Author Topic: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy  (Read 39552 times)

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Offline SherryTX

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Re: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy
« Reply #90 on: August 12, 2015, 07:37:35 PM »

For those like myself who are coming to Orthodoxy from a Protestant background, I also highly recommend Daniel B. Clendenin's book Eastern Orthodox Christianity: A Western Perspective


After going through this thread again, I decided to order the book above, since it sounds like it may be a little easier for me to understand. Looking forward to reading it!  After that I think I will take on the other one mentioned, "The Faith: Understanding Orthodox Christianity, An Orthodox Catechism"  as well.

This was also a really good book. Ware's book was much more in-depth of course, and written from a Protestant's perspective, but I feel it was a nice entry level book.

Offline Shamati

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Re: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy
« Reply #91 on: October 05, 2015, 04:18:18 PM »
The Mystery of Faith by Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: http://www.amazon.com/The-Mystery-Faith-Introduction-Spirituality/dp/0232524726


Bp Hilarion introduces the Orthodox Church & its theology, contrasting it to what he sees as western theology. He's very objective & not as polemical as some others can be.
At the end of each chapter he lists conclusions from the significant points of each chapter, often with quotes from orthodox saints & theologians, even modern writers like Kallistos Ware & John Meyendorff.

Way of the Ascetics: The Ancient Tradition of Discipline and Inner Growth by Tito Colliander: http://www.amazon.com/Way-Ascetics-Ancient-Tradition-Discipline/dp/0881410497/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1444076187&sr=1-1&keywords=tito+colliander

Is a small but great book that can introduces orthodox spirituality into ordinary, everyday life.

Offline Fabio Leite

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Re: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy
« Reply #92 on: October 05, 2015, 04:22:08 PM »
These are pretty good recommendations I found in comments for the Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy blog:

Quote
To conclude: you mentioned, Joel, the problem of figuring out “whose work I can trust to introduce me to the teachings and perspective of the Church.”

As for modern theologians, you cannot go wrong with Florovsky. You are right: up till now, he has been respected across the board, on all sides of the spectrum. Some on Mt Athos have called him a Church Father, and Elder Sophrony Sakharov once sent to him his own “theological confession,” asking for his judgment and saying “I need you to keep me on the royal road of the Fathers”. This attitude, however, is beginning to change among some of our liberal North American Orthodox academics: it is now becoming fashionable to attack Florovsky as “polemical,” “anti-Western,” encouraging a sterile repetition of patristic sayings, etc. In reality nothing could be further than the truth, and these people have not read Florovsky very extensively or carefully.

Fr Dumitru Staniloae is also especially good – a giant. Study him and Florovsky and you can have years of education.

And there are many others. Elder Emilianos of Simonopetra (Mt Athos) is probably your best contemporary monastic theologian, followed by Elder Sophrony Sakharov, Archimandrite Placide Deseille and Elder Vasileos of Simonopetra.

I especially recommend Archimandrite Placide’s beautiful essay, “Stages of a Pilgrimage,” in The Living Witness of the Holy Mountain: Contemporary Voices from Mt Athos, trans. and ed. Hieromonk Alexander [Golitzin] [South Canaan, PA: St Tikhon’s Seminary, 1999]. It is the most well-informed, balanced, fair and insightful treatment by a recent Orthodox writer on Roman Catholicism that I know of.

In this area, there are some things one cannot know from just playing with a prayer rope and pretending to be a hesychast – one must actually study the historical sources. Placide actually knows Roman Catholic theology, liturgy and spirituality at its best – he had the best French Cistercian monastic formation, and he converted to Orthodoxy after a long struggle.

Fr Patrick Henry Reardon is, IMO, one of our best popular writers here in America, with a deep knowledge of the Bible, the Liturgy and the Fathers of both East and West. Again, there are many others.
Many Energies, 3 Persons, 2 Natures, 1 God, 1 Church, 1 Baptism, and 1 Cup. The Son begotten only from the Father, the Spirit proceeding only from the Father, Each glorifying the Other. The Son sends the Spirit, the Spirit Reveals the Son, the Father is seen in the Son. The Spirit spoke through the Prophets and Fathers and does so even today.

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy
« Reply #93 on: November 25, 2015, 12:03:06 AM »
I was very touched by "God's Revelation to the Human Heart", by Fr. Seraphim Rose.
Only-begotten Son and Logos of God, being immortal, you condescended for our salvation to take flesh from the holy Theotokos and ever-virgin Mary and, without change, became man. Christ, our God, you were crucified and conquered death by death. Being one with the Holy Trinity, glorified with the Father and the Holy Spirit: save us.

Offline RaphaCam

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Re: Recommended Reading for Those New to Orthodoxy
« Reply #94 on: December 08, 2015, 01:24:34 AM »
Well, I'm profoundly interested in Church History. A friend of mine told me I should read The Mystery of Christian Power, by the English author Vladimir Moss. The book is too long, and I do not have much time, but a fast read on some chapters got me fascinated. I'm sure I'll still get it.

Today, I stumbled upon and started to read A Pocket Church History for Orthodox Christians, by Father Aidan Keller. It's a really short book, I fell like I'll end it tomorrow. A total must read for those interested on the subject.
Only-begotten Son and Logos of God, being immortal, you condescended for our salvation to take flesh from the holy Theotokos and ever-virgin Mary and, without change, became man. Christ, our God, you were crucified and conquered death by death. Being one with the Holy Trinity, glorified with the Father and the Holy Spirit: save us.