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Author Topic: Anathemas binding on Orthodox believers?  (Read 5738 times) Average Rating: 0
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Papist
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« Reply #45 on: February 27, 2007, 06:34:00 PM »

Todd said:

"Interestingly, if you compare Aquinas' description of the beatific vision to the teaching of St. Maximos the Confessor on the discursive knowledge of God possessed by the damned (i.e., those who participate in the third apokatastasis), you will see they are nearly the same.  Thus, what Aquinas thinks of as heaven, St. Maximos describes as hell."

Todd, that scares the hell out of me.  How could St. Thomas get it so wrong?

Are the Catholic and Orthodox ideas of heaven so entirely different?
This is assuming that Aquinas is wrong and that Maximos is right.
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« Reply #46 on: March 07, 2007, 07:14:05 PM »

Then why remain in communion with Rome? I don't say this to be offensive, but you think that the Latin Church is in error, and hold rather to the faith fo the Easter Orthodox. Then why do you remain in communion with Rome?

Wasnt the original agreement which lead some Orthodox to Rome was that they be able to keep their traditions and beliefs?   I may be mistaken but to the Eastern Catholics as long as you were under the papacy could hold onto contrasting and in many cases contradicting theologies.
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« Reply #47 on: March 07, 2007, 08:30:55 PM »

Wasnt the original agreement which lead some Orthodox to Rome was that they be able to keep their traditions and beliefs?   I may be mistaken but to the Eastern Catholics as long as you were under the papacy could hold onto contrasting and in many cases contradicting theologies.

I don't think so. Different theological formulations are O.K. Different dogmas are not.
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Ian Lazarus
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« Reply #48 on: March 12, 2007, 12:49:25 AM »

I think like so many other things across the globe, any tradition, even the traditions in error still continue despite admonishment or information.  How many Greek grandmothers still talk of the evil eye even when their priests have deemed it as nonsense,  or how many Mexican people cling to La Santa Muerte, dispite admonishment from their religious leaders?  There are still modalists, sibaliansists, aryans, and other apostates despite the efforts of the Church to eliminate the belief system. 

Now, this is an interesting topic because of the governance and traditions of the Eastern Catholics.  The situation is not ideal, in that if hardcore Roman Catholics had their way, they'd probably be forced to practice the Novus Ordo Mass instead of the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. while the hardcore Orthodox want thme either denounced or returned to their mother church.  But the truth seems to be that because it has exhisted so long, and does not show sign of change, what the others call error really cannot be changed.  Once you've lived with something for so long, it's hard to let go, no matter how much of an anomily it is.  Also, you have human life and traditions in the mix, which leads in many cases to frustration if change in any rate is the goal.

There is no easy solution what people see as problems, especially when the practicioners don't see it as  a problem at all.  But I have a question for my Eastern Catholic friends.  How do you find the situation you are in, seemingly caught between two churches ( no insult intended) but contrasting with both at some level?  Does it even cross your minds?  Is is a burden, or a challenge to be met?  Is is even that? 

My thanks.

Peace. 
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« Reply #49 on: March 14, 2007, 11:55:15 AM »

Now, this is an interesting topic because of the governance and traditions of the Eastern Catholics.  The situation is not ideal, in that if hardcore Roman Catholics had their way, they'd probably be forced to practice the Novus Ordo Mass instead of the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom.
I am a hardcore Latin Catholic but I do NOT think that the Eastern Catholics should celebrate the Novus Ordo in place of the Divine Liturgies of the East. Heck, I am going to soon be helping as a volunteer youth minister at a Ruthenian Catholic parish.
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