OrthodoxChristianity.net
August 23, 2014, 03:17:34 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Telling Friends of Conversion & a Relative  (Read 2374 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Didymus
Peace and grace.
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: HG Coptic Bishop Anba Daniel of Sydney
Posts: 563


St. Thomas Didymus the Apostle of India


« on: May 20, 2007, 01:16:07 PM »

Please pray that those friends I am telling of my conversion to Orthodoxy will react as well as the ones I have already spoken with have.

So far I've spoken with one in person, one on the phone and another who rang me after I sent a letter to wish me well. Some of those whom I had thought I might hear from after sending letters have not contacted me. Others I'm not so sure about. One other whom I spoke to in person seemed a little shocked but I doubt he realises how different Orthodoxy is to Protestantism. He was simply surprised that I left the Baptists. I made clear that I still wanted to be friends with him though as he has had an unfortunate life of repeated rejections so this is important to him.

Just about to start telling some who could react strongly so please pray in this regard. Haven't told my mother yet which could be interesting.

Also please pray for my step-grandmother whose health is starting to go downhill. She is nominally Muslim as are most Malays but having spent 40 years in Australia she isn't exactly practising. May the Lord make her whole before her departure please.
Logged

...because I was not with you when the Lord came aforetime.
...because I am blind and yet I see.
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2007, 01:28:52 PM »

I pray that they will take the news of your conversion well and will not lead to any strained relationships.

I had to tell my 91 year old Italian Nonna about my conversion from Roman Catholic to Orthodoxy, believe me, I was nervous too.   Tongue  Things went very well though.  Once she found out I wasn't going Protestant (my cousin recently married into a Protestant sect), she was perfect about it.  She even offered me this old iron crucifix necklace my Nonno wore to ward off the malocchio while I am 'in-between Churches'.   Cheesy
« Last Edit: May 20, 2007, 01:29:09 PM by Friul » Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
Starlight
Site Supporter
OC.net guru
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of USA (Ecumenical Patriarchate)
Posts: 1,537


« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2007, 12:52:02 AM »

Didymus,
May God help you in your plans. May Jesus bless your relative as well.
Logged
Didymus
Peace and grace.
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: HG Coptic Bishop Anba Daniel of Sydney
Posts: 563


St. Thomas Didymus the Apostle of India


« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2007, 04:19:48 AM »

Thank you.

Friul, sorry but what is a malocchio? Glad all went well for you. If it is alright to ask, which Protestant sect was it? If you prefer, message me.

Starlight, this would help greatly thank you.
Logged

...because I was not with you when the Lord came aforetime.
...because I am blind and yet I see.
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2007, 12:51:05 PM »

Friul, sorry but what is a malocchio? Glad all went well for you. If it is alright to ask, which Protestant sect was it? If you prefer, message me.

The Malocchio is part of Mediterranean folklore/superstition and can be found in peasant culture from Spain to Italy to the Balkans to the Near East.  It is known as the 'Evil Eye', 'Eye of Envy' or 'Eye of Harm'.  Supposedly in Italian tradition, iron wards it off.  Christianity eventually changed it to more of a demonic thing, hence the cross.  It is also why traditionally at an Italian wedding, the groom will always have a piece of iron in his pocket.

The Protestant sect was the Church of Christ, her Father-in-law is a pastor.  I am truly worried for her, since some congregations seem very cult-like.
Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
scamandrius
Crusher of Secrets; House Lannister
Warned
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Greek Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek by desire; Antiochian by necessity
Posts: 5,930



« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2007, 01:03:39 PM »

The Malocchio is part of Mediterranean folklore/superstition and can be found in peasant culture from Spain to Italy to the Balkans to the Near East.  It is known as the 'Evil Eye', 'Eye of Envy' or 'Eye of Harm'.  Supposedly in Italian tradition, iron wards it off.  Christianity eventually changed it to more of a demonic thing, hence the cross.  It is also why traditionally at an Italian wedding, the groom will always have a piece of iron in his pocket.

Friul,

Is this how one makes the sign of the malocchio in Italy today?  If I'm not mistaken, this custom actually goes back to the Romans.  Just curious.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2007, 01:04:12 PM by scamandrius » Logged

I seek the truth by which no man was ever harmed--Marcus Aurelius

Those who do not read  history are doomed to get their facts from Hollywood--Anonymous

What earthly joy remains untouched by grief?--St. John Damascene
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2007, 01:33:28 PM »

Friul,

Is this how one makes the sign of the malocchio in Italy today?  If I'm not mistaken, this custom actually goes back to the Romans.  Just curious.

It really depends on the region and the influences.  Since Italy has Roman, Greek and Arabic influences in different regions, different takes on it appeared. 

In Friuli, it is believed that it is passed on through a malevolent gaze, usually from someone seen as evil or envious (hence the reason it is an important part of a wedding, envious onlookers could doom the couple).  The picture you showed (the corna) is threefold in Italian culture:  It can be used to protect you from bad luck (there is a story about this and the late Italian President Giovanni Leone), to put it over a man's head is to show they are a cuckold (cornuto, having the horns [There is a story about Silvio Berlusconi and this at an international conference]), or to cruse someone (though not the same as the malocchio, though it must be pointed directly at you).  To rid the curse you can touch iron (the Italian version of knocking on wood), do the corna, or, if you are a guy, grab your genitals (though seen as vulgar, it is especially common amongst older men).

The origins of the corna are either Greek or Roman, I am not exactly sure.  The origins of the malocchio are not exactly known since it is well known all over the Med area, though it is believed to have come from Asia Minor/Near East.
Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
GabrieltheCelt
Hillbilly Extraordinaire
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,987


Chasin' down a Hoodoo...


« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2007, 02:09:39 PM »


 Didymus,

 Welcome home, dear brother! I will pray for you and your grandmother. I believe things will go well for you Didymus, just be patient with everyone's questions (some will be strange and some will be downright funny). Going from being a Baptist to Orthodoxy can be stressful, but it will be a great experience that you can share with others who are interested in becomming Orthodox. 

She is nominally Muslim as are most Malays...

 Are you then, Malay? Apa kabar?

 Gabriel
Logged

"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying
Didymus
Peace and grace.
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: HG Coptic Bishop Anba Daniel of Sydney
Posts: 563


St. Thomas Didymus the Apostle of India


« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2007, 08:29:53 AM »

Friul, thank you for explaining that. So you're aware, the main group which falsely calls itself the "Church of Christ" is a mainstream Protestant group like Methodists or Baptists. However there are various smaller (including some rather odd groups) which also call themselves this or names similar to this. It would be best to find out exactly which your cousin is part of but regardless, your cousin is in danger as you are aware. +Lord have mercy.

Jibrail Almuhajir, may I please ask whereabouts you are from? To clarify what I said before, my step-mother is Malay although her father was Irish. When I said my step-grandmother, I meant my step-mother's mother. I understand some Bahasa from school but my step-mum does not speak it having been raised in Australia and her mother speaks it the way it was spoken when they left Malaysia 40 years ago. Thank you for your words about conversion as well. Do you speak from experience at all?
Logged

...because I was not with you when the Lord came aforetime.
...because I am blind and yet I see.
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2007, 11:30:40 AM »

Friul, thank you for explaining that. So you're aware, the main group which falsely calls itself the "Church of Christ" is a mainstream Protestant group like Methodists or Baptists. However there are various smaller (including some rather odd groups) which also call themselves this or names similar to this. It would be best to find out exactly which your cousin is part of but regardless, your cousin is in danger as you are aware. +Lord have mercy.

When I found out she was converting/marrying into the "Church of Christ", I did a good deal of research into them.  Since they are congregationalists, the nature of their beliefs and all vary from parish to parish, pastor to pastor.  Some are very cult-like, while others are much more mainstream.  They all seem to be part of the American Restoration movement, so they appear to have fairly strict "Arminian" beliefs.  I was able to talk to their pastor, her father-in-law, and they appear to be very mainstream Protestant, with the exception of no drinking and no dancing allowed.  It has put my mind at some ease, compared to some of these cult-like (nearly Mormon) congregations that have support groups set up, but like I said before I am worried.

Thank you for your prayers.
Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
JawaMan
Bishop of All Tatooine
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 59

n00b


« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2007, 02:50:41 PM »

Hi Didymus. I converted to Orthodoxy from the Southern Baptist church (though we live in New York, go figure). During my first year of college I was petrified stiff to tell anyone about my desire to become Orthodox, but near the end of the school year when I was finishing sifting through doubt and finding confidence in God, I did it. And guess what? Not a single person was bothered by it. One person I told, a guy who I talked with every week for spiritual counseling, wanted me to explain the history of Orthodoxy to him, which I did for about two hours. And my parents were thrilled. My dad, who is culturally Jewish, appreciated how Orthodoxy is more like Judaism than evangelicalism is. He especially liked how our church buildings are called 'temples'. I hope it rolls over well for you, too. Just try to be confident in God and His love for you.
Logged
GabrieltheCelt
Hillbilly Extraordinaire
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,987


Chasin' down a Hoodoo...


« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2007, 03:27:25 PM »

Jibrail Almuhajir, may I please ask whereabouts you are from? To clarify what I said before, my step-mother is Malay although her father was Irish. When I said my step-grandmother, I meant my step-mother's mother. I understand some Bahasa from school but my step-mum does not speak it having been raised in Australia and her mother speaks it the way it was spoken when they left Malaysia 40 years ago. Thank you for your words about conversion as well. Do you speak from experience at all?

Yes, I am speaking from experience. I was raised Assemblies of God (Pentecostal) then left religion for several years before converting to Islam for most of the 90's. During that time I met and married a woman from Indonesia (which is where I learned to speak a little Bahasa Indonesia/Malaya). When I left Islam, around 2001, I didn't tell anyone (except of coarse my wife), but most of them 'intuitively' knew. The people I thought were my friends simply vanished. Phone calls were not returned, emails went unanswered. And sadly, my marriage ended. Those who had known me only as a Muslim and now saw that I was a Christian thought I was odd, which I thought was odd seeing that I live in the buckle of the Bible Belt. When I began telling people that I was Eastern Orthodox, I remember being asked by another Christian if I believed in Jesus. Huh Another Christian asked me why we call it 'Pasha' Wink instead of Easter. Another person said, after explaining EO, "So you're Catholic without the Pope?"

I'd be happy to share other stories with you if you think it'll help.

 Gabriel
Logged

"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2007, 05:09:54 PM »

Another Christian asked me why we call it 'Pasha' Wink instead of Easter.

Ask them if they know what "Easter" is in Spanish, you know, what the Mexicans here speak.  It's only the Germanic language people that use the pagan name.
Logged
GabrieltheCelt
Hillbilly Extraordinaire
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 6,987


Chasin' down a Hoodoo...


« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2007, 11:15:40 PM »

Ask them if they know what "Easter" is in Spanish, you know, what the Mexicans here speak.  It's only the Germanic language people that use the pagan name.


 Good point. I'm afraid I would've been met with a blank stare though. I thought Easter came from an old English word for some ancient pagan goddess or something.
Logged

"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying
Entscheidungsproblem
Formerly Friul & Nebelpfade
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Machine God
Posts: 4,495



WWW
« Reply #14 on: June 04, 2007, 11:42:06 PM »

I thought Easter came from an old English word for some ancient pagan goddess or something.

Yup, allegedly the Germanic pagan goddess Eostre.
Logged

As a result of a thousand million years of evolution, the universe is becoming conscious of itself, able to understand something of its past history and its possible future.
-- Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS
Tags: ex-Protestant  convert conversion 
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.069 seconds with 41 queries.