OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 17, 2014, 09:40:18 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Female Monastery  (Read 2961 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
prodromas
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Under the Green Pope
Posts: 1,239

Greek Orthodox


« on: August 05, 2007, 03:01:02 AM »

At a Female Monastery who serves communion? do they get a priest to come or do they go to a church with a priest and if so then what do they do on a day to day basis like with daily vespers and the like?
Logged

The sins I don't commit are largely due to the weakness of my limbs.

1915-1923 Հայոց Ցեղասպանութիւն ,never again,
ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܐܬܘܪܝܐ 1920-1914, never again,
השואה  1933-1945, never again,
(1914-1923) Ελληνική Γενοκτονία, never again
ozgeorge
I'll take you for who you are if you take me for everything.
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Oecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the New Rome, the Great Church of Christ.
Posts: 16,382


My plans for retirement.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2007, 03:45:12 AM »

A priest serves the Liturgy and administers Communion in a convent.
I go to Confession at a Greek Orthodox Convent in Sydney which is a metochion (dependency) of a larger convent in northern New South Wales. They were both founded by my current Spiritual Father. The only other Convent I have attended Liturgy in was in Souroti in Halkidiki (those familiar with Greece will recognise the name "Souroti" as a brand of excellent bottled spring water which comes from there). Elder Paisios founded this Convent and is buried there (which is why I went to visit it).
Logged

If you're living a happy life as a Christian, you're doing something wrong.
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,793



« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2007, 07:27:38 PM »

In  a female monastery, in the absence of a priest, they will do daily services like the hours in the  "without a priest" format. The Mother Abbess presides over these services and is seen by all the female monastics as their spiritual mother. They must have a priest to perform sacarments and that priest is usually attached to  the monastery for that purpose or sent to the monastery from other parts of the diocese. he does not reside in the monastery.

Thomas
« Last Edit: August 16, 2007, 09:43:06 AM by Thomas » Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
prodromas
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Under the Green Pope
Posts: 1,239

Greek Orthodox


« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2007, 08:19:45 PM »

Thanks Thomas thats the sort of answer I meant, my questions are always worded incorrectly and I find it hard to get an answer to the actual question I ask! Do the female monastics confess to the spiritual mother or the priest?
Logged

The sins I don't commit are largely due to the weakness of my limbs.

1915-1923 Հայոց Ցեղասպանութիւն ,never again,
ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܐܬܘܪܝܐ 1920-1914, never again,
השואה  1933-1945, never again,
(1914-1923) Ελληνική Γενοκτονία, never again
arimethea
Getting too old for this
Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Holy Catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Patriarchate of Antioch
Posts: 2,968


Does anyone really care what you think?


« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2007, 08:52:20 PM »

Do the female monastics confess to the spiritual mother or the priest?
Both.
Logged

Joseph
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,364


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2007, 12:01:14 AM »

They can confess to their spiritual mother, and then the priest comes in and does the absolution prayer, and takes care of any other things that may have been left out, or whatever, etc. 

I have come accross this scenario before (above)...
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Trudy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2007, 10:35:57 PM »

Hi everyone.

I'm not sure this is the right place to put this question.  If not, would the moderator please move it to the appropriate topic forum?  Thanks!   Grin

Monastics are called to pray for the world.  As someone explained to me, "that is their job."  Correct?

What else was said was, "Monastics sometimes suffer for the world."  My question is...why?  Christ already suffered for the world.  Why would a monastic need to suffer too?  Or for that matter, again?

I did ask my priest today but he needed to leave before really formulating and explaining the answer.  He said that the answer is basically theological. 

Would someone please help me understand this concept?  It is very important to me to personally due to my monastic spiritual big brother and his own sufferings.

With humble thanks,
Athanasia (Trudy)
Logged

He has shown you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God?  Micah 6:8
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2007, 11:20:43 PM »

Hi everyone.

I'm not sure this is the right place to put this question.  If not, would the moderator please move it to the appropriate topic forum?  Thanks!   Grin

Monastics are called to pray for the world.  As someone explained to me, "that is their job."  Correct?

What else was said was, "Monastics sometimes suffer for the world."  My question is...why?  Christ already suffered for the world.  Why would a monastic need to suffer too?  Or for that matter, again?

I did ask my priest today but he needed to leave before really formulating and explaining the answer.  He said that the answer is basically theological. 

Would someone please help me understand this concept?  It is very important to me to personally due to my monastic spiritual big brother and his own sufferings.

With humble thanks,
Athanasia (Trudy)

When any of us suffer, we participate in Christ's suffering if we offer it up to Him. Even St. Paul speaks of completing what is lacking in Christ's suffering. I think you have to take that as "in a manner of speaking" on Paul's part. Christ's sacrifice was perfect.

Christ bore the ultimate suffering for say, you best friend. But don't you suffer for her when you bear an insult or unkindness from her, or take time to pray fer her, or share her concerns and sufferings and suffer with her?
In the same way, monastics do this for the world. They take it upon themselves specifically and consciously. Mpst f us are too busy and have to many pressing worldly concerns to do this. A priest suffers for his parish. But monastics do it for the world.

I hope this helps.
Logged
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2007, 11:23:26 PM »

Hi everyone.

I'm not sure this is the right place to put this question.  If not, would the moderator please move it to the appropriate topic forum?  Thanks!   Grin

Monastics are called to pray for the world.  As someone explained to me, "that is their job."  Correct?

What else was said was, "Monastics sometimes suffer for the world."  My question is...why?  Christ already suffered for the world.  Why would a monastic need to suffer too?  Or for that matter, again?

I did ask my priest today but he needed to leave before really formulating and explaining the answer.  He said that the answer is basically theological. 

Would someone please help me understand this concept?  It is very important to me to personally due to my monastic spiritual big brother and his own sufferings.

With humble thanks,
Athanasia (Trudy)

When any of us suffer, we participate in Christ's suffering if we offer it up to Him. Even St. Paul speaks of completing what is lacking in Christ's suffering. I think you have to take that as "in a manner of speaking" on Paul's part. Christ's sacrifice was perfect.

Here is a little example:
Christ bore the ultimate suffering for say, you best friend. But don't you suffer for her when you bear an insult or unkindness from her, or take time to pray for her, or share her concerns and sufferings and thereby suffer with her?
In the same way, monastics do this for the world. They take it upon themselves specifically and consciously. Most of us are too busy and have to many pressing worldly concerns to do this. A priest suffers for his parish. But monastics do it for the world.

I hope this helps.
Logged
Gregorios
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2007, 06:32:35 AM »

I may be mistaken but the priest serves as a witness to confession. Christ gives absolution. In my expierence it is only the Latin church( Roman Catholic) that give that privelige to the priests. I have been wrong in the past how ever, and if I have erred I ask forgiveness.
Logged
serb1389
Lord, remember me when you come into your Kingdom!
Global Moderator
Merarches
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of San Francisco
Posts: 8,364


Michał Kalina's biggest fan

FrNPantic
WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2007, 10:51:30 AM »

Yes I also believe that this is technically the way it works for Orthodox. 

However, the priest does need to read the prayer because they are the intermediaries between us and God...

So its a little bit more involved than just Christ giving absolution.  It is absolution of Christ THROUGH the priest...

This is the way I have understood it...
Logged

I got nothing.
I forgot the maps
March 27th and May 30th 2010 were my Ordination dates, please forgive everything before that
Trudy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2007, 11:09:45 AM »

When any of us suffer, we participate in Christ's suffering if we offer it up to Him. Even St. Paul speaks of completing what is lacking in Christ's suffering. I think you have to take that as "in a manner of speaking" on Paul's part. Christ's sacrifice was perfect.

Here is a little example:
Christ bore the ultimate suffering for say, you best friend. But don't you suffer for her when you bear an insult or unkindness from her, or take time to pray for her, or share her concerns and sufferings and thereby suffer with her?

In the same way, monastics do this for the world. They take it upon themselves specifically and consciously. Most of us are too busy and have to many pressing worldly concerns to do this. A priest suffers for his parish. But monastics do it for the world.

I hope this helps.
Yes, this does help and prompts more questions.   Smiley

How can we complete what is lacking in Christ when it comes to suffering?  He is God! 

Does the monastic act as an intermediary when it comes to suffering such as a priest does in confession? 

For what it is worth, I am a convert (former RC to Protestant [Baptist]).  I think my Protestant understandings (read that as baggage  Grin) is getting in the way.  I have read Romans 8 and have never really grasped what St. Paul is saying.

Please don't give up on me!  I truly want to be able to understand this in my heart.

Humbly, Athanasia (Trudy)

Logged

He has shown you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God?  Micah 6:8
BrotherAidan
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 1,568

OC.net


« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2007, 11:34:09 PM »

Yes, this does help and prompts more questions.   Smiley

How can we complete what is lacking in Christ when it comes to suffering?  He is God! 

Does the monastic act as an intermediary when it comes to suffering such as a priest does in confession? 

For what it is worth, I am a convert (former RC to Protestant [Baptist]).  I think my Protestant understandings (read that as baggage  Grin) is getting in the way.  I have read Romans 8 and have never really grasped what St. Paul is saying.

Please don't give up on me!  I truly want to be able to understand this in my heart.

Humbly, Athanasia (Trudy)


Okay, one by one: I don't think cosmically we can complete anything in Christ's suffering in regard to the events from the Last Supper to his being placed in a tomb, dead. That was a perfect offering and sacrifice. Nor do I believe there was or is anything lacking in His suffering to be completed. Does that put me at odds with St. Paul? Not really. I think, again, he was saying this "as a manner of speaking"

There is the sense in which Christ is present in the Church; after all the Church is the Body of Christ. In that sense our sufferings are His sufferings. I think that is the sense Paul meant this. To the extent the Body of Christ and its individual members are called to suffer, Christ suffers with us. In that sense His suffering is not complete until His return and we are helping to complete it the on-going suffering of Christ in and with His Church. That is the only sense I can imagine St. Paul's comment.

Yes, I think the monastic is acting as intermediary - suffering for the world in prayer for the world; spending time attending to ALL the services and hours of prayer on behalf of the Church and the world; living simply and fasting on behalf of the world; practicing ascetic discipline to become examples of theosis for all of us, Christian and pagan. Battling demons in prayer is suffering, not just for the monastic's own salvation but for the world too. It is a sacrifice and a suffering borne of love - love for God and love for the world. The monastic takes this on willingly for Christ's sake.

I wouldn't attempt an exposition of Romans 8, but your are correct that the protestant baggage (for example, the tendencty to view Christ's suffering as a strictly legal transaction of God puninshing sin in Christ and forgiving it in anyone who receies Christ, kind of makes the whole affair a "done deal." Any other understanding seems to be re-opening the deal or saying it wasn't enough). But if you look at the Incarnation as the beginning of the salvific event and the re-uniting of human nature with the divine, and if you see Christ's suffering as conquering sin and death and defeating Satan and that being a Christian is being called to participate in the uniting of our humanity with God and participating in that victory with Christ and being joined to God and once again to become the image and likeness of God, then these things begin to make a little more sense.

Check out these links for some helpful books
http://www.conciliarpress.com/index.php?p=product&id=66&parent=47

http://www.conciliarpress.com/index.php?p=product&id=123&parent=45

http://www.conciliarpress.com/index.php?p=product&id=362&parent=17

These books and booklets can help you understand and come to grips with some basic premises of Orthodoxy.
Logged
observer
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 546

Vivre die Raznitsa!


« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2007, 03:48:37 PM »

If any man would come after Me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow Me.  The Cross is a symbol of  victory through suffering.  There is no salvation without suffering etc.   Matushka Antonia (Kaveshnikova) took on the suffering of the Russian people as she labored in camps and psychiatric hospitals for 40 years.  She was given the special gift to help those suffering from mental crises.
Logged

Thou shalt not prefer one thing to another (Law of Liberalism)
Tags: Monastery 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.073 seconds with 41 queries.