение, что многие американцы думают будто Москва - это деревня, которая стоит посреди тайги, а по Красной Площади гуляют медведи. Это правда? Smiley

"православий"
православный

"Когда я нашёл Христоса, было через православную церковь"
Когда я нашёл Христа, это произошло с помощью православной церкви.
Учитывая что ты православный, лучше сказать: "С помощью православной церкви я познал/обрёл Бога."
Почему-то у нас фразами типа "обрёл Христа", "познал Христа" пользуются в основном протестанты. Возможно потому что большинство наших протестантских церквей родом из Америки, и американские проповедники принесли эту традицию. Православные в таком случае обычно говорят: "обрёл Бога", "познал Бога". Хотя по смыслу разницы, конечно, никакой нет.

"Мне церковь только о Христосе, Боге, любви и нет о народости."
Для меня Церковь - это прежде всего Христос, Бог и Любовь, а не принадлежность к какому-то народу.

Did your relatives feel strongly about you changed Church?
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« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2007, 10:07:07 PM »

It's difficult to me to read his books in Russian Smiley I couldn't read "War and Peace" to the end.

Это мой подвиг читать Толстого  Wink 

"И конечно, я люблю читать Пушкина и Лермонтова."
You are very happy! I have no time to read classic literature Sad

По-английскии два слова что значит "счастливый".  Здесь я сказал бы "You are very lucky!" 

Quote
As for me, the best news site in Russian: http://www.interfax.ru. It is very objective without any partial comments. The best religion news site is http://www.interfax-religion.ru. There are articles about different religion events in Russia.
I like to read http://www.pravmir.ru - Russian Orthodox site. It has English version http://www.pravmir.com, but there are much less articles than in Russian.
I usually consult http://days.pravoslavie.ru/ about events in Russian Orthodox calendar and about hagiography.

Спасибо большое!  Тепер я буду читать эти газеты когда у меня есть времена.  Но в две недели у меня будет контролные работы.  Только книг (или книги?) дла заданий сейчас.       

Quote
If you don't mind to hear Russian speech you can visit http://www.predanie.ru/. This is an Orthodox site containing many lectures about theology in mp3, church chants and videos concerning Orthodoxy. My wife and I love to listen to lectures of professors of theology Алексей Ильич Осипов and deacon Андрей Кураев and to talks of metropolitan Антоний Сурожский. They clarified to us many difficult theology questions.

Спасибо!  Метрополитан Антоний Сурожский знамениитый по-английскии.  Хорошо будет слушать его по-русскии. 

Quote
I also would like to advise you very very useful site for English-Russian and Russian-English translation: http://www.multitran.ru/. There are many examples of usage of Russian and English collocations and expressions.

Thanks, that will be very useful.

Quote
Среди русских распространено мнение, что многие американцы думают будто Москва - это деревня, которая стоит посреди тайги, а по Красной Площади гуляют медведи. Это правда? Smiley

Жаль, это правда.  Когда я был в Москве мои родители боялись Cheesy

Quote
"Мне церковь только о Христосе, Боге, любви и нет о народости."
Для меня Церковь - это прежде всего Христос, Бог и Любовь, а не принадлежность к какому-то народу.

I don't understand when it is better to say "для меня" or "мне". 

Quote
Did your relatives feel strongly about you changed Church?

Oddly enough my Grandparents (who haven't been inside any church in forty years) were upset at first.  Now nobody really cares.  My parents kind of like the idea of Orthodoxy, but most of the churches in the area have a very "ethnic" feel to them so it would be very difficult for them to fit in.   

Happy Thanksgiving  Grin  Now that I have everything cleaned up from the big dinner, I'm off to a friend's house for the other Thanksgiving ritual: college football.  My university's team is in a "must-win" game!  There is nothing like American football (except for baseball!). 
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« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2007, 10:15:31 PM »

"Eto moj podvig chitat' Tolstogo."

My dear brother Nektarios, I do understand, and I commend you for trying!!!:)SmileySmiley

It's worth it though. Just listen to this music... "Jezheli by ja byl ne ja, a krasivejshyj, umnyejshyj, i luchshij v mire chelovek, i byl by svoboden, ja by siju zhe minutu na kolenyakh prosil ruki i lyubvi Vashej." (Peierre Bezoukhoff to Natasha Rostova, one of the last paragraphs of the 2-nd vol. of "War and Peace")
« Last Edit: November 22, 2007, 10:16:02 PM by Heorhij » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2007, 09:03:51 AM »

I'll have to be careful, but the problems you mentioned happened to several other American students in my group in Moscow this summer.  A couple of people were beat up, one robbed at knife point and many others had their wallets stolen in the metro. 
It's very sad, but Moscow as the biggest and richest city of Russia attracts criminals from the whole FSU. Thank God, Petersburg is more quiet.

Quote
But, they all wore very American looking clothes and shoes, drew a lot of attention to themselves and didn't speak much Russian at all. 
I see that you understand the eye of the problem. God bless you!

I have a good school friend Василий. He lives in Almaty. He lived several years in Anchorage when he worked in the international oil company, so his English is rather fluent. I would like to give you his phone number so that you will be able to call him for help or advice if you need it. I have already arranged this with him. Please remind me in april or may to do this if I forget.

Спасибо большое!  Тепер я буду читать эти газеты когда у меня есть времена.  Но в две недели у меня будет контролные работы.  Только книг (или книги?) дла заданий сейчас.       
"Теперь я буду читать эти газеты, когда у меня будет время. Но в следующие две недели у меня будут контрольные работы. Сейчас читаю только книги для выполнения заданий."

Quote
Метрополитан Антоний Сурожский
"Метрополит Антоний Сурожский"

Quote
Жаль, это правда.
Жаль, но это правда.

I don't understand when it is better to say "для меня" or "мне".
I see your difficulty. There is only one English collocation "for me" for both Russian pronouns. The usage of them is obvious for me, so let me think a little about it. I need some time to formulate a rule.

Quote
There is nothing like American football (except for baseball!). 
Rules of American football is similar to the rules of rugby, isn't it? But I do not understand the sense of baseball Sad
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« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2007, 01:25:10 PM »

It's very sad, but Moscow as the biggest and richest city of Russia attracts criminals from the whole FSU. Thank God, Petersburg is more quiet.

I really enjoyed Petersburg and always felt safe there.  I have many fond memories of sitting on the beach (even if it is a bit dirty!) at the end of Kapitanskaya Ulitsa and watching the белые ночи. 

Quote
I have a good school friend Василий. He lives in Almaty. He lived several years in Anchorage when he worked in the international oil company, so his English is rather fluent. I would like to give you his phone number so that you will be able to call him for help or advice if you need it. I have already arranged this with him. Please remind me in april or may to do this if I forget.

Thank you! 

Speaking of Alaska, you might find this interesting.  We consider our first American Orthodox Saint to be one of the first missionaries sent from Russia to Alaska.  You can read about him and other American Saints here: http://oca.org/FSnasaints.asp?SID=4
The Orthodox Church in American (OCA) of today is descended from the early Russian missions in North America.  The OCA website gives a good idea of what typical Orthodox life is like in the US. 

Quote
I don't understand when it is better to say "для меня" or "мне".
I see your difficulty. There is only one English collocation "for me" for both Russian pronouns. The usage of them is obvious for me, so let me think a little about it. I need some time to formulate a rule.

I've been trying to think of a rule for when to translate счастливый as happy and when to translate it as lucky.  It is the same situation; for me it is obvious, but I don't think I know how to explain it. 

Quote
Rules of American football is similar to the rules of rugby, isn't it? But I do not understand the sense of baseball Sad

American football is similar to rugby but with more complications.  I have no idea how to explain baseball in a simple way.  I guess it is a strange sport.   Nothing is as strange as British sports though; I am entirely baffled by cricket.   
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« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2007, 07:40:33 AM »

I got a wonderful explanation of the usage of "мне" and "для меня". I attached it to the message. If you find something unclear, please ask.

I really enjoyed Petersburg and always felt safe there.  I have many fond memories of sitting on the beach (even if it is a bit dirty!) at the end of Kapitanskaya Ulitsa and watching the белые ночи. 
You are always welcome! I'll be glad to see you in Petersburg!

Quote
Speaking of Alaska, you might find this interesting.  We consider our first American Orthodox Saint to be one of the first missionaries sent from Russia to Alaska.  You can read about him and other American Saints here: http://oca.org/FSnasaints.asp?SID=4
The Orthodox Church in American (OCA) of today is descended from the early Russian missions in North America.  The OCA website gives a good idea of what typical Orthodox life is like in the US. 
I found there St. John Kochurov. He lived last 10 years in Petersburg's suburb Царское Село. There he was shot by bolsheviks. So in all Petersburg's churches we pray to him and call him Св. Иоанн, священномученик Царскосельский и Петроградский.

Tonight we have a Christmas party in our company. A vice-president has arrived from Finland to attend it. As you know both Finnish and Russian like to drink some vodka. I think it will be a hard evening to me, because it's just the beginning of the Nativity Fast now and I have to attend this party since it is a team-building event.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2007, 09:07:07 AM by msmirnov » Logged
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« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2007, 02:23:03 PM »

I got a wonderful explanation of the usage of "мне" and "для меня". I attached it to the message. If you find something unclear, please ask.

Thanks.  It does make a bit more sense now.

Quote
Tonight we have a Christmas party in our company. A vice-president has arrived from Finland to attend it. As you know both Finnish and Russian like to drink some vodka. I think it will be a hard evening to me, because it's just the beginning of the Nativity Fast now and I have to attend this party since it is a team-building event.

I think it would be more accurate in English to say "Both Fins and Russians like to drink an insane amount of vodka."   Wink  If I only I could buy a litre of Vodka for 120 rubles or so here.

I hope you have a spiritually beneficial fast.  My parish uses the new calendar, so we're two weeks ahead.  It's already the Feast of St. Andrew today!   

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