Author Topic: Hymn question  (Read 2547 times)

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Offline Seekingthetruth

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Hymn question
« on: July 19, 2007, 09:40:57 PM »
I attended an Antiochian Liturgy recently and fell in love with 2 hymns. The first is the Cherubic Hymn and the second is one which I would like to learn the name of. But first the Cherubic hymn....I had heard various recordings but the one I heard that Sunday was foreign to me. Is their a common tone that it's sung in? The one I heard, and love, was set to this melody. (See video) Is it normally sung like this? Is there a recording that can be found online?
Here's a video set to the melody: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Emcry2SU4vI

I do not know the name of the second hymn, but the words where the prayers before communion.

The words are such
Quote
Of thy mystical supper, O Son of God, accept me today as a communicant, for I will not speak of thy mystery to thine enemies, neither will I give thee a kiss as did Judas, but like the thief will I confess thee, remember me, O Lord, in thy kingdom. Not unto judgment nor unto condemnation be my partaking of thy holy Mysteries, O Lord, but unto healing of soul and body.

Could anyone please provide it's name, and maybe a recording.

Thanks!
"The Orthodox Church is evangelical, but not Protestant. It is orthodox, but not Jewish. It is catholic, but not Roman. It isn't non-denominational - it is pre-denominational. It has believed, taught, preserved, defended and died for the Faith of the Apostles since the Day of Pentecost."

Offline Rowan

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2007, 09:47:50 PM »
The Cherubic Hymn is one of my favorites! I go to an Antiochian mission, and that's the only way I've heard it sung.

My service book just refers to the latter as "A Communion Hymn".

I'm a catechumen as well!

« Last Edit: July 19, 2007, 09:49:27 PM by Rowan »
Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things. ~Philippians 4:8; St Paul

Offline Seekingthetruth

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2007, 09:54:07 PM »
That's awesome! I wish I could regularly attend an Antiochian parish! Those "service books" are wonderful too. If I'm not mistaken, it's online now!
http://www.sspeterpaul.org/priest.html
"The Orthodox Church is evangelical, but not Protestant. It is orthodox, but not Jewish. It is catholic, but not Roman. It isn't non-denominational - it is pre-denominational. It has believed, taught, preserved, defended and died for the Faith of the Apostles since the Day of Pentecost."

Offline Rowan

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2007, 10:02:07 PM »
Thanks for the link! I never could find all that in one place before. :)

It's been a real blessing being able to attend regularly. My prayers that you will be able to do the same!
Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things. ~Philippians 4:8; St Paul

Offline Veniamin

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2007, 10:03:05 PM »
I attended an Antiochian Liturgy recently and fell in love with 2 hymns. The first is the Cherubic Hymn and the second is one which I would like to learn the name of. But first the Cherubic hymn....I had heard various recordings but the one I heard that Sunday was foreign to me. Is their a common tone that it's sung in? The one I heard, and love, was set to this melody. (See video) Is it normally sung like this? Is there a recording that can be found online?
Here's a video set to the melody: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Emcry2SU4vI

I'm familiar with that one, as it's one of seven or eight settings for it that we use at my parish.  If I can remember, I'll look it up in the choir books and see who did the arrangement.
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Offline Seekingthetruth

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2007, 10:07:56 PM »
Thanks! :)
"The Orthodox Church is evangelical, but not Protestant. It is orthodox, but not Jewish. It is catholic, but not Roman. It isn't non-denominational - it is pre-denominational. It has believed, taught, preserved, defended and died for the Faith of the Apostles since the Day of Pentecost."

Offline Tamara

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2007, 10:17:28 PM »
I attended an Antiochian Liturgy recently and fell in love with 2 hymns. The first is the Cherubic Hymn and the second is one which I would like to learn the name of. But first the Cherubic hymn....I had heard various recordings but the one I heard that Sunday was foreign to me. Is their a common tone that it's sung in? The one I heard, and love, was set to this melody. (See video) Is it normally sung like this? Is there a recording that can be found online?
Here's a video set to the melody: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Emcry2SU4vI

I do not know the name of the second hymn, but the words where the prayers before communion.

The words are such
Could anyone please provide it's name, and maybe a recording.

Thanks!

There are many versions of the Cherubimic Hymn.
Some are in Byzantine tone and others are in Slavonic tone like the one you love.
I believe this is the Hymn of the Cherubim by Dmitri Bortniansky.
The second hymn is a Communion hymn and I believe the name of the hymn is Of Thy Mystic Supper
I don't know if it is available online as an mp3 file. We usually sing this one for Presanctified Liturgy during Lent.

Offline arimethea

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2007, 10:19:09 PM »
I attended an Antiochian Liturgy recently and fell in love with 2 hymns. The first is the Cherubic Hymn and the second is one which I would like to learn the name of. But first the Cherubic hymn....I had heard various recordings but the one I heard that Sunday was foreign to me. Is their a common tone that it's sung in? The one I heard, and love, was set to this melody. (See video) Is it normally sung like this? Is there a recording that can be found online?
Here's a video set to the melody: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Emcry2SU4vI
The music for the recording is here http://www.antiochian.org/sacredmusic/pdf/13B%20Cherubic%20Hymn-Bortniansky-5.pdf It is the 5th Cherubic Hymn done by Dmitri S. Bortniansky in the first part of the 1800's.

The Cherubic Hymn has many settings. Most of the Russian composers did at least a couple of settings. In Byzantine music this is done in a Papadiac setting any of the 8 tones and in some of the special tones like Proto-Varies (which combines characteristics of Tone 1 and Tone 7). 

I do not know the name of the second hymn, but the words where the prayers before communion.
This is the Cherubic Hymn and Communion Hymn on Holy Thursday. It is also the last part of the prayers said before communion. The version you heard was most likely the one composed by Frederick Karam in Tone 8 since that is the most popular arrangement done in Antiochian parishes. There is a recording of the more tradional Plagal 2 version on the Boston Byzantine Choir's Mystical Supper CD.
Joseph

Offline Seekingthetruth

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2007, 10:57:38 PM »
Wonderful! I thank you, one and all!

I found "Of thy mystical supper" here: http://www.holy-trinity.org/multimedia/holyweek/index.html
"The Orthodox Church is evangelical, but not Protestant. It is orthodox, but not Jewish. It is catholic, but not Roman. It isn't non-denominational - it is pre-denominational. It has believed, taught, preserved, defended and died for the Faith of the Apostles since the Day of Pentecost."

Offline ytterbiumanalyst

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2007, 09:02:02 AM »
We sing "Of thy mystical supper" occasionally; as far as I know, it's just St. John Crystostom's pre-communion prayer in whatever tone is being sung that day. We usually sing it in our regular Tone 6.
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Offline recent convert

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2007, 09:32:28 AM »
Here is a printed download of the Liturgy of St John Chrysostom from an Antiochian Orthodox church of his namesake in York, Pa.    http://www.orthodoxyork.org/liturgy.html
Antiochian OC N.A.

Offline Orthodox11

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2007, 10:18:19 PM »
We sing "Of thy mystical supper" occasionally; as far as I know, it's just St. John Crystostom's pre-communion prayer

My prayer book attributes it to St. Simon Metaphrastes

Offline ytterbiumanalyst

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Re: Hymn question
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2007, 03:52:29 PM »
Thank you for the information.

Shouldn't be any surprise, though, that the theology of two saints should be so similar.
"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens