Author Topic: "HOSTAGE TO THE DEVIL" by Malachi Martin and "THE DARK SACRAMENT" by David Kiely  (Read 2014 times)

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Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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I was wondering if anyone else has read either one of these books:

Hostage to the Devil by Malachi Martin

The Dark Sacrament by David Kiely and Christina McKenna

These books deal with actual case studies of demonic possession and Catholic exorcisms. Both books are fascinating and very well written. But they are not for the faint-hearted. They are terrifying. But they reveal the reality of evil, and they show how people often unwittingly open themselves up to the demonic realm by the misuse of their volitional will.

Malachi Martin's book contains some excellent philosophy, and it demonstrates how adherance to an erroneous worldview can easily lead one into the clutches of satan. Often it is the apparently "innocent" and "good" people who by reliance upon their own reason and the cultivation of their own subjective values end up the hapless pawns of lucifer's minions.

Kiely and McKenna's book also details the subtle and deceptive descent into demonic darkness. As well, it provides insight into the unique nature, responsibility, and psychological stress of the exorcist.

I am also very curious to know if there are any books like this that are written from an Orthodox perspective. I would be very interested to read about Orthodox exorcisms.

Selam
« Last Edit: June 29, 2009, 04:45:10 AM by Gebre Menfes Kidus »
""Love is a dangerous thing. It will crush you if you trust it. But without it you can never be whole. Love crucifies, but love saves. We will either be saved together with love, or damned alone without it."    Selam, +GMK+

Offline ms.hoorah

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Yes, Martin's book, because I work in a mental health profession.  Although this book is very old, you should read "People of the Lie" by Scott Peck, M.D.  It has one chapter about exorcism (RC church). This book gives case studies that are very useful for everyone, not just mental health professionals.  It might be very informative for individuals heading to "the desert in a few week for a church meeting"........
« Last Edit: July 02, 2009, 11:22:44 PM by ms.hoorah »

Offline rakovsky

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At least when it comes to Orthodoxy, perhaps one can doubt what Fr. Martin says.

Wikipedia's entry on him reports:
Quote
Martin said concerning the three secrets of the Virgin Mary as Queen of Heaven in Fátima in 1917, she mandated the pope of 1960 to consecrate Russia to her Immaculate Heart. The Russian orthodox church would then convert back. If the mandate were not followed, devastating war in the world and destruction inside the church (The Great Apostasy) would follow.
The three secrets were given in July 1917 when Russia's government was not yet Bolshevik, ie. it was not yet a secular government that discouraged the Church. Therefore, when it mentions "convert back", it suggests it has in mind an idea that Orthodoxy left Catholicism and return to it. However, perhaps it meant reconvert to Christianity, but I am not sure.

Second, the entry says:
Quote
Pope John Paul I was murdered according to Malachi's book, Vatican: A Novel, by Jean-Marie Villot, formerly Cardinal Secretary of State under Pope Paul VI, under orders from the U.S.S.R..
This however is a strange claim. The day before Pople J.P. I's death I believe the Pope met and ate or drank with the Russian Church representative, who himself strangely died soon after that meeting. In other words, I think it was not really the Russians who were killing them.

On page 287-289 of his book "Keys of This Blood: Pope John Paul II Versus Russia", Fr. Martin appears to take a negative, patronizing tone towards Orthodoxy. He basically portrays it as phyletist ("geopolitical") and stuck in its traditions (that's ironic- Fr. Martin should know the importance of tradition), and delusional about lost grandeur. He then portrays Byzantium's and Russia's ideas about the 2nd and 3rd Rome as delusional.

I was expecting something more tolerant from Fr. Martin, unfortunately, since he also criticizes Russian Orthodoxy for being anti-papal and threatened by expansion of Papal power. In other words, he criticizes Orthodox for not being tolerant enough.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 01:48:40 AM by rakovsky »

Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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At least when it comes to Orthodoxy, perhaps one can doubt what Fr. Martin says.

Wikipedia's entry on him reports:
Quote
Martin said concerning the three secrets of the Virgin Mary as Queen of Heaven in Fátima in 1917, she mandated the pope of 1960 to consecrate Russia to her Immaculate Heart. The Russian orthodox church would then convert back. If the mandate were not followed, devastating war in the world and destruction inside the church (The Great Apostasy) would follow.
The three secrets were given in July 1917 when Russia's government was not yet Bolshevik, ie. it was not yet a secular government that discouraged the Church. Therefore, when it mentions "convert back", it suggests it has in mind an idea that Orthodoxy left Catholicism and return to it. However, perhaps it meant reconvert to Christianity, but I am not sure.

Second, the entry says:
Quote
Pope John Paul I was murdered according to Malachi's book, Vatican: A Novel, by Jean-Marie Villot, formerly Cardinal Secretary of State under Pope Paul VI, under orders from the U.S.S.R..
This however is a strange claim. The day before Pople J.P. I's death I believe the Pope met and ate or drank with the Russian Church representative, who himself strangely died soon after that meeting. In other words, I think it was not really the Russians who were killing them.

On page 287-289 of his book "Keys of This Blood: Pope John Paul II Versus Russia", Fr. Martin appears to take a negative, patronizing tone towards Orthodoxy. He basically portrays it as phyletist ("geopolitical") and stuck in its traditions (that's ironic- Fr. Martin should know the importance of tradition), and delusional about lost grandeur. He then portrays Byzantium's and Russia's ideas about the 2nd and 3rd Rome as delusional.

I was expecting something more tolerant from Fr. Martin, unfortunately, since he also criticizes Russian Orthodoxy for being anti-papal and threatened by expansion of Papal power. In other words, he criticizes Orthodox for not being tolerant enough.

No doubt he was a controversial figure. Like most authors, you have to sift the good from the bad. I've only read Hostage to the Devil, which was wonderful. I'd like to read Windswept House, which I hear is also very good. His theology may be off (after all, he was Roman Catholic), but his description of human nature, good and evil, and the importance of volitional choice is spot on in my opinion.


Selam
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 02:01:34 AM by Gebre Menfes Kidus »
""Love is a dangerous thing. It will crush you if you trust it. But without it you can never be whole. Love crucifies, but love saves. We will either be saved together with love, or damned alone without it."    Selam, +GMK+

Offline hecma925

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I did read Hostage to the Devil.  Good reccommendations to look up!
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