OrthodoxChristianity.net
July 25, 2014, 12:08:38 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Why Protestantism?  (Read 26391 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ytterbiumanalyst
Professor Emeritus, CSA
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the Midwest
Posts: 8,790



« on: October 13, 2007, 10:06:58 PM »

In honor of this new forum (and thank you to the administrators for creating it), I will begin what I hope is a long series of fruitful discussions.

For those who are or have been in a Protestant denomination, why did you choose that denomination?

For me, I converted from the Assemblies of God, and I chose it mainly because of their Trinitarian theology, especially their emphasis on the work of the Holy Spirit. In previous churches I had been a member of, the Holy Spirit was not mentioned at all or else was treated as less important than the Father and the Son. This emphasis on the Trinity was a very important factor in my search for Orthodoxy and is a belief that remained unchanged throughout my conversion to Orthodox Christianity.
Logged

"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
EofK
Mrs. Y
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the Midwest
Posts: 3,976


lolcat addict


« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2007, 08:06:45 PM »

I'm sad to say there wasn't much thought put into my membership in various Baptist churches, mostly Southern Baptist.  My parents were Free Will Baptist, so that's where we went.  I ended up in a SB church because was the only church in my hometown that had a youth group that was interested more in bible study than in winning prizes for attending Sunday school.  Once I got to college, though, I started to realize that there were a whole lot of things I was missing and one of those was any knowledge of the Holy Spirit.  From my experience, Southern Baptists do tend to minimize the other members of the Trinity and focus on the work of Jesus only.  After that, I went to a few AOG churches, a few non-denominational churches, and was basically treading water when I found out we had an Orthodox Church in town. 

I have to say, though, one thing I did appreciate about Protestanism and my education at a Protestant university is the emphasis on personal responsibility for your salvation and studying the bible.  I never liked that idea, "Well, I'm sure to be saved because my dad's a preacher," or, "My mom taught Sunday school."  So?  What are you doing?  As far as bible study goes, I have to admit I haven't done a lot since I've been in Orthodoxy, but at the same time, I'm trying to understand what I'm seeing in liturgy, catching up on the lives of the saints, and figuring out the Orthodox view on various ideas.  In some ways, I'm a little hesitant to study much as I still tend to interpret things through the Protestant view, though my outlook has changed considerably even in the last year.
Logged

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so. -- Douglas Adams
PeterTheAleut
The Right Blowhard Peter the Furtive of Yetts O'Muckhart
Moderator
Protospatharios
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 31,477


EXTERMINATE!


« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2007, 12:25:00 AM »

I was in the Church of the Nazarene for many years because that's where Mom took me when she went to church.  At the time, a lot of issues in my own family really squelched any love for Christ that was trying to blossom within me from my regular activity at the church, but I did eventually come through this by the grace of God to the point of committing my own life to Christ, albeit as I came to understand this within the Wesleyan Holiness tradition of the CotN.  Ironically, as it would turn out later during my conversion to Orthodoxy, God worked the initial spark of my salvation through a CotN Communion service--my own experience would tell me that Christ really was present in CotN Communion, though not in the same, much more real way that I experience His presence in the Orthodox Eucharist.  (That night in the CotN I actually did NOT receive Communion, though it was offered to me, because I felt a very strong conviction that my sins had separated me from Communion and that I needed to repent.)

From that time forward, as I moved across country from my birth state of Illinois to my Grandma's residence in Oregon and then, from there, to college, I always sought my home in the churches of the Wesleyan tradition--even the Quaker church I called home during my university years was part of a yearly meeting of Friends that was heavily influenced by Wesleyan holiness themes.  I have since abandoned their teetotalism as an unhealthy and unchristian disdain for the good things of Creation, and I recognize the pitfalls of the CotN emphasis on Entire Sanctification as a second, "at-one-moment" work of grace.  But I have to admit that I see a lot of continuity between John Wesley's teaching of Sanctification and holiness--albeit in the more ethical and moral dimensions I learned--and the traditional Orthodox teachings on Theosis and personal responsibility for working out one's salvation "with fear and trembling".
« Last Edit: October 15, 2007, 04:09:51 AM by PeterTheAleut » Logged
aserb
asinner
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Self Ruled Antiochian Archdiocese
Posts: 1,188


« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2007, 11:18:49 AM »

The question for me would be why did I leave Orthodoxy for Protestantism  - - - then return to Orthodoxy.

As a child I never really connected with the Orthodox church on a psycho-social level. The evangelical camp has "making connections" down pat. In reality, this is all that anybody really wants. Now to be fair my parents were not good church goers and so my connection was not facilitiated well.  On the other hand when friends of mine became "born - agian" I "connected with them. Interestingly, when I prayed to become "born - again", I prayed the Jesus prayer. Anyway, once inside I began seeing alot of theological contradictions, missed or unanswered theological questions, gaps in beliefs and of course being the history nut that I am -  - why did most evangelical theology start in 1500. The church existed before that. You mean to tell me that a loving and merciful God started the church in 33 and then let it fall apart in the 4th century only to be resurrected in the 1500's.  What kind of God would do that? This nagged me to death. I could ramble on for hours, but I have re-connected with Orthodoxy for the past five years.

Slavea Isusu Christu!
Logged

Save us o' Son of God, who art risen from the dead, as we sing to thee Alleluia!
calligraphqueen
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: GOA
Posts: 341


« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2007, 11:06:38 AM »

My parents firmly embedded me in the baptist theology from an early age. We were transplanted from a legalistic church in CA where we could only wear long dresses, (never cut our hair (females) not own a radio, etc. ) to a famous ministry in central VA.  I got placed in their k-12 school and spent 9 years in that, as well as youth group travel and forced travel with my now ordained 'evangelist' father.  It was in this ministry, about about middle school age I started to notice some of the same discrepancies aserb mentioned. Why did history class go from the ascension straight to Luther's fun at the Wittenburg chapel?  Why did powerful people in the ministry display obviously unGodly behavior (adultery, fornication, bribery and extortion) and still be considered 'Godly'  If scripture was so clear on what was right and wrong, why did it only affect the 'middle class' and poor in said ministry? Where did scripture advocate for squads to be made up of only the large donator's children?  (remember I was 12) And more importantly, why did scripture advocate for women to stay with abusive men simply because they were 'married?"  I had lots of questions, and not one single teacher or mentor could answer them with anything but platitudes and tired cliche's.  Oh that frosted my much smaller behind!
So started my search. It took probably close to 20 years from early high school to now, but I fought and questioned so long even my dh had to listen. Once he was embedded in church abuse along with me, which we were shortly after we married, he woke up and started noticing things he had taken for granted.
Now I see simple things like the 'rapture' doctrine, three visits from Christ doesn't equal the two they always speak of. I see the fact that scripture had to come organized from some source and it didnt' float down onto Jerry's lap one day in KJV large print! I see a great many more fallacies if anything. 
While I struggle with improper emotions when I have to deal with some of my former comrades, I also feel a great sadness.  Most of the 'godliness' is contrived, a facade, because they don't have real answers.
I experienced opportunities with that ministry that my children will never have, as our tiny old parish does nothing at all.  I am not going to send them to camp in Greece to study greek culture, we aren't greek. But then again, at least they won't have to filter the nonsense that their parents have, they will only have the Orthodox experience to base from as they reach into adulthood.
Logged
Heorhij
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOA, for now, but my heart belongs to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church
Posts: 8,576



WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2007, 02:08:32 PM »

I was baptized Presbyterian, in early 2004, being already 46 years old. The reason I began to attend the church where I was baptized (it was a PC(USA) congregation) is because my wife's co-worker invited us there. I felt very "ecumentical," thinking, well, does it really matter that it's not Orthodox? It's all about Christ, about serving Christ, imitating Christ, glorifying God... and these guys are liberal (I myself is rather liberal socially, my sympathies have progressivly grown left since my move to the USA in 1990), and they do all this wonderful charities, and the minister is really outstanding - great personality, humble, a true believer and an incredible erudite in theology... So we stayed, and I soon became an elder, and it was all great... except that it continuied to strike me and to torment me from inside that it's not really a church, it's a social club with charities, with youth programs and daycare, and with a "christy-holyspirity" rhetoric. Sort of like when I was growing up in the former USSR and attending all the various Children of October - Young Pioneers - Young Communist League activities and we cleaned streets and helped the elderly in the name of building Communism, the same thing that liberal club where kids and adults do all these things in the name of Christ. No difference. Not the Church. No Tillichian "feeling of the immediate presence of the Holy," which I have always felt, since early childhood, in any Orthodox church.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2007, 02:09:19 PM by Heorhij » Logged

Love never fails.
Fr. David
The Poster Formerly Known as "Pedro"
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA, Diocese of the South
Posts: 2,828



WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2007, 02:49:29 PM »

Mom and I attended a Bible Church, which underwent a split, so we went to the Baptist church in town because we liked the way the Bible was, well, thumped (OK; that's what SHE liked; I was sweet on a girl in my Sunday School class... Grin)

Went off to college at ORU (Oral Roberts U in Tulsa for those who don't know), still a Baptist, though more of a Bapticostal at this point.

Basically I was thoroughly convinced that God's intent--as communicated in Scripture, so I thought--was the whole "legal contract" version of salvation, with justification being "God looking at me through Jesus-colored glasses," and sanctification following afterwards for those who "truly believed," so it was "all over but the shoutin',"  And I liked shoutin'--exuberant, emotional worship, hence my move to more charismatic circles.

QUICKLY became disillusioned with much of the latter, as I saw that any doctrine could be (and was) taught from the pulpit as long as the pulpiteer could show some kind of "Spirit-filled," emotion-whippin' credentials.  Was happy to be a Baptist and an English major (that dept. was and is very sane theologically, relatively speaking).  Attended a Christmas Eve communion service at my church in 1998 and just wept over the realization that my eating and drinking was meant to be so much more than a memorial meal.  Thus began a trek through the Ante-Nicean fathers, which guided me through Episcopalian and Catholic parishes and finally landed me in Orthodoxy.

The continuity of community--with unbroken chains of groups of bishops consecrating each new one, thus having intergenerational overlapping from the time of the Apostles to now--along with the continuity of worship plus the continuity of doctrine, theosis, communion of saints, the sacraments, ascesis...all this added up to my then surprising but now appreciated and loved home.

You can read the whole story here.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2007, 02:51:07 PM by DavidBryan » Logged

Priest in the Orthodox Church in America - ordained on March 18, 2012

Oh Taste and See (my defunct blog)

From Protestant to Orthodox (my conversion story)
Nyssa The Hobbit
Used to be OrthodoxFairyQueen
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian as of 1/10/09
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox
Posts: 396



WWW
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2007, 06:55:27 PM »

I'm not feeling well and can't type much, so I'll just post a link to my story: http://webpages.charter.net/nyssacugan/cgn_000046.htm
Logged

Author of "Tojet" (fantasy) and "The Lighthouse" (Gothic), info available at my website URL.
ignatius
Baptacathadox
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Roman Catholic > Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA - Diocese of the South
Posts: 1,690


My Son Aidan... :-)


« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2007, 09:14:52 PM »

My story is short and sweet...

Grew up Baptist but fell away and on the way back I couldn't reconcile it's teachings with the history of the church which led me to be a Roman Catholic (Latin at first and finally a Maronite Parish) where I continue to grow but I still really like learning about Orthodoxy at the Orthodox Mission Church here where I live.

Salve!
« Last Edit: October 16, 2007, 09:18:51 PM by ignatius » Logged

St Basil the Great (330-379 A.D.): “I think then that the one goal of all who are really and truly serving the Lord ought to be to bring back to union the churches who have at different times and in diverse manners divided from one another.”
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2007, 09:43:26 PM »

But I have to admit that I see a lot of continuity between John Wesley's teaching of Sanctification and holiness--albeit in the more ethical and moral dimensions I learned--and the traditional Orthodox teachings on Theosis and personal responsibility for working out one's salvation "with fear and trembling".

I see that same connection. Although I was a Calvinist, I took a course on Wesley's theology at the evangelical seminary I attended. It was taught by a visiting professor who whole-heartedly believed in holiness and that he himself had recieved this experience (and he was a wonderful, humble man). Although I intellectually disagreed with him and Wesley, something resonated within me. I think it was an early preparation for me for Orthodoxy 25 years later. When I first read about theosis, this was the first thing I thought of.

You know, the protestants are "almost there" on a lot of things. Many of their troubles come from having to go through all over again things that happened in the first 3 centuries of the Church and then try to construct a theology to explain it. Also because they will make a new schism at the drop of a hat!

But you can find alot of Orthodox dogma in fractured or not-quite-there-yet form in the various protestant streams. The problem is not a single one of them has all of it, so you have to look here, then there, ther way over there, then back over there. Very fatiguing. That is why it is so liberating to finally find the Orthodox Church as a protestant.
Logged
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2007, 10:17:37 PM »

Sorry, back to the OP

Parents brought up German Lutherans.
My childhood:
They went to Billy Graham crusade; one of the counseling preachers was an evangelical Prsebyterian minister and they went to his church before he moved on to another congregation and somehow I managed to be baptized in a Presbyterian church before (after his departure) they went to a Christiam Missionary Alliance church - a fundamentalist disaster for our family. (note: CMA only baptizes adults who are "saved")

My adolescence:
Somehow my parents stumbled back to a Presbyterian church in the evangelical wing of the the PCUSA. Things got better.

College and post-college years:
I attended RC Sproul's Study Center and became a Calvinist.
I went to evangelical seminary, got ordained as a Presbyterian minister (in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church - a smaller, very historically conscious, southern denomination; there were blue-bloods whose ancestors started that denomination in this country which made any ethnicity issues in Orthodoxy seem almost normal! Cool

Late 80's/early 90's:
left the ministry and church attandance for about a decade. Joined a liberal Presbyterian church in the late 90's (because literally, anything evangelical gave me nausea). Later I mustered up the gumption to join the contemporary worship band at my sister's church and deal with the evangelicals. The pastor who led the services was more of an emergent church thinker, than traditional evangelical. plus the band was really good and I got to play guitar in the band (which allowed me to explore using effects pedals to do more Edge and Andy Summers inspired atmospheric stuff to get out of the way of 2 other guitar players and a piano player, which was new for me, having been the only guitarist in jazz groups, wedding bands and solo gigs)

It was that pastor who indirectly led me to Orthodoxy. He told me how our contemporary worship service was more of a baby boomer thing. The 20 - somethings don't gravitate to that. Some of these emergent churches were experimenting with incense, candles, vestment and robes and the younger crowd liked that.
He pointed me toward some on-line stuff to read about that and I stumbled upon Frederica Mathewes Green.

Thus,almost exactly 5 years ago I learned about Orthodoxy.

The only things I miss are the camaraderie of that worship band and western Christmas carols.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2007, 10:19:50 PM by BrotherAidan » Logged
John of the North
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christianity
Jurisdiction: Eparchy of Edmonton and the West
Posts: 3,533


Christ is Risen!

tgild
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2007, 10:50:36 AM »

I'm not feeling well and can't type much, so I'll just post a link to my story: http://webpages.charter.net/nyssacugan/cgn_000046.htm

Well, I am not from a Protestant background, this sentence pretty much described December of 2006 for me...."I was finally ready to let go of my desire to be right, and to submit myself to the teachings of the Holy Apostolic and Orthodox Church.  I was exhausted." Every convert has to hit that point I think.

In Christ
Ivan
Logged

"Christianity is not a philosophy, not a doctrine, but life." - Elder Sophrony (Sakharov)
PeterTheAleut
The Right Blowhard Peter the Furtive of Yetts O'Muckhart
Moderator
Protospatharios
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 31,477


EXTERMINATE!


« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2007, 04:36:32 PM »

The side discussion regarding Protestant hymns and Christmas carols has become a very good discussion, but to keep it from cluttering up discussion of the OP of this thread, I created a new thread for it:  Protestant Hymns and Christmas Carols

-PeterTheAleut
Logged
trifecta
Fairly newly illumined
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 93



« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2007, 07:27:16 AM »

In a word, the Bible.  I chose Protestantism because its people read the Bible.  In my Catholic upbringing, I only heard the Bible in church.  The services were much more about the ceremony, which I liked.  But I thought my new college Protestant friends were more serious about God.

I learned about Jesus’ saving grace, and for the first time, understood what justification by faith alone meant.  I bought into it, partly because of the Protestants’ reverence for Scripture.

While they said they believe the Bible alone, it took me years to find out what they really believe in is their interpretation of the Bible, which turned out to be no better than the Catholic’s.  Then, I thought more about it and realized that sola Scriptura is not a biblical doctrine.  Jesus promises a church, not a book.   And what kind of “church” do the Protestants offer?  A divided one.  In my mind, there was really no reason to stay a Protestant. 
« Last Edit: October 26, 2007, 07:28:50 AM by trifecta » Logged

born Catholic, became a Protestant, now and hereafter an Orthodox Christian
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2007, 11:01:30 AM »

good line of reasoning trifecta
so I take it you are now Orthodox? or did you return to the RCC?
Logged
trifecta
Fairly newly illumined
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 93



« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2007, 06:31:12 AM »

Thanks for the comment and the question, Brother Aidan!

I am now an Orthodox Catechumen.  I am beginning to research (further) the Catholic view, because I want my next conversion to be my last!
Logged

born Catholic, became a Protestant, now and hereafter an Orthodox Christian
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2007, 11:50:04 PM »

yes, that too is a very good attitude
many blessing to you in your journey
Logged
pathofsolitude
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Immaculately Pure Hesychastic Orthodoxy of the Old Way
Jurisdiction: Unorganized Catacomb Communion in Exile- (the bishops have lost the faith)
Posts: 133


« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2007, 04:10:55 AM »

My favorite Protestant group is the Oneness Apostolics. Really. They are some of the only Protestants that almost approach Christian spirituality.
Logged

The great apostasy has occured. Get out of there while you can!!! Its better to be priestless than to have a heretic bishop. The apostles taught that the church consists of saints only. There are about 7,000 Spirit-bearers currently in the catacombs.
Ebor
Vanyar
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,358



« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2007, 11:13:56 AM »

"Christian Spirituality" does not belive in the Trinity? 

ummm, errmmm 


Ebor
Logged

"I wish they would remember that the charge to Peter was "Feed my sheep", not "Try experiments on my rats", or even "Teach my performing dogs new tricks". - C. S. Lewis

The Katana of Reasoned Discussion

For some a world view is more like a neighborhood watch.
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,810


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2008, 01:20:59 PM »

The thread entitled "Why do Protestants reject Orthodoxy?" has a lot on this theme (including posted there by me!), and also wanders off into what might be dubbed "Why do Orthodox reject Protestantism?" Be sure to read many of the postings by various people on that thread too.

I remain a Baptist: no need to repeat why here, when it's on the other thread, plus people's thoughtful and friendly replies.
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
Nyssa The Hobbit
Used to be OrthodoxFairyQueen
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian as of 1/10/09
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox
Posts: 396



WWW
« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2014, 06:26:13 PM »

I'm not feeling well and can't type much, so I'll just post a link to my story: http://webpages.charter.net/nyssacugan/cgn_000046.htm

Please note that this has changed: http://nyssashobbithole.com/wordpress/nyssas-opinions-theology/nyssas-conversion-story/
Logged

Author of "Tojet" (fantasy) and "The Lighthouse" (Gothic), info available at my website URL.
hecma925
Non-clairvoyant
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA - Diocese of the South
Posts: 5,970


Pray for me, a sinner.


WWW
« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2014, 07:28:26 PM »

Grew up Church of God (Cleveland, TN  based one) and Iglesia de Dios Pentecostal M.I. (two well-known Pentecostal denominations).  Parents were (still are, for the most part) anti-RC.  During and after college, became a non-denominational/Southern Baptist to agnostic.
Logged

Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.089 seconds with 51 queries.