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Author Topic: A beautiful end  (Read 796 times) Average Rating: 0
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aurelia
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« on: March 19, 2007, 09:38:44 AM »

This was posted on a forum I am active in, I really wanted to share it here.  It is noce to see that some people can have a love like that.

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 love is a very strong emotion
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 i just read this in my local paper it is a very sweet, but, sad story.. get the kleenex ready.


Violet and Orville Peacock, together to the end
After 65 years of marriage and devotion to each other, the husband and wife
died a day apart.
By Darlene Prois, Star Tribune

Last update: March 13, 2007 - 9:39 PM



Violet and Orville Peacock

Orville Peacock called the shots during his 65-year marriage to Violet. Over
the years, relatives had grown accustomed to hearing Orville's gruff
pronouncements when he tired of the family gatherings that Violet so loved.
"Vi," he'd shout on his way out the door. "The bus is leaving. Are you
coming or not?"

Vi would grumble, but she would follow.

On Thursday, Orville died at 93. Violet died the next day.

"It's a love story, if not really a fairy tale," said their son John of
Maple Grove. "But the ending was absolutely super. They cared deeply about
each other."

The couple lived together in their Brooklyn Center apartment until December,
when 89-year old Violet was hospitalized with circulatory problems.

"That was the downfall of my father," John said. "He felt lost without her."

Theirs had been a marriage typical of the era. Orville earned the living,
working as a machinist and grinder at Ford Motor Co. When the babies came,
Violet gave up her job as a seamstress to make a home for Orville and their
sons John, Tom and Terry.

"She was the one who took care of us," said Tom. "She was the buffer between
us and dad."

They were private people, especially Orville. Violet loved to be with her
family, savoring weekly shopping excursions with her nieces. She would have
liked to play cards with her neighbors, too, but Orville discouraged that.
He feared she would get tired if she stayed up too late.

"He protected her almost to a fault," said John.

But as Violet's health became more fragile, Orville became her caretaker,
cooking meals and keeping track of her medicines.

A few weeks after Violet's hospitalization, Orville also fell ill. His
pneumonia failed to improve, and his family put him in hospice care at North
Memorial Medical Center. Within hours, Violet's condition worsened, too, and
she was put in a room near her husband's.

Even with medication, Orville was agitated and angry, insisting he could not
die before his beloved Vi. The couple's grandniece, Melissa Melichar, a
nursing assistant who worked on another floor at North Memorial, decided to
help.

Melichar knew how devoted Orville and Violet were to each other. For years,
she'd done home care for the couple. After finishing her shift, she went to
their rooms, determined to bring them together one last time.

At 12:10 a.m. Thursday, Melichar rolled the couple's beds together,
arranging the two on their sides, face to face. She put their hands
together.

"As soon as they touched, they both settled down," said Melichar. "I told
him to open his eyes and look at her."

Orville did. Seeing Vi, he smiled and squeezed her arm. He died 35 minutes
later.

"It was the most peaceful, happy death I've seen," Melichar said.

That evening, Melichar whispered in Violet's ear. Orville has gone, she told
her. Are you going?

She died an hour later.

The two are survived by sons John of Maple Grove, Tom of Coon Rapids and
Terry of Seattle; seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. A
memorial gathering will be held Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cremation
Society of Minnesota, 7835 Brooklyn Blvd., Brooklyn Park.


Darlene Prois . 612-673-4280 . dprois@startribune.com
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Donna Rose
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2007, 09:52:26 AM »

Thank you for posting this (as I grab a tissue to wipe my eyes lol)...what a wonderful true story to start my Monday with. Smiley

Donna
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hmmmm...
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