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Author Topic: Concubines and Common Law living  (Read 6988 times) Average Rating: 0
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BasilCan
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« on: September 04, 2007, 10:27:46 PM »

Since the early church recognzied concubnines and other such "relationships" is there a way we can accomodate those who live common law for one reason or another?

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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2007, 11:05:36 PM »

I think we welcome them into our churches without judgment.

At such time that they convert, they should have an Orthodox wedding service.

My wife and I had had a civil marriage before a justice of the peace; in the eyes of the state it made us married. In the eyes of the Orthodox Church, we were not that different from a common law couple. When we converted, our priest married us.

Now, that is as regards catechumens or inquirers. As regards the laws of the various states I think we chould affirm the sanctity of civil marriages, heterodox marriages and the marriages of other religions.
These being between a man and a woman.

If homosexuals need something to preserve inheritance rights, acquire health insurance for a partner, etc. the state should have a civil union status that establishes these things without granting it the sanctity of marriage.

These are just my opinions on the matter.
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Anastasios
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2007, 11:30:01 PM »

Since the early church recognzied concubnines and other such "relationships" is there a way we can accomodate those who live common law for one reason or another?

Basil

That is a pretty broad statement. Could you elaborate? Thanks.
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2007, 11:20:31 AM »

I'm not sure what the Orthodox church can do about people outside of it; common-law marriage, civil marriage, non-Christian religious ceremonies--I always considered such marriages to be valid.  Why wouldn't they be?

But of course, converts to Orthodoxy need to do what the church requires of them.

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Anastasios
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« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2007, 11:34:02 AM »

I'm not sure what the Orthodox church can do about people outside of it; common-law marriage, civil marriage, non-Christian religious ceremonies--I always considered such marriages to be valid.  Why wouldn't they be?

But of course, converts to Orthodoxy need to do what the church requires of them.



Baptism is the gateway to the other sacraments, so if someone is not baptized, they are not married.  If you use natural law, you could argue that these relationships are natural unions and are not fornication--that is the perspective I agree with--but they are not sacramental marriages.

The Russians tend to not marry converts because joint reception of Holy Communion was the ancient practice to seal a union and that "suffices" to complete the union of those converting.  The Greeks have adopted a formal practice of marrying converts to one another in the Church to emphasize the sacramental blessing that occurs in the Church and since Greeks tended in the later centuries to baptize more frequently this was simply the established custom.

When I converted to Orthodoxy from Catholicism, my wife and I were baptized, chrismated, received communion, and then married to one another all at the same time. It was a very moving experience, one I will cherish forever.

Anastasios
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2007, 09:26:41 PM »

Anastasion,
I'm still searching.....!!!

Basil
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