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ytterbiumanalyst
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« on: August 06, 2007, 08:42:10 AM »

I found a well-written and interesting article about children's entertainment here. I've been doing some thinking about this recently as we are selecting my daughter's first books. Those of you who have young daughters especially, to what extent does the article hit on truth? And what have you found to allow your children to participate in their culture while still protecting them from harm?
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« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2007, 09:06:55 AM »

Tired Dad - I think you need another swig of coffee (and the link to the article)  Smiley
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« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2007, 09:11:52 AM »

Tired Dad - I think you need another swig of coffee (and the link to the article)  Smiley
Try the word "here" above. Or here.
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« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2007, 09:14:56 AM »

So sorry!!   Now I'm really the one who needs to drink more coffee.  My highlight button and my text color were so similar I didn't notice it was a link. 
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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2007, 10:13:03 AM »

Great article.  I am the mom of two boys, 5 & 7 yo who has really struggled with this issue.  I had big ideas of my kids not watching TV, not playing with gun or military toys, and raising non-violent, gender-neutral boys.  That was before I considered that my husband is much more casual about this stuff and ideals get compromised when parents have different child rearing philosophies. I've loosened up alot and come to realize that no matter how much you shield kids, something is always going to leak in.  The kids do watch cartoons and videos, some of which they have seen through Mom and Dad's TV habits.  For example Futurama and The Simpsons, Lord of the Rings, but also, pretty graphic animal documentaries on National Geographic, military history shows, and documentaries about tribal cultures sans clothing.  I would rather they watch documentaries and learn something about the world than some of the horrible kid cartoons on The Cartoon Network (just watch an episode of the Ed, Ed and Eddie cartoon and you'll have hit at least 4 of the author's points).  OTOH, my kids love Johnny Quest (old JQ only), exactly the same cartoon we watched as kids and it's got some violence, cartoon sexism (Race Bannon - what a player), and it's not too accurate with the facts.  (The 5 yo is hilarious when he goes around quoting JQ.  "Mommy, Race Bannon says cave spiders are deadly poisonous".

I'd only say that you'll have an easier time of monitoring kid's TV watching when the parents agree on the same standards and stick to the plan.  However, be flexible enough to change it as needed.  I think I'd be more freaked about having daughters and the stuff they're exposed to.  Where do you think the next generation of Girls Gone Wild sluts come from?  It's the same cute, innocent little girls who are being marketed for Bratz dolls.
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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2007, 10:44:16 AM »

I'd only say that you'll have an easier time of monitoring kid's TV watching when the parents agree on the same standards and stick to the plan.  However, be flexible enough to change it as needed.  I think I'd be more freaked about having daughters and the stuff they're exposed to.  Where do you think the next generation of Girls Gone Wild sluts come from?  It's the same cute, innocent little girls who are being marketed for Bratz dolls.
Obviously my daughter's not able to watch TV yet, and I do like the idea of not turning it on for a couple of years. As for the Girls Gone Wild, I love the spoof in the show Arrested Development (excellent satire, no cheap laughs--exactly the way comedy ought to be). They show an ad for "Girls with Low Self-Esteem." Yep, that says it all.

My wife and I have been talking about dolls and such recently, and both Bratz and Barbie have hit a nerve with me. I'd rather stick to normal dolls sans attitude; I don't want my daughter thinking she has to be an unreasonable shape or have an attitude for her to have worth.

I remember when I was a boy, my parents allowed Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The way my brother and I played with them was that we worked as a team and humiliated Shredder. We never killed him, only ridiculed him. However, they disallowed Power Rangers, since we tended to fight each other. After one rather violent playtime in the back yard when my brother got hurt, Power Rangers disappeared forever. So I don't think it's the dolls themselves (boys hate it when their "action figures" are described as dolls, but that's what they are) that cause problems, it's the way the children use them. We'll have to just observe her with various toys and see what will benefit her and what will not.

BTW, my brother and I loved Johnny Quest when we were kids. We even had a rather intellectually challenging computer game called "Cover-up at Roswell" or something like that. It included a Mancala mini-game, and my brother and I played it so much my parents bought us a real set. No, it wasn’t always accurate with the facts, but they did serve as talking points with my parents, and we learned a lot just watching that show. One of the best in children's programming, in my opinion.
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« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2007, 12:16:08 PM »

Re. dolls, why not try some of the educational toy stores or websites or the attachment parenting websites.  A web search will give you a bunch of hits.  They usually carry nice, cutely, but modestly dressed dolls or dolls that show girls in alternative roles such as doctors, police officers, etc.  Or check at some of the bigger Christian bookstores.  They are big on modest, traditional girls dolls and toys.   

I had a really rude shock when I had to buy some toys for an Angel Tree gift this past Christmas.  I picked a girl's name since I never get to buy girlie stuff.  Went to Toys R Us and was just sick looking at the garbage that passes for girls toys and dolls.  Do they not think girls want to play with fun adventure toys (or was I just a total tom boy?)?  They're only choice is cutesy, frilly, sleezy or total bling-bling.  Did you know Barbie's got a credit card machine now?  Also, if you're an attachment parent, the dolls for younger children all come with the requisite baby bottle which reinforces the subtle idea that real babies drink from bottles, not their moms. 

I think you have to monitor your own kids.  Each one is different with regards to the way they play, the way they express their fantasy lives.  If you have reasonable limits, talk kids through their role-play, ask them questions, and just get in there and play with them on their own level, I think they'll be fine. 

My kids spent an hour yesterday running through a lawn sprinkler with a couple of plastic Kwan-Dao style swords they bought at Toys R Us with their own allowance (reward for being so incredibly good as altar servers through a very long Liturgy/Vespers combo).  They exercised, got really messy and learned a little about the history of real Chinese weapons, their uses in battle and how to properly attack with them (it helps to have a martial arts mom - if you're going to swing a broadsword, by gosh, do it right!). 

(Yeah Johnny Quest rules - favorite episodes The Curse of Anubis and The Invisible Monster.  My 5 yo still can't believe that mummies don't come back to life, but that episode really got my 7 yo interested in all things Egypt.)
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« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2007, 12:48:31 PM »

Obviously my daughter's not able to watch TV yet, and I do like the idea of not turning it on for a couple of years. As for the Girls Gone Wild, I love the spoof in the show Arrested Development (excellent satire, no cheap laughs--exactly the way comedy ought to be). They show an ad for "Girls with Low Self-Esteem." Yep, that says it all.

My wife and I have been talking about dolls and such recently, and both Bratz and Barbie have hit a nerve with me. I'd rather stick to normal dolls sans attitude; I don't want my daughter thinking she has to be an unreasonable shape or have an attitude for her to have worth.

I remember when I was a boy, my parents allowed Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The way my brother and I played with them was that we worked as a team and humiliated Shredder. We never killed him, only ridiculed him. However, they disallowed Power Rangers, since we tended to fight each other. After one rather violent playtime in the back yard when my brother got hurt, Power Rangers disappeared forever. So I don't think it's the dolls themselves (boys hate it when their "action figures" are described as dolls, but that's what they are) that cause problems, it's the way the children use them. We'll have to just observe her with various toys and see what will benefit her and what will not.

BTW, my brother and I loved Johnny Quest when we were kids. We even had a rather intellectually challenging computer game called "Cover-up at Roswell" or something like that. It included a Mancala mini-game, and my brother and I played it so much my parents bought us a real set. No, it wasn’t always accurate with the facts, but they did serve as talking points with my parents, and we learned a lot just watching that show. One of the best in children's programming, in my opinion.


American Girl dolls are beautiful and come with story books in which the doll plays her part in American history. If I had a daughter I would have had no problem buying one of these dolls for her. But they are expensive. Maybe a good Christmas or birthday gift.
http://www.americangirl.com/

Several of the little girls in our parish bring these dolls to church with them. They even put tiny icons in their hands on Orthodox Sunday. It was so precious. One mom told me her two twin daughters baptize these dolls and play imaginary Sunday school with them at home.

I agree with your thoughts about avoiding TV while they are young. You can always rent DVDs for special nights. Below are my recommendations for DVDs. The adventures of Madeleine are wonderful for little girls. She is the tough, yet feminine little French orphan girl from the story books. The Curious George movie and cartoons are appealing to everyone (my favorite!). Your little girl will probably love the stories of Arthur and his friends. Most of my friends with little girls loved Thomas the Tank Engine stories and DVDs. My children also enjoyed many of the Veggie Tale DVD and stories.
When she gets a little older public television has had some really good shows for kids. The Tales of Redwall, Wishbone, Clifford the Big Red Dog, Noddy, to name a few of our favorites.

As your daughter grows up I would suggest looking at the Lands End Kids catalog. This the only reliable source of little girl clothing that still allows little girls to look like little girls and not seductive Lolitas. You could see if your local Sears sells Lands End clothing in their store as they do in California. We can even order their clothing in the store without incurring  shipping charges and the clothing will be shipped to your home.
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« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2007, 01:04:58 PM »

^ We have been looking into the American Girls. Probably won't need anything of the sort for a couple of years, but my parents have already expressed interest in buying one when Caitlin's ready.

Agreed on the public TV. It's just about all we watch, when we actually do (it's rare; maybe an hour or so a week, and maybe a movie or two). I remember some good shows when I was young; Thomas was around--glad to see it still is. I loved that show when I was about six or so. I've seen the Arthur show, too, a couple of times, and also Clifford. Both of those look rather good. I didn't know there was a Curious George show, but if it's as good as the books, I'm sure she'll enjoy it. We'll have to consider what's on in a couple of years; in the meantime, I'd rather stay away from it entirely. She'll have plenty of non-pixelated things to explore.

Our Sears does sell Land's End, and they order and ship free, too. I've bought several shirts from them, all very good quality. The shirts were a little expensive, but they've lasted very well--the first one I bought in college and it still looks brand new about 4 years later. Not sure about prices for children's clothing; we'll have to look into it. I want her to have good clothes, but I can't pay a fortune since she'll grow out of them rather quickly.
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« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2007, 01:15:06 PM »

^ We have been looking into the American Girls. Probably won't need anything of the sort for a couple of years, but my parents have already expressed interest in buying one when Caitlin's ready.

Agreed on the public TV. It's just about all we watch, when we actually do (it's rare; maybe an hour or so a week, and maybe a movie or two). I remember some good shows when I was young; Thomas was around--glad to see it still is. I loved that show when I was about six or so. I've seen the Arthur show, too, a couple of times, and also Clifford. Both of those look rather good. I didn't know there was a Curious George show, but if it's as good as the books, I'm sure she'll enjoy it. We'll have to consider what's on in a couple of years; in the meantime, I'd rather stay away from it entirely. She'll have plenty of non-pixelated things to explore.

Our Sears does sell Land's End, and they order and ship free, too. I've bought several shirts from them, all very good quality. The shirts were a little expensive, but they've lasted very well--the first one I bought in college and it still looks brand new about 4 years later. Not sure about prices for children's clothing; we'll have to look into it. I want her to have good clothes, but I can't pay a fortune since she'll grow out of them rather quickly.

Check their website for clearance items. The prices are usually great. You probably don't need to worry about her baby clothing but when she starts school you might want to take a look at their catalog. I always buy clothes on the large size for my kids so they can wear them for at least six months to a year depending on growth spurts.
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« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2007, 01:47:56 PM »

I found a well-written and interesting article about children's entertainment here. I've been doing some thinking about this recently as we are selecting my daughter's first books. Those of you who have young daughters especially, to what extent does the article hit on truth? And what have you found to allow your children to participate in their culture while still protecting them from harm?

Insipidness : very true, though I go further than the author. I won't settle for insipidness just because it teaches something good. After all, it will still teach insipdness (which is a crime against civilization, IMHO.) We're also trying to teach our children what classifies as art, what is good, what isn't. He's absolutely right about protecting small children from electronic media altogether - they don't need it. (As for Barney - one has to wonder what sort of end product the 'Yale researchers' are going for. I'm guessing more 'production units' for their fry pits and 'democracy spreading teams'?)

Brattiness : that is one much harder to escape from, I think. Most of the examples he gives are of media that was created for adult audiences. That some feed such material to their children probably has more to do with confusion over 'cartoons just being a kid's medium'. Its the same kind of idiot, I think, that would give their under-12 year old Dark Horse comics.

Princess-ness : he's spot on, and while its all pervasive - one can see the end product on shows like Bridezilla or My Super Sweet 16. If it is left unchecked, I think it will only lead to more megalomanic and psychopathic individuals running around. Sometimes, giving them a hero who milks goats for a living could prove a wise investment in their future character...

Stereo-typing : yes, I think he is right. My wife isn't so worried about it, as she believes that those stereotyped images in past media aren't reinforced in the society around us, so that modern children aren't even likely to realize what those past images are portraying or implying. There has to be an active context in the society around them, or someone specifically teaching the kids to be be insensitive or bigots. My perspective, however, is a little different - I think images are so fundamental to human thought, that insensitive images become a 'ticking time bomb' - at some point in the future, a connection will be made (consciously, or worse - unconsciously). If that connection is there between living people and derogatory images, then action is likely also to be taken. I'm particularly concerned about stereo-typical images connected with some of the other '7 sins' he lists: such as violence. In such a case, trauma (such as over-exposure to violence) could then be linked with stereotypical images of 'people who don't look like us'. I imagine just such a process is what has contributed to continued cycles of violence.

Violence : I agree with Gerard Jones more than the author - as does my wife. She has noted that sexual differences in the brain predispose male children to aggressive behavior. She has examples of researchers who tried to raise their male children as 'pacifist' and 'demasculinized'; only to have those same children play-fighting with Raggedy Anne as a makeshift weapon. With toy guns, I think it is important to engage in play with children using toy guns - to learn fundamental rules : don't point your gun at people, etc. Having children of both sexes, I know at a certain age, our unsocialized male toddler decided he now wanted to wrestle: everything. It came out of a good children's program that he is now addicted to. One character (with which he shares a name) is depicted as quite cantankerous on the show. He picked up the attitude from the character, and started acting 'grumpy' and wanting to 'fight'. Contrary to the advice of some folk, I engaged him in the 'fight', and gently put him in a submissive position with the statement "I win". My purpose for doing so was borne out - now, if asked, "Do you want to fight?" his answer is "No, its not nice." (Pointing out, it was done only in the context of his aggression - otherwise, he would have learned a false lesson - to cave in to force. Rather, we reinforce the notion to respect authority, but resist force.)  However, graphic images of violence occurring to characters which a child is likely to empathize with: that will produce trauma! Better to wait for that later (like, after they've dealt with deaths in the family, etc.)

Vulgarity and Sluttiness : I agree with the author on every point. My children have been reinforced with realistic body image, morals (rather than moralism), and a sense of propriety normative for our society. We never had to teach them 'Bratz are bad'. Strangely enough, we went to a public event, and my 6 year old daughter was given a 'Bratz'. Her reaction was to break out in tears - "Take it away! I'm not supposed to have this, its a bad toy!" Of course, its still the reaction of a child (it takes awhile to teach manners), but the point is - we never told her 'Bratz are bad, you aren't supposed to have them'. She simply responded to the disharmonious object which ran contrary to goodness.

I'm surprised he didn't have another commandment for 'Group Think', herd behavior... another thing I don't like (particularly about Barney), is that I think it predisposes children to a certain type of thought (or non-thought) that makes them particularly vulnerable throughout life to cults, thought control, political manipulation and peer pressure. Part of our goals are to develop independent thought in our children, and ability to reason, and ability to say no.
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« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2007, 02:14:21 PM »

I'm surprised he didn't have another commandment for 'Group Think', herd behavior... another thing I don't like (particularly about Barney), is that I think it predisposes children to a certain type of thought (or non-thought) that makes them particularly vulnerable throughout life to cults, thought control, political manipulation and peer pressure. Part of our goals are to develop independent thought in our children, and ability to reason, and ability to say no.
All your points were good, but I liked this one especially. I'm reminded of the scene in the Life of Brian in which Brian's mother attempts to exhort the crowd gathered outside her house to think for themselves, and they all respond in unison: "Yes. We will think for ourselves." Being a teacher, I see all kinds of activities designed to encourage groupthink--none of which I use. I teach critical thinking instead.
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« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2007, 11:11:12 AM »

This is an article on a new study that shows that babies who watch television, including Baby Einstein-type videos, actually learn more slowly than other babies do. The researchers recommend spending time with the baby instead.

Hmm. Seems like we were talking about something like this yesterday....
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« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2007, 11:33:29 AM »

This is an article on a new study that shows that babies who watch television, including Baby Einstein-type videos, actually learn more slowly than other babies do. The researchers recommend spending time with the baby instead.

Hmm. Seems like we were talking about something like this yesterday....

If a baby is spending an hour a day watching TV, then that is one less hour of interaction with mom or dad. Nothing can replace that relationship as the best way for a baby to learn. One time I was startled when my youngest, at 2 1/2 years, recited every word to me from One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish as I drove him home from a Mommy and Me class. We had read the story to him mulitple times over the course of a month or two and he had memorized it.
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« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2007, 12:07:37 PM »

I very strongly agree with the above posts. My wife and I have some friends who have small children (1.5 - 2 y.o.) and do not talk with them at all. They say, well, what can we do, he/she is just blabbering something, we don't understand him/her, so what's the point, let him/her watch "Barney." Sad I think that's a total disaster. I don't mean to brag, but when our daughter was 10-11 months old, we spent hours with her every day reading to her aloud, naming things (toys, pictures of animals, etc.) and asking her to repeat, etc. This continued when she was 1, 1.5, 2, with increasing content of what was read, and with her increased participation. Of course, that was a long time ago (mid-1980's) and in the technologically backward former USSR; but we are convinced that reading to our daughter and talking with her, interacting with her was absolutely crucial to how she turned to be.
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« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2007, 09:48:15 AM »

I thought that he essay was, on the whole, well written.  I'll try to say more, but I have some catching up to do here and I need to get ready for church.

Ebor
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« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2007, 04:13:41 PM »

One time I was startled when my youngest, at 2 1/2 years, recited every word to me from One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish as I drove him home from a Mommy and Me class. We had read the story to him mulitple times over the course of a month or two and he had memorized it.

It's amazing, the things kids can do.  My mom was terribly impressed when I called my older sister a "despicable woman" when I was three.  (She didn't know I had picked that up from Daffy Duck.)
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« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2007, 04:19:09 PM »

My wife and I have some friends who have small children (1.5 - 2 y.o.) and do not talk with them at all. They say, well, what can we do, he/she is just blabbering something, we don't understand him/her, so what's the point, let him/her watch "Barney." Sad I think that's a total disaster.

I've had friends who have said the same and the reason the kids don't speak intelligibly is partly physical development as they're learning to use the organs of speech but it's also because they're trying to reproduce the sounds they hear.  When children hear adult speech patterns, they try to mimic them and I'm all for talking directly to children with clear, adult speech so they can learn to speak correctly.  My mother-in-law gave us a kit on baby sign language to help us understand Caitlin when she can't always speak clearly.  There are all sorts of stories of children using simple sign language to tell when they're hungry or need a diaper change or aren't feeling well.  That sounds much better to me that trying to decipher what all the crying is about.

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« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2007, 04:25:16 PM »

It's amazing, the things kids can do.  My mom was terribly impressed when I called my older sister a "despicable woman" when I was three.  (She didn't know I had picked that up from Daffy Duck.)

When our daughter was about 1.5 y.o., she would very seriously and emotionally correct us when we took a walk in the park with her in winter, and one of us (my wife or her mom or me) would say that it was "cold." Once she would hear the word "cold," she would immediately shout," seventeen degwees below zewo!!!" (Because she heard it on the radio, and just could not stand our lack of precision in this matter.) And then, when we would come back home and take off her winter coat, she would jump on her bed and throw punches like a boxer, saying, "degwees below zewo, take THAT! and THAT! and THAT!" - apparently showing us her strong disapproval of those bad, cold "degwees."

Also, those were Gorbachev's Perestroika years, so she could, every now and then, astonish as by pointing at some face on TV and ask, very loudly, in a demanding tone: "Mom, is it Gorbachev?" - and when mom said no, she would immediately conclude, also loudly and in the tone that tolerated no objections, "Then it has to be be Reagan."  Grin
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« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2007, 10:22:31 PM »

It's amazing, the things kids can do.  My mom was terribly impressed when I called my older sister a "despicable woman" when I was three.  (She didn't know I had picked that up from Daffy Duck.)
I remember my Grandma Jane (of blessed memory) relating to me a relevant anecdote of something she did on her second birthday.  For her birthday party, her mother (my great grandmother) brought out of the oven a cake that had become quite lopsided during the baking process.  My grandma started bawling as only a 2-year-old can do and cried out, "Mommy, my cake's all shot to hell!"  Great-grandma Pauline had no idea where her young daughter picked up such impressive language. Embarrassed
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« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2007, 04:32:53 PM »

It's amazing, the things kids can do.  My mom was terribly impressed when I called my older sister a "despicable woman" when I was three.  (She didn't know I had picked that up from Daffy Duck.)

When our oldest (now a towering 14 y.o. with huge feet) was about 2.5 or 3 we would watch "Bill Nye the Science Guy" together.  He liked it even if he didn't understand the finer points.  One day we were in the car and it started to rain heavily.  Suddenly from the backseat I hear a little voice saying "Troposphere.  We in Troposphere." 
 Cheesy

He also had a case of what some friends called the "Your child is a Martian" stage in which they say things that have meaning to *them* but parents have no clue.  One incident was at the dinner table, again at about 3 or so.  I told him "You should eat your potatoes. Try that bit."  He said "No.  That one is dangerous.  I'll eat this one."

Dangerous potatoes??!?

Ebor
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« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2007, 04:46:05 PM »

I very strongly agree with the above posts. My wife and I have some friends who have small children (1.5 - 2 y.o.) and do not talk with them at all. They say, well, what can we do, he/she is just blabbering something, we don't understand him/her.

We've always talked to our children in "grown-up" speech, as well as read to them from a very early age. One of our oldest's first hundred words was "Backhoe" and I think another was "dinosaur".   This lead to a comment from our oldest boy's first grade teacher one day when we were picking him up and his sister (age 3) was talking to her at length.  She said that "She is very articulate for her age."  I figured that when other people say that it means "She could talk the ears off a mule" but from a teacher it's a compliment.  Cheesy 

Our youngest still needs speech therapy because of his Down Syndrome, but he's trying hard to get more sounds and words out and once he's able to speak clearly I figure that with the three of them going on the parents won't be able to get a word in edgewise.  Wink

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« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2007, 05:09:56 PM »

Also, those were Gorbachev's Perestroika years, so she could, every now and then, astonish as by pointing at some face on TV and ask, very loudly, in a demanding tone: "Mom, is it Gorbachev?" - and when mom said no, she would immediately conclude, also loudly and in the tone that tolerated no objections, "Then it has to be be Reagan."  Grin

That's hilarious!  Kids pick up a lot more than adults think they can.  All the more reason to keep them away from Barney.   Wink
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« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2007, 05:13:19 PM »

I remember my Grandma Jane (of blessed memory) relating to me a relevant anecdote of something she did on her second birthday.  For her birthday party, her mother (my great grandmother) brought out of the oven a cake that had become quite lopsided during the baking process.  My grandma started bawling as only a 2-year-old can do and cried out, "Mommy, my cake's all shot to hell!"  Great-grandma Pauline had no idea where her young daughter picked up such impressive language. Embarrassed

LOL!
My brother took great pains in teaching me all sorts of impressive language like that.  He's a spiteful cuss. 
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« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2007, 05:15:32 PM »

When our oldest (now a towering 14 y.o. with huge feet) was about 2.5 or 3 we would watch "Bill Nye the Science Guy" together.  He liked it even if he didn't understand the finer points.  One day we were in the car and it started to rain heavily.  Suddenly from the backseat I hear a little voice saying "Troposphere.  We in Troposphere." 
 Cheesy


I'm impressed he could even say troposphere!
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« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2007, 12:57:15 AM »

LOL!
My brother took great pains in teaching me all sorts of impressive language like that. 
I like to teach my nephew ebonics because my brother...well, he's a bit of a redneck who, let's just say, doesn't like ebonics. At all. Fa'shizzle!
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« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2007, 01:01:41 AM »

Dangerous potatoes??!?
Well, launched from a stretch of PVC pipe called a potato cannon, I guess they can be.  (Just don't let your teenage son see these videos.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpAJOPzKK-M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbULgsPBX6Q
« Last Edit: August 17, 2007, 01:46:46 AM by PeterTheAleut » Logged
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« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2007, 01:09:47 PM »

Quote
Well, launched from a stretch of PVC pipe called a potato cannon, I guess they can be.  (Just don't let your teenage son see these videos.)

Ever seen one of those baby's in action?  Caused a comotion in the Quad when I was in College.  Seems that someone shot one off at the dorms, and the "Dangerous Potato" knocked afew bricks out of the side of the building, in a girl's room which caused them to think that we had entered WW3, and soon there were about ten cop cars alongside every University policeman invading the place to see whodunit.  I saw the damage the next day.  IF you build one, don't aim it at anything living, Pease! Wink
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