Author Topic: 'It's beyond pain': how Mormons are left vulnerable in Utah's opiate crisis  (Read 188 times)

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Offline Minnesotan

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Maline Hairup was a devout Mormon. No alcohol, no coffee. She didn’t smoke. Until the day she died, she had never used illegal drugs. Yet she was an addict for most of her adult life.

“Maline never thought she had a problem,” said her sister, Mindy Vincent, a recovering addict. “She was a firm believer that because the doctor prescribed the pills it was OK. She didn’t see any shame in it. She didn’t think she was an addict. It wasn’t like taking drugs. But she was on the painkillers for 15 years until they wouldn’t give her any more.


More here. Especially interesting to see the role of "toxic perfectionism" in Mormon culture and how it contributes to this.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2016, 07:17:10 AM by Minnesotan »
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Offline Volnutt

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I wonder if we'll see this happen in Orthodox communities as well. It seems like there's the same potential for toxic perfectionism inherent in Orthodox theology (not that I think a Sola Fide system can't be vulnerable to that as well).

Maybe the fact that Orthodox are allowed to drink mitigates it some, though.
Is that what they teach you at the temple volnutt-stein?

Actually, it's Volnutt-berg.

Rome doesn't care. Rome is actually very cool guy.

Offline Daedelus1138

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I wonder if we'll see this happen in Orthodox communities as well. It seems like there's the same potential for toxic perfectionism inherent in Orthodox theology (not that I think a Sola Fide system can't be vulnerable to that as well).   

While I think Orthodoxy is potentially ripe for fanaticism (especially among converts... I speak from firsthand experience here observing it).  For many cradle Orthodox, it seems to me the religion is heavily about ethnicity more than precise theology and the beliefs about saints and prayers for the departed covers a lot of worries about individual sins.  There is also the concept of diakonia or "vocation" (in western Christian terms) that tempers the asceticism.  In most Orthodox countries, it seems that most people don't stress to much about fasting or attending church, even if that is the "ideal", and a lot of the religion seems passed down through other institutions, such as the family or the state.

Mormons, on the other hand, seem to be on a whole 'nother level of perfectionism. Utah also has some of the highest rates of anti-depressant use in the US. 

Most Protestant denominations and non-denoms, either work against or deny sola fide, at least in practice.  But they aren't as ascetic as Mormons or Orthodox, so it doesn't reach a toxic level unless you are in an oppressed minority group (single mother, gay, etc)... then in that case, why even bother with religion? 

« Last Edit: May 31, 2016, 10:56:29 PM by Daedelus1138 »

Offline Minnesotan

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I wonder if we'll see this happen in Orthodox communities as well. It seems like there's the same potential for toxic perfectionism inherent in Orthodox theology (not that I think a Sola Fide system can't be vulnerable to that as well).   

While I think Orthodoxy is potentially ripe for fanaticism (especially among converts... I speak from firsthand experience here observing it).
For many cradle Orthodox, it seems to me the religion is heavily about ethnicity more than precise theology and the beliefs about saints and prayers for the departed covers a lot of worries about individual sins.  There is also the concept of diakonia or "vocation" (in western Christian terms) that tempers the asceticism.  In most Orthodox countries, it seems that most people don't stress to much about fasting or attending church, even if that is the "ideal", and a lot of the religion seems passed down through other institutions, such as the family or the state.

Mormons, on the other hand, seem to be on a whole 'nother level of perfectionism. Utah also has some of the highest rates of anti-depressant use in the US. 

Most Protestant denominations and non-denoms, either work against or deny sola fide, at least in practice.  But they aren't as ascetic as Mormons or Orthodox, so it doesn't reach a toxic level unless you are in an oppressed minority group (single mother, gay, etc)... then in that case, why even bother with religion?

Convert fanaticism certainly is a well-documented phenomenon. It occurs in many different religions and denominations; much has been written about the so-called "Cage Stage Calvinists", for instance.

And then of course there are the converts to Islam (who make up a disproportionately large percentage among jihadists).
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Offline Daedelus1138

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Convert fanaticism certainly is a well-documented phenomenon. It occurs in many different religions and denominations; much has been written about the so-called "Cage Stage Calvinists", for instance.   

That's ironic because some "intense" Orthodox I have met have been former Reformed Christians (and I don't mean "intense" in a good way, I mean their approach to religion is sucking the humanity out of them).  I think its because both traditions are so totalizing.  Some of those Reformed "theologians" have a theological opinion for everything.

Quote
And then of course there are the converts to Islam (who make up a disproportionately large percentage among jihadists).

Years ago I knew a Buddhist that was like that.  He spent years in Thailand.  It was exactly like talking to a Christian fundamentalist.  Again, he had his hands on a totalizing worldview that permitted no uncertainty or mystery.

The Mormon opioid thing seems like a lot could be due to Mormon culture. No alcohol, no tobacco... so they have a culture that makes them open to addictive drugs prescribed by upstanding members of the community.  And being a product of American Evangelicalism, Mormonism is very much focused on outward appearances to judge whether or not something is sinful.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2016, 12:00:40 AM by Daedelus1138 »