Author Topic: Greek songs  (Read 4604 times)

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Offline Anastasios

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Greek songs
« on: June 18, 2007, 02:03:01 PM »
Hello! I find a great help for me to learn spoken Greek is to learn song lyrics, because I can memorize the words easier and recall them, etc.

Here is a song whose tune I enjoy.  As before when I have asked about songs, if there is anything bad in any song I post, please forgive me :)  Can anyone tell me what this song means (repetitive portions removed):

Είσαι νινί ακόμα
δεν ξέρεις πως χαιδεύουνε και πως φιλούν στο στώμα

κι όμως η καρδιά σου θέλει να αγαπήσει
θέλει να πονέσει,θέλει,ναι

είσαι νινί μικρό μου
και δε μου πάει ένα μωρό να έχω στο πλευρό μου

κι όμως η καρδιά σου θέλει να δακρύσει,
θέλει να φιλήσει,ναι

κι όμως η καρδιά σου θέλει να δακρύσει,
θέλει να φιλήσει,ναι

I have a feeling it means something like "you're still a baby" but you know, not sure in what context :)

Thanks!

Anastasios
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Offline ozgeorge

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2007, 08:15:18 PM »
You got it right. Basically, the singer is rejecting the love of the one who loves them because they consider them naive in the ways of erotic love.

"You are still a babe.
You don't know how they caress and how they kiss on the mouth.

And yet your heart wants to love,
It wants to feel  pain, it wants to, yes....

You are a babe my little one
And it doesn't suit me to have a babe at my side.

And yet your heart want's to weep
Wants to kiss, yes."

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Offline Anastasios

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2007, 08:35:13 PM »
Thanks George!  I have noticed this song has been done by at least two singers. Is this a folk song that was recorded? Or is it an original composition in the folk style? The "original" singer is Efi Thodi.
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Offline ozgeorge

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2007, 08:53:50 PM »
Is this a folk song that was recorded? Or is it an original composition in the folk style?
My guess is that it is not a folk song, because "νινι" ("baby") is a very recent diminutive, rarely (if ever) used in the Diaspora. A comparison in Australian English would be "nini-pops" which refers to a child's sleep and has only recently come into use. My guess is that both "νινι" and "nini-pops" derive from the Spanish "niño/niña" ("male child/female child").
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Offline Fr. George

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2007, 07:44:06 PM »
My guess is that it is not a folk song, because "νινι" ("baby") is a very recent diminutive, rarely (if ever) used in the Diaspora.

Agreed: I've never heard it used before now!  Although, I had an easy time guessing what it could be (based on context).
« Last Edit: July 16, 2007, 07:44:27 PM by cleveland »
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Offline Nazarene

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2010, 02:45:39 PM »
Where can I find the song: Thelis na pethano, preferably for download:

http://www.greekshops.com/cd_sample_audio/624804100225/track12.mp3

I know there are a lot of renditions but I want this one.

Offline SolEX01

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2010, 05:28:55 PM »
Where can I find the song: Thelis na pethano, preferably for download:

http://www.greekshops.com/cd_sample_audio/624804100225/track12.mp3

I know there are a lot of renditions but I want this one.

If you know who sings the rendition that you like, you can search for the song by musician on iTunes, LimeWire (watch for malware), et al.   :)

Offline Nazarene

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2010, 06:08:46 AM »
Tried iTunes and it's not there, I'll give Limewire a try, thanks for the tip.

Offline Apostolos

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2012, 10:10:51 AM »
A folk song from Asia Minor, more specifically from Pergamon, called "Pergamon". The performer is Solon Lekkas.
Greek lyrics:

Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν Αϊβαλί
αχ Αϊβαλί,
Πέργαμo και Δικελί
αχ Αϊβαλί,
Πέργαμo και Δικελί

Αμάν αμάν αχ ωραία Πέργαμο
Αμάν αμάν αχ ωραία Πέργαμο
αχ Πέργαμο,
Πέργαμο δεν σε ξεχνώ
αχ Πέργαμο,
σε θυμάμαι και πονώ

Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν Πέργαμε
φεύγαμε και γιά σένα λέγαμε
αχ Πέργαμε,
φεύγαμε και λέγαμε
αχ Πέργαμε,
και γιά σένα κλαίγαμε

Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν Φωκιανοί
Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν Φωκιανοί
αχ Φωκιανοί,
η καρδιά μου σας πονεί
αχ Φωκιανοί,
η καρδιά μου σας πονεί

Αμάν αμάν αμάν Σμύρνη και Βουρλά
Αμάν αμάν αμάν Σμύρνη και Βουρλά
αχ και Βουρλά,
βγάζεις άνδρες λεβεντιά
αχ και Βουρλά,
έχεις άνδρες λεβεντιά

Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν θα στο ειπώ
Αμάν αμάν αμάν αμάν θα στο ειπώ
αχ θα στο ειπώ,
πόλη μου σε αγαπώ
αχ θα στο ειπώ,
πόλη μου σε αγαπώ

Ayvali: ancient Cydoniae, present day Turkish Ayvalik
Dikeli: ancient Pitane, present day Turkish Dikili
Phoceans: from ancient Phocaea, present day Turkish Foça
Vourla: ancient Bryoula, present day Turkish Urla

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTdgy7ZqDhE

A manes (song improvisation of the Christians of Asia Minor, to express their bitterness, struggles in life, death of loved ones, long lost loves) performed by Theodora. The instrument is called Yayli Tambur
Greek lyrics:

Θε' να 'ρθει η αυγή να σηκωθώ
βαθιά ν' αναστενάξω
τις πίκρες και τα βάσανα
μακριά να τα πετάξω

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dB7JThtKwXE
« Last Edit: December 01, 2012, 10:12:40 AM by Apostolos »
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Offline tweety234

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Re: Greek songs
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2012, 07:34:11 PM »
Hello! I find a great help for me to learn spoken Greek is to learn song lyrics, because I can memorize the words easier and recall them, etc.

Here is a song whose tune I enjoy.  As before when I have asked about songs, if there is anything bad in any song I post, please forgive me :)  Can anyone tell me what this song means (repetitive portions removed):

Είσαι νινί ακόμα
δεν ξέρεις πως χαιδεύουνε και πως φιλούν στο στώμα

κι όμως η καρδιά σου θέλει να αγαπήσει
θέλει να πονέσει,θέλει,ναι

είσαι νινί μικρό μου
και δε μου πάει ένα μωρό να έχω στο πλευρό μου

κι όμως η καρδιά σου θέλει να δακρύσει,
θέλει να φιλήσει,ναι

κι όμως η καρδιά σου θέλει να δακρύσει,
θέλει να φιλήσει,ναι

I have a feeling it means something like "you're still a baby" but you know, not sure in what context :)

Thanks!

Anastasios


I so love that one.
“God has no religion.”
― Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi