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Author Topic: Declaration of Pat. Ignatius IV that Non-Chalcedonians may commune...  (Read 7860 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: May 09, 2003, 11:37:08 PM »

http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/ecumenism/antioch_mono.htm

Here is the document where Pat. Ignatius gives permission for his patriarchate to commune Non-Chalcedonians.  Now please note that while I do not endorse the anti-union propoganda of that website, I have checked the accuracy at least of Pat. Ignatius IV's work and that letter appears in an offical publication of the dialogue between the two Churches.

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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2003, 08:15:14 AM »

Thanks Anastasios, I don't know how long it would've taken me to track that down on-line!  I've only ever seen it in print.
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2003, 10:04:22 AM »

Interesting. This raises a number of questions for me.

Are there documents from the non-Chalcedonians patriarchs and Metropolitans saying likewise that they will commune Eastern Orthodox?

Also, below Samer mentions that Uniates are also communed by non-Chalcedonians. Is that just a local practice or something approved by the patriarchs too? Is this just for Uniates or can Latin rite Roman Catholics commune at the cup of non-Chalcedonians too?

It seems to me that if the Antiochian Church is communing and concelebrating with non-Chalcedonians that they are then in communion with them, no?
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2003, 10:35:45 AM »

Also, below Samer mentions that Uniates are also communed by non-Chalcedonians. Is that just a local practice or something approved by the patriarchs too? Is this just for Uniates or can Latin rite Roman Catholics commune at the cup of non-Chalcedonians too?

No, my aside in that post concerned Melkites and Byzantine Orthodox.  Rite is what makes things stick and what defines religious praxis, so a Melkite is much more likely to pray in a church belonging to his Orthodox counterpart rather than in a Syrian church.  As this is the case, I cannot be certain as to whether situations and cases do exist where Orientals permit Eastern Catholics (or certain select groups such as Catholics of their own Rite) to commune.  I would say though that this is officially disallowed.  As for Roman Catholics, they are the minority where I come from, and therefore their situation is not observed or warranted much attention by us.  I cannot say what happens on the ground with them.

Fortunatos would be able to clarify whether in Egypt Coptic Catholics are sometimes allowed Communion, regardless of the Orthodox Church's official stance.
I'll put forth the question to him: how strong a level of intermarriage exists between members of the two Coptic Churches, and what is the situation on the ground concerning the communion of C.C.'s by Orthodox priests?

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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2003, 11:50:09 AM »



It seems to me that if the Antiochian Church is communing and concelebrating with non-Chalcedonians that they are then in communion with them, no?
Quote

Yes Nik, that seems to be the case in my eyes as well.  There are some who feel that communion should be re-established in just such a way, at the local level between the autocephalous Churches, as opposed to in a big ecumenical council.  Either way is fine with me.  Are there documents from the Non-Chalcedonian Patriarchs stating that intercommunion and sharing the altar with the Antiochians is okay?  Yes, I think that there is something from H.H. Moran Mar Ignatius Zakka I Iwas, but I'm not gonna hunt around on the web for it!  Smiley  Oh, and as far as I know, we don't commune Catholics except in cases of "economia".  Even Coptic Catholics.  Too many differences and too many attempts at proselytism (from their side).

In XC,

Nick
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2003, 12:13:08 PM »

As I like to regularly state (so that there is no confusion), I am still officially Byzantine Catholic but am on the road to Orthodoxy (my spiritual father told me to hold off conversion while my wife is opposed to it at least for a certain amount of time).

That being said, when I was in India, I was communed by permission of Mor Philoxenthos of New Delhi;

I have been communed by the Armenians 5 times, once by their Archbishop in America.

I offer this not to brag but merely to offer information.

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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2003, 12:59:31 PM »


The Syriac rite and Armenian rite both will permit communite of Catholics (all rites) under extreme circumstances where there is no OO church nearby.  This is the case in Saudi Arabia I believe, where our churches "don't exist."
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2003, 02:31:00 PM »

My biggest beef is with the Coptic Catholics and their rampant attempts at proselytism among our faithful in Egypt..  H.H. the Pope of Rome even asked them to lay off.  The Western rite Catholics, in spite of our many theological differences, seem to have a lot of respect for our independence and our traditions.

Anastasios, I have another question: If you are still at least nominally Catholic, how many Ecumenical Councils do you enumerate?  Do the Byzantine Rite Catholics number only seven, or do they count all the Roman councils too, like Lateran IV, Vatican II, etc.

In XC,

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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2003, 02:36:59 PM »

Nick,

I personally only beleive in 7 and so do many of my Eastern Catholic bretheren (including many bishops) but there are just as many if not more who accept all the latin councils.

For an interesting history of Roman/Byzantine post-schism councils, etc., see the oc.net exclusive article:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/articles/Dvornik_whichcouncils.html

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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2003, 03:00:44 PM »

Interesting.  So if many Byzantine Catholics accept only seven councils as ecumenical, and yet remain in full communion with the Latin Church which enumerates many more, why can the same not be true for our proposed union with the Eastern Orthodox?
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2003, 03:27:56 PM »

Well the Byzantine Catholics that do only accept 7 are continuously referred to as heretical or wrong by Latin Catholics.  It causes immense confusion also when two Catholics get into a debate about which councils they accept, and makes the unity of the faith suspect.

Also, to my knowledge, no Eastern Catholics from the Non-Chalcedonian Churches (such as Syriac Catholics) have ever successfully tried to state they only accept 3 councils.

I think that seven is "the magic number" but as long as the teachings of the councils are affirmed (such as Nicea II's teaching on icons) I would be happy--I mean the issue needs to be explored further, namely, "what is an ecumenical council in the first place, what is acceptance of a council entail, etc."

For instance, we venerate all the 7 councils in our liturgy but we could never presume to make you do that... I'm just thinking out loud here.

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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2003, 04:17:35 PM »

Also, below Samer mentions that Uniates are also communed by non-Chalcedonians. Is that just a local practice or something approved by the patriarchs too? Is this just for Uniates or can Latin rite Roman Catholics commune at the cup of non-Chalcedonians too?
Fortunatos would be able to clarify whether in Egypt Coptic Catholics are sometimes allowed Communion, regardless of the Orthodox Church's official stance.
I'll put forth the question to him: how strong a level of intermarriage exists between members of the two Coptic Churches, and what is the situation on the ground concerning the communion of C.C.'s by Orthodox priests?
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Well, I've never seen a Coptic Catholic receive communion in an Orthodox church in Egypt, but this is likely because I come from a city that has a Coptic Catholic church. The majority of Coptic Catholics are virtually Orthodox, though officially we are certainly not allowed to commune them. I would imagine though, that in cases where there are no Catholic churches, that it might  and probably does happen.

Re: Marriage - In general, since the Coptic Orthodox will not marry anyone who isn't Orthodox in the church, most Catholics convert to Orthodoxy, but again - they don't see this as a big deal since most of them were Orthodox in belief anyway... Marriage with Catholics, however, is far more common than marriage with Chalcedonians - because of the difference in numbers.

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« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2003, 08:15:58 AM »

Christ is Risen!

Just popped in real quick to let everyone know that all we have discussed here will be in my prayers today at Liturgy, and I will bring it before the relics of the saints in our Church.

in Christ,

Nick
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« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2003, 12:55:08 PM »

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Quote
It seems to me that if the Antiochian Church is communing and concelebrating with non-Chalcedonians that they are then in communion with them, no?

There's a difference between formal communion (including concelebration) and allowing people of other jurisdictions/groups to commune. Not everyone follows this distinction, but many modern relationships are built on this distinction (e.g., that between the moderate traditionalists and "world Orthodoxy," that between the monophysites and "world Orthodoxy," etc.) Essentially, the distinction is a tacit nod that the sacraments of the other group are valid, but it's also a situation in which the group that has admittedly valid sacraments is not looked upon as being in full communion (due to past schism, or due to a currently held innovation).
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« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2003, 01:05:44 PM »

Well the Byzantine Catholics that do only accept 7 are continuously referred to as heretical or wrong by Latin Catholics.  It causes immense confusion also when two Catholics get into a debate about which councils they accept, and makes the unity of the faith suspect.

XB!

The BCs that accept only 7 councils are also not in favor with many (I would say most) BC priests.  (There are implications to this that could be discussed in another thread.)    

Archbishop ELIAS Zoghby was/is a proponent of a type of Byzantine Catholicism that was more like "Orthodoxy-in-communion-with-Rome."  Basically he argued that the BCs could be Orthodox in faith and practice yet under Roman jurisdiction.  He was also a proponent of the "double-communion" idea in the Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarchate of Antioch (commonly called the "Zoghby Initiative").  That initiative was rejected by Rome and the Melkites were somewhat reprimanded for not taking into account that church unity had to take place at the head.

I do not know if Zoghby was publically censured but it is said that he was sent to a monastery in the desert of Palestine as a consequence.    

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« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2003, 01:12:32 PM »

Oh, and as far as I know, we don't commune Catholics except in cases of "economia".  Even Coptic Catholics.  Too many differences and too many attempts at proselytism (from their side).

Nick,

Christ is Risen!

What does "too many differences" mean above?  Thanks!

Tony
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« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2003, 01:46:56 PM »

Dear Tony,

Truly He is Risen!  By "too many differences" I mean all of the differences that exist between Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism.  All of the theological and christological differences between the Eastern Orthodox and the Oriental Orthodox have been resolved, only the enumeration of the Councils remains to separate us.  This is not the case between us and the Catholics (as pertains to filioque, papal infallibility, purgatory, etc.).

In XC,

Nick
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« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2003, 01:58:21 PM »

Ah I still remember fondly September of 1998, when I met my first Coptic priest, Aboona Misaeil.  What a day! He gave me a tour of the Church, then gave me tea, then sat me down on the couch and said, "now let me tell you why your church is... HERETICAL!!!!!! "

We argued for two hours and have been friends ever since!  Grin

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« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2003, 02:21:14 PM »

Some excerpted notes from H.B. Patriarch Ignatius IV's Declaration regarding concelebration:

6) If two bishops of the two different Churches meet for a spiritual service the one with the majority of the people will generally preside. But if the service is for the sacrament of holy matrimony the bishop of the bridegroom will preside.

7) Whatever has been previously mentioned does not apply to the concelebration among the bishops in the Divine Liturgy.

8 ) Whatever has been said in number six applies to the clergy of both Churches.

9) If one priest of either Church happens to be in a certain area he will serve the Divine Mysteries for the members of both Churches including the Divine Liturgy and the sacrament of holy matrimony. The same priest will keep an independent record for both Churches and transmit the registration of the members of the sister Church to its spiritual authority.

10) If two priests of both Churches happen to be in a certain community they will take turns, and in case they concelebrate the one with the majority of the people will preside.

11) If a bishop from one Church and a priest from the sister Church happen to concelebrate, presiding naturally belongs to the bishop even though being in the community of the priest on the condition that there are people of both Churches.

According to this, concelebration between Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox bishops and priests is ongoing and follows an established series of provisions.  Ah, the progress that "nestorians" and "monophysites" can make when they really try!  Wink  May God's will be done in all things.
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« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2003, 02:33:24 PM »

According to this, concelebration between Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox bishops and priests is ongoing and follows an established series of provisions.  Ah, the progress that "nestorians" and "monophysites" can make when they really try!

Aha Nikolas, but if the Antiochians and the "monophysites" are freely concelebrating and communicating one another, would not this make the Antiochians apostates, schismatics or heretics to the Eastern Orthodox that view "monophysites" as heretics?

I am thinking that wide-spread knowledge of this agreement could simply cause further division.  :cwm14:
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« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2003, 02:59:01 PM »

 :'( Aren't semantics important in Orthodoxy? That is what I thought.
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« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2003, 07:28:20 PM »

According to this, concelebration between Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox bishops and priests is ongoing and follows an established series of provisions.  Ah, the progress that "nestorians" and "monophysites" can make when they really try!

Aha Nikolas, but if the Antiochians and the "monophysites" are freely concelebrating and communicating one another, would not this make the Antiochians apostates, schismatics or heretics to the Eastern Orthodox that view "monophysites" as heretics?

I am thinking that wide-spread knowledge of this agreement could simply cause further division.  :cwm14:

A valid question Nick, but not one that I could answer.  I don't know who would be so bold as to call the venerable bishops of the Antiochian Church "apostates, schismatics or heretics" without first hearing their side of the story.  I'm sure they didn't rush into this without studying the theology involved.  The talks have been ongoing since the 1950's.  I feel bad for anyone who would excommunicate themselves from the Church because they couldn't comprehend the decisions of its hierarchs and synods. :'(  Perhaps they lack a working knowledge of Greek which would allow them to distinguish between the concepts of mia physis, mono physis, and dia physis, and see that we are not now and have never been monophysites.  Perhaps they are unfamiliar or only vaguely familiar with the history of the Church and do not understand what exactly happened or what we really believe.  Perhaps their understanding of Orthodoxy is so shallow that their conception of what constitutes the True Church is threatened by our existence.  Who knows?  As you can see, I've given this a little thought because as much as I'd like to see this reunion take place, the obvious pain these people are in troubles me.

Not to make this a "cradle" vs. "convert" issue, but a "cradle" Orthodox friend of mine from an OCA Church told me that a lot of the flak is coming from recently converted Evangelicals who have brought with them their "I'm-saved-covered-by-the-Blood-of-Jesus-and-you're-not" mentallity, which is alien to the authentic Orthodox phronima, while those born in the Orthodox Church, or who have been there a long time, are more secure in their Faith and don't feel threatened by the ending of this schism.  (His words not mine). Only God and the individuals concerned know for sure.

That being said, I wouldn't want any "politcally correct" type union under false pretenses.  I would rather that everyone's concerns be heard and addressed.  If what the majority of theologians and hierarchs on both sides are saying is true then it will stand up to scrutiny.  May God's will be done in this and all things.

In XC,

Nick
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« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2003, 08:30:52 PM »

:'( Aren't semantics important in Orthodoxy? That is what I thought.

XB!

Maybe I am missing something but I didn't see "semantics" introduced before this post.

Tony
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« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2003, 01:21:49 AM »

Have any concelebrations take place yet?

From what I've been told (I haven't seen it first-hand), they are common.  Not just with Syrians and Antiochians, but also with Armenians and Antiochians.
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« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2003, 10:27:49 AM »

Quote
Not to make this a "cradle" vs. "convert" issue, but a "cradle" Orthodox friend of mine from an OCA Church told me that a lot of the flak is coming from recently converted Evangelicals who have brought with them their "I'm-saved-covered-by-the-Blood-of-Jesus-and-you're-not" mentallity, which is alien to the authentic Orthodox phronima, while those born in the Orthodox Church, or who have been there a long time, are more secure in their Faith and don't feel threatened by the ending of this schism.  (His words not mine). Only God and the individuals concerned know for sure.

I find your OCA friend's remark disturbing.

I am a convert to Orthodoxy, which puts me in good company, since all of the first Christians were converts.

And I am a person who would love to see peace and unity among Christians. Heck, I even pray for reunion with Rome and the eventual conversion of all the Protestants, too!

But the kind of unity I want to see would be a real unity in Christ, a unity that does not compromise the deposit of faith once delivered to the saints.

Perhaps the problem is not so much the "I'm-saved-covered-by-the-Blood-of-Jesus-and-you're-not mentality" as it is the "I-and-my-family-have-been-Orthodox-so-long-we-have-box-seats-in-heaven-and-take-it-for-granted-yawn" mentality that is willing to countenance almost any compromise in the name of a false ecumenism.

If I had wanted to be "ethnic" I would have remained a Lutheran.

I became Orthodox as a result of a love for the truth.

If there is a reunion between the OO and EO I want it to come from the same kind of love.
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« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2003, 10:42:20 AM »

Have any concelebrations take place yet?

From what I've been told (I haven't seen it first-hand), they are common.  Not just with Syrians and Antiochians, but also with Armenians and Antiochians.

Daer MIkho,

That may very well be true BUT we need concrete citations, please, on a subject as serious as this--could you ask your friends for more details?  No names, please, but a general timeframe, a general place where it occured, whether the bishop objected, etc.  I've seen an Antiochian priest communicate Non-Chalcedonians BUT I have never seen a concelebration.  I will ask some of my non-Chal. friends if they can give me any specifics from their experience.

In Christ,

anastasios
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« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2003, 11:55:32 AM »


I find your OCA friend's remark disturbing.

I am a convert to Orthodoxy, which puts me in good company, since all of the first Christians were converts.

And I am a person who would love to see peace and unity among Christians. Heck, I even pray for reunion with Rome and the eventual conversion of all the Protestants, too!

But the kind of unity I want to see would be a real unity in Christ, a unity that does not compromise the deposit of faith once delivered to the saints.

I became Orthodox as a result of a love for the truth.

If there is a reunion between the OO and EO I want it to come from the same kind of love.



My sentiments exactly!  Cheesy I'm no fan of false ecumenism either, and I don't intend to compromise the Orthodox Faith in the name a possible reunion with the Byzantines.  From what I've read and heard, I'm pretty sure that they are just as Orthodox as we are, but that is for the bishops to decide.  As I've said, no reunion under false pretenses.  

Please don't judge my OCA buddy too harshly.  He's a good guy, and his heart was in the right place. You kinda had to hear the whole conversation.  There were "converts" involved in the discussion too.  I can't wait to see his reaction when I tell him about the "box seats in heaven" thing.  I'll bet he'll crack up laughing!  Grin  I think that what he was trying to say was that some of the folks who came to Orthodoxy from another sect are greatly relieved, feeling that "At last!  I've found the True Church!" feeling.  Then, when they find out that it just may be possible that there is another ecclesiastical body out there that has also maintained the Orthodox Faith, but is not in Communion with the Church that they know, they find this jarring.  They almost wish that we didn't exist because we are a threat to their idea of what constitutes the "True Church".  To their mind, if we are not in Communion we cannot both be Orthodox.  They thought that they were through with divisions and denominations when they left Protestantism, but now they see that the Orthodox world is not as monolithic as they thought.  What they don't see is that this isn't a cut-and-dry Western legalistic mentality that we deal with here in the East.  There is no "I'm in, you're out" thing going on.  At worst there is a notion of "I'm in through the grace of God, about you, I'm not yet sure, but I know you have a God who loves you".

Its all in the hands of God and his servants the bishops.  This discussion is getting to be like flogging a dead horse.  I think that everyone has said all that needs to be said for everyone to make their decisions.  May God be merciful to us all, and his will be done.
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« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2003, 12:22:39 PM »

Have any concelebrations take place yet?

From what I've been told (I haven't seen it first-hand), they are common.  Not just with Syrians and Antiochians, but also with Armenians and Antiochians.

Daer MIkho,

That may very well be true BUT we need concrete citations, please, on a subject as serious as this--could you ask your friends for more details?  No names, please, but a general timeframe, a general place where it occured, whether the bishop objected, etc.  I've seen an Antiochian priest communicate Non-Chalcedonians BUT I have never seen a concelebration.  I will ask some of my non-Chal. friends if they can give me any specifics from their experience.

In Christ,

anastasios

Could you explain the seriousness of it?

Please visit http://sor.cua.edu/

And search for Churches and Monestaries.  Call and ask to speak with Fr. Joseph Tarzi.  He can help you out better than I can.
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« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2003, 12:42:23 PM »

I mean it is a serious occurance.  I personally don't think it's bad almost every EO person here would.  It is also can be construed as a step towards unity or a step away from true unity (aka "ecumenism") hence it is serious. It's not a trivial matter like Copts agreeing that Byzantines can cross themselves "backwards."  

That's what I meant by serious.

Thanks for the link as well!

anastasios
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« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2003, 07:44:31 PM »

Christ is Risen!

In Orthodoxy to be in communion with someone is to have the exact same Faith. So when the Antiochian bishops are communing and concelebrating the Syrian church they are saying we share one Faith. The above written statement seem to affirm this.

Thus, anyone in communion with Antioch is of the same Faith of the Antiochian church & her bishops, which by its communion is the same Faith of the Syrians and anyone in communion with them.

It would even reach us ROCOR folk, as we are in communion with the Jerusalem Patriarchate and the Serbian Orthodox Church who are each in communion with the Antiochians.

But concelebration seems to be the physical symbol of shared Faith, so that is why proof of concelebration would be so important. It would have long reaching effects through both sides.

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« Reply #30 on: June 22, 2003, 09:23:27 AM »

Ecumenical Relations of the Syriac Orthodox Church

Relationships with the Assyrian Church of the East

Dialogue with the Assyrian Church of the East is more recent than that with other families of churches. The 'Syriac Dialogues' sponsored by the Pro Oriente foundation in June 1994, February 1996 (Vienna), and July 1997 (Chicago) among Churches of the Syriac tradition paved the way for theological discussions between the Syriac Orthodox Church and Assyrian Church of the East. At the 1997 meeting, it was announced that Patriarchs Ignatius Zakka I and Dinkha IV had "agreed to appoint a bilateral commission to explore ways to bring about a rapprochement between their Churches". In addition, Patriarch Mar Dinkha IV announced that the Synod of the Assyrian Church of the East held in the previous month had decided to remove from their liturgical books the anathemas and condemnations against such figures as Cyril of Alexandria and Severus of Antioch and to inaugurate a bilateral program to bring about the full ecclesial union of the two Churches (Brock et al, 2001).

On March 2, 1998, the two Patriarchs met at the Monastery of Mar Maroun in Annaya, Lebanon, and made further progress in dialogue between the two Churches. However, further dialogue became more difficult when the meeting of Oriental Orthodox Churches later that month convened by the Coptic Orthodox Patriarch, Pope Shenouda, decided that all Oriental Orthodox Churches should act together in theological dialogue and not engage in bilateral discussion (See statement).
http://sor.cua.edu/Ecumenism/19980311OODeclaration.html

Relationships with the Eastern (Chalcedonian) Orthodox Churches
Among all Christian Churches, the Eastern Orthodox Churches are closer to the Oriental Churches in spirituality, doctrine, and in historical experience. Dialogue with this family of Churches has the potential to be the most fruitful......................As a result of the second meeting, on 22nd July 1991, between Patriarch Ignatius Zakka I and Patriarch Ignatius IV Hazim a number of important decisions were published in a statement. (Brock et al, 2001).
http://sor.cua.edu/Ecumenism/19911112SOCRumOrthStmt.html

Relationships with the Roman Catholic Church
Dialogue between the Syriac Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church was initiated under the auspices of the Pro Oriente, an ecumenical foundation in Vienna, founded by Cardinal K+¦nig, Archbishop of Vienna in 1964. Pro Oriente initiated unofficial consultations with the Oriental Orthodox and Roman Catholic theologians in Vienna in 1971, 1976, and 1988. In 1994, the Pro Oriente constituted a Syriac Commission at its meeting in Lebanon for dialogue between eight Churches (including three Catholic rites) of Syriac tradition; three Syriac Consultations have been held in 1994 and 1996 at Vienna and in 1997 at Chicago.
http://sor.cua.edu/Ecumenism/19970711SyriacConsultation.html

The Pro Oriente consultations focussing particularly on the Christological doctrines resulted in what is known today as Vienna Christological Formulations and paved the way for subsequent bilateral Christological agreements between the heads of the Churches.
http://sor.cua.edu/Ecumenism/RC.html
The first of these during the reign of Patriarch Mor Ignatius Yaqub III of Antioch and Pope Paul VI of Rome resulted in a joint declaration issued in Vatican on October 27, 1971 signed by Patriarch Yaqub III and Pope Paul VI. This dialogue was continued by their Holinesses Patriarch Mor Ignatius Zakka I Iwas, and Pope John Paul II and culminated in a joint declaration on June 23, 1984 at Rome. In November 1993, the Joint Theological Commission of the Catholic and the Malankara Syrian Orthodox Churches drafted an agreement on inter-church marriages, known today as the "Kerala Agreement." This was approved by Pope John Paul II and Patriarch Zakka I and released on January 25, 1994.
http://sor.cua.edu/Ecumenism/19940125SOCRCMarriageAgmt.html

Relationships with the Anglican Communion
The Anglican Communion has had a long relationship with the Syriac Orthodox Church both in the Middle East and in Malankara over the past two centuries. The Christian Mission Society established missions at the turn of the 19th century ostensibly to emancipate the ancient communities. The relationship became strained for various reasons and resulted eventually in the establishment of Anglican communions and other Protestant denominations among the Syrian Christians.

In November 2002, the Anglican Communion reached a consensus on Christology with the Oriental Orthodox Churches . Both Churches said they confessed that there was "one Christ, one Son, one Lord" and that "the perfect union of divinity and humanity in the incarnate Word is essential to the salvation of the human race". (See report by The Right Rev Geoffrey Rowell.)
http://sor.cua.edu/Ecumenism/20021123AnglicanOORpt.html



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« Reply #31 on: June 22, 2003, 05:28:54 PM »

Quote
Relationships with the Anglican Communion
The Anglican Communion has had a long relationship with the Syriac Orthodox Church both in the Middle East and in Malankara over the past two centuries. The Christian Mission Society established missions at the turn of the 19th century ostensibly to emancipate the ancient communities. The relationship became strained for various reasons and resulted eventually in the establishment of Anglican communions (sic) and other Protestant denominations among the Syrian Christians.


Might this refer to starting the Protestant Reformation among some Malankara (Indian) members of the Syrian Church, which created the Mar Thoma Church in India? (This retains an Eastern fa+ºade but is part of the Anglican Communion.) What else might it refer to?
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