OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 02, 2014, 10:45:30 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Apodosis of feasts  (Read 545 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
scamandrius
Crusher of Secrets; House Lannister
Warned
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek by desire; Antiochian by necessity
Posts: 5,959



« on: June 15, 2010, 07:28:46 PM »

I've been reading John McGuckin's book, St. Cyril of Alexandria and the Christology Controversy.  I haven't eve made it out of chapter 1 yet but he has finally narrated the story to the actual coming together of the council and said that one reason the Syrian delegation was unable to be present at Ephesus for the opening proceedings (and much of the debate following) was due to their geographic location and that the bishops and their entourage would need 30 days to arrive (which they grossly underestimated).  But they did not set out immediately following Pascha of that year since they observed the Apodosis or leave-taking for 8 days.  The way McGuckin seems to frame this is that the Syrians were the only ones who observed apodoses or leave-takings of feasts at the time.  Questions:  Were apodoses of feasts added later?  Were such observances uniquely Syrian which became part of the Byzantine Festal Calendar?  Thanks.
Logged

I seek the truth by which no man was ever harmed--Marcus Aurelius

Those who do not read  history are doomed to get their facts from Hollywood--Anonymous

What earthly joy remains untouched by grief?--St. John Damascene
Subdeacon Michael
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 195



« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2010, 09:57:39 AM »

I can't answer the question directly but am able to add that the western rites also have an afterfeast with an equivalent to the leave-taking.  It is known as the octave (as it usually, but not always, lasts for eight days).  If it spread to the Byzantine rite from the Syriac tradition then it also made its way further west.
Logged

'There is nothing upon earth holier, higher, grander, more solemn, more life-giving than the Liturgy. The church, at this particular time, becomes an earthly heaven; those who officiate represent Christ Himself, the angels, the cherubim, seraphim and apostles.' - St John of Kronstadt
scamandrius
Crusher of Secrets; House Lannister
Warned
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek by desire; Antiochian by necessity
Posts: 5,959



« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2010, 10:00:11 PM »

^Thanks, Subdeacon.  The thing that struck me was that the leave-taking was set at 8 days.  For most feasts, excepting Pascha, of course, and Presentation of our Lord, the leave-taking is usually set at 7 days where as for the two I mentioned it is 40 days and variable depending on how close we are to Triodion.  So, why was 8 the standard for the Syrians?  And was there no apodosis in the other Byzantine churches?  THe Syrians obviously had much further to go to get to Ephesus than many other delegations but those delegations seemed to bypass any leave-taking and head right to Ephesus. 
Logged

I seek the truth by which no man was ever harmed--Marcus Aurelius

Those who do not read  history are doomed to get their facts from Hollywood--Anonymous

What earthly joy remains untouched by grief?--St. John Damascene
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.044 seconds with 30 queries.