OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 02, 2014, 03:57:40 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 »  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Feasting Recipes  (Read 43265 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
FrChris
The Rodney Dangerfield of OC.net
Site Supporter
Taxiarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 7,252


Holy Father Patrick, thank you for your help!


« on: February 27, 2007, 12:00:23 PM »

Unfortunately I don't have any recipes at my office, otherwise I'd be including one here, but...

otherwise feel free to provide your favorite non-fasting recipe in this thread!
Logged

"As the sparrow flees from a hawk, so the man seeking humility flees from an argument". St John Climacus
aurelia
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 588


« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2007, 03:35:38 PM »

Did you all want to stipulate ethnic type recipies or just whatever floats your gravy boat? *mmmm...gravy....*

I just plain like food, so I say whatever you like.   Grin

Just for clarification, since I was so unclear....

Give us your favorite recipes, and don't worry about ethnicity! If you like it, odds are somebody else will, and happy tastebuds know no boundaries!

+Fr Chris
« Last Edit: February 27, 2007, 03:40:28 PM by FrChris » Logged
aurelia
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 588


« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2007, 03:44:53 PM »

OK, for all you seminary and college students, or those with little funding and lots of mouths to feed:

Bachelor Dinner

You need:
hamburger (whatever you need to feed however many people you have)
Beef ramen (NOT roast beef flavor unless you like it.  I just use plain beef flavor), about 1 pack per person unless you want to pig out on noodles, then get more.
toppings....shredded cheese, salsa, hot sauce, whatever you want to use.

I usually (for 3 adult size and 4 smaller beings) use 2 lbs of hamburger and 7 to 8 packs of ramen

Prep:

Pot of water on to cook noodles...bring to boil
Meanwhile brown the hamburger, drain fat off.  Add 1 pack of the beef ramen flavor per pound of meat.  Save rest of the flavor packs for later...you will see. Add a bit of water and let simmer.
Cook your ramen, drain
Put cooked meat on top, the sprinkle with beef flavor to taste.  Or you can sprinkle the noodles first, then add the meat.  this is really all up to you. Top with whatever. eat.  I said eat!

Costs next to nothing, everyone likes it! We eat it a lot.  In fact I'm hungry now.
Logged
Veniamin
Fire for Effect!
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the South
Posts: 3,372


St. Barbara, patroness of the Field Artillery


« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2007, 07:08:04 PM »

For those who like it hot, here's the recipe for my famous Habanero Chili:

You need:

1 to 2 lbs. ground beef
2 16 oz.cans black beans
2 16 oz. cans pinto beans
2 16 oz. cans chili beans
1 32 oz. can stewed tomatoes
1 large onion
1 red bell pepper
1 yellow bell pepper
1 orange bell pepper
5 jalapeno peppers
5 serrano peppers
2 dried New Mexico peppers
3 habanero peppers
Any other peppers you come across and feel like trying
Garlic powder
Irish whiskey

Brown the meat, drain, and combine in a large pot with the beans and tomatoes.  Chop the bell peppers into large pieces and add.  Dice the onion, add.  Slice the spicy peppers, except the habaneros; dice the habaneros very finely.  Add all the peppers and garlic powder.  Add a generous splash of Jameson.  Bring the pot to a low boil, then reduce heat, stirring occasionally.  Cook for at least four to five hours.

The peppers vary most times that I cook this, depending on what's available in the grocery store.  The one down the street from my place has a really good variety, so it changes depending on what I feel like throwing in.  Dried peppers are okay, but fresh are better.  Add more of the seeds from slicing the peppers if you want it spicier.  Without the meat, it's great for Lent.
Logged

Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl. ~Frederick the Great
FrChris
The Rodney Dangerfield of OC.net
Site Supporter
Taxiarches
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 7,252


Holy Father Patrick, thank you for your help!


« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2007, 01:04:41 PM »

My 14 year old son (whom some here know as The Evil Genius) has let me know that what he is craving more than anything else this fast is his newly discovered Favorite Sandwich. When he divulged his recipe for it to me, I was just flabbergasted:

Twinkie and Slim Jim Sandwich

You need:

1 Twinkie (for the sandwich's usual open-faced arrangement)
3-5 Slim Jims (the jerky-like "meat" product)

Turn Twinkie upside down so the flat side (where the cream filling in inserted) is facing up. Split Slim Jims lengthwise, and if possible squeeze any juice out to be absorbed by the doughy mass of the Twinkie.

Add mustard, hot sauce, and paprika to taste.

Immediately prior to eating, squish the Twinkie dough so that the cream is almost ready to leak out. Bite into the sandwich and enjoy (if such a thing is actually possible by a human being).

For extra indulgence (like say, coming home from Pascha services) you can use 2 Twinkies. However, this means that the sandwich would have to be turned sideways to fit into most human mouths, even after the 'squishing' process.

My son Nick came up with this sandwich after he read something that indicated Twinkies and Slim Jims are the foods most likely to survive a nuclear disaster. He figured he should try to prepare for the upcoming nuclear/biological/chemical apocalypse now, rather than wait!  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: March 01, 2007, 01:07:21 PM by FrChris » Logged

"As the sparrow flees from a hawk, so the man seeking humility flees from an argument". St John Climacus
TinaG
I am not a pessimist - I'm just grimly realistic!
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 870


If only my family were this normal !


WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2007, 02:53:55 PM »

My 14 year old son (whom some here know as The Evil Genius) has let me know that what he is craving more than anything else this fast is his newly discovered Favorite Sandwich. When he divulged his recipe for it to me, I was just flabbergasted:

Twinkie and Slim Jim Sandwich

Oooh gag.  The only drink that I think would be appropriate to wash this down with would be a big, cold Mountain Dew.   I can't figure it.  Kids won't touch strange vegetables but will gladly eat anything with the gross factor in it.  Has anyone actually seen your son eat this concoction? That's gotta be worth a picture in the family photo album.
Logged

On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2007, 10:34:56 AM »

Here is a favorite recipe in our family given to us by our God parents when we first came into the Orthodox Church .  They brought us this as a casserole to eat for bright week. Its like a Greek Lasagna only better/  It makes a wonderful presentation when served.

Pastitsio – Greek Meat and Macaroni Pie

INGREDIENTS
1 lb thick macaroni or Ziti style pasta
1 lb ground meat (beef,lamb , or pork wall work nicely)
3 eggs
¼ cup grated kefalo or Parmesan cheese
¼ cup olive oil / butter
1 medium sized onion
1 large/ 1lb can of diced tomatoes or tomato paste
1 portion béchamel sauce (Your favorite recipe)
salt
pepper

DIRECTIONS:
1.Partially cook the macaroni in salted water and drain well.
2.Put in a baking dish and pour half of the butter/olive oil over the macaroni.
3. Beat the egg whites and mix in the macaroni. Keep the yolks. They will be used to make the bechamel sauce. Sprinkle with half of the cheese.
4. With the remaining butter /olive oil brown the minced meat and the onion.
5. ATo the browned meat add the diced tomatoes or the tomato paste, salt, pepper and simmer until liquid is absorbed.
 6.Remove from the heat and add the remaining grated cheese. Stir all well.
7. Prepare the béchamel sauce..[If you don't have a recipe, you may find it in most beginners basic cook book Fannie Farmer;s, Good Housekeeping , Betty Crocker, etc]
8.Butter a baking dish. Lay half of the macaroni in the pan. Spread evenly with the meat mixture. Lay the rest of the macaroni on top. 9.Pour the bechamel sauce over them and sprinkle with grated cheese and some melted butter.
10.Bake in a moderate oven (375F) until bechamel gets brown (40 - 45 minutes).

« Last Edit: March 06, 2007, 10:35:35 AM by Thomas » Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2007, 10:39:25 AM »

Here is another "Ethnic" dish that a Lbanese friend gave me several Pascha's ago. It is really good and lot easier to make than it looks.

Kibbe Saniyeh (in pan):

Ingredients:

Bulgar Mixture:
 1 1/4 lb. ground beef
 1 1/4 cup #2 bulghur
1 onion (grated)
1 tsp.
salt
black pepper
cinnamon
 paprika

Directions for Bulgar Mixture:
1. Wash and drain bulghur, let sit for 35 minutes.
2. Mix above ingredients together.
3. Work with hands and rub together until bulghur is soft. Set aside.

Kibbe Filling Mixture:
1/4 cup pine nuts
1 lb. ground beef
1 small onion (chopped)
salt and pepper
cinnamon
paprika
clarified butter

 Directions for Kibbe Filling mixture:
1) Brown pine nuts in clarified butter. Remove pine nuts.
2) Brown ground beef, add onion and spices. Sauté until onion is soft and beef is cooked

To assemble full dish:
1) Grease edged pan with 2 tbs. oil.
2) Spread 1/2 bulghur mixture in bottom.
3) Add Kibbe filling mixture, spread evenly.
4) Cover with remaining bulghur mixture. Cut through in blocks. Edge along sides.
5)Bake 35 - 40 minutes @ 375.
6)Brush with melted butter when taken from oven.

This is nice with a yogurt-cucumber sauce.
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2007, 10:47:39 AM »

 Here is a recipe for the Red dyed Pascha Eggs that helped my family greatly when we tried our hands at dyeing "Orthodox Easter Eggs" for our first Pascha 18 years ago.

Red Pascha Eggs
You may want to ask why Red Eggs? Why the Coloring of the pascha eggs"?
 There are several traditions surrounding this coloring of the Pascha Eggs.
1) The red eggs symbolize the resurrection Jesus Christ, red for his blood and egg for life.                                             
2) Another, that shortly after the resurrection, Mary Magdalene traveled to Rome and presented the Emperor with a red egg while exclaiming "Christ is risen"
3) A Pious tradition is that the cracking of eggs symbolizes the shattering of Hades by the victorious Christ.

Ingredients:
•   Uncooked eggs
•   Water
•   3/4 cup Vinegar
•   Red food dye or coloring (Greek Powder Red Food Dye is best but you can also use  lots of American Red Food Coloring and still achieve a nice color by following the instructions below- the secret is to boil the dye into the eggs rather than dunking the eggs as we do in the US)
•   Vegetable oil
•   A few cotton balls

Directions:
1)Carefully wash and dry each egg brought to room temperature [this is an important step, cold eggs have a greater tendency to crack during the cooking process.]
2)Set a large pot of water to boil. Add a red dye or food coloring (water should look beet red]and 3/4 cup of vinegar to the water, and boil for a few minutes.
3)Slowly lower the eggs into the pot, and when the water comes to a boil, lower the heat.
4) Let eggs simmer for 15 min., then remove them carefully from the pot.
5)If you plan to cook more eggs, add an additional 2 tbs. vinegar to the water. And follow the same process.
6) Wipe cooked eggs with an oil-soaked cotton ball, then wipe each egg with a clean dry  cloth leaving a nice shine to the egg.     

Thomas                                                                                                                         


Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
TinaG
I am not a pessimist - I'm just grimly realistic!
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 870


If only my family were this normal !


WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2007, 03:36:12 PM »

Here is a recipe for the Red dyed Pascha Eggs that helped my family greatly when we tried our hands at dyeing "Orthodox Easter Eggs" for our first Pascha 18 years ago.

Red Pascha Eggs

I do have a suggestion that I've gotten from several older ladies when I saw how deep blood red their Pascha eggs were compared to the pinkish-red (easter-eggish)color of mine, no matter how much red food color I used:   The secret is to us brown eggs, not white.  Once dyed and rubbed with a couple of drops of vegetable oil, they look beautiful.
Logged

On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2007, 12:43:26 AM »

Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake

The antecedent of this Greek dish, introduced into Russia during the days of the Byzantine Empire, was translated into Pashka, a molded cheese embellished with candied furits still being served in Russian homes at Easter. Neither of these dishes, despite their names, are cheesecakes in the current sense of the word.

Yield: 12 servings

1 1/2 pounds Ricotta Cheese
2 Tablespoons Honey
1 Tablespoon sweet wine or Cream Sherry
1/4 cup Grated almonds (see note)

Combine the cheese, honey and wine, beating until well blended. Butter a 1-quart decorative
mold and dust with some of the grated almonds. Add the rest of the almonds to the cheese mixture,
blending thoroughly. Press the cheese into the mold firmly and evenly. Run a spatual across the cheese
to smooth the surface. Cover and chill for 24 hours. To serve, dip the mold into hot water for a few seconds,
then invert on a serving plate. Surround with fresh strawberries, peaches, or apricots. Cut into wedges and serve
with a portion of fruit.

Note: chop almonds, place in work bowl of a food processor, and process until a fine dry, meal is formed (1 to 2 minutes).

Logged
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2007, 03:49:36 PM »

 Grin
This looks good and  really simple by comparison to some of the Paschka recipes I have seen. I think I'll try it this year Wink

Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2007, 04:02:25 PM »

Hi Thomas,

It is very simply. It is not real sweet...I prefer it that way. We served it with baked pears that honey drizzled on top before baking. It was perfect combination.

This year I am going to give Paschka a whirl. I just purchased 5 lbs. of baker's Cheese (Russian style) and I borrowed my friend's Paschka mold. We are going to serve it with homemade Greek Easter bread at my brother-in-law's lamb roast on Sunday. Smiley
Logged
TinaG
I am not a pessimist - I'm just grimly realistic!
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 870


If only my family were this normal !


WWW
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2007, 04:44:59 PM »

The most interesting Paskha recipe that I've seen is one I got from a former priest's wife, who in turn got it from a parishioner somewhere up North.  It uses the normal uncooked paskha ingredients, but adds mild white cheddar,  colby or monterrey jack cheese or a combination of each.  It's drier and more firm and just the greatest thing since (or on) sliced bread.  I actually make this version before any others.
Logged

On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2007, 04:50:37 PM »

Hi Thomas,

It is very simply. It is not real sweet...I prefer it that way. We served it with baked pears that honey drizzled on top before baking. It was perfect combination.

This year I am going to give Paschka a whirl. I just purchased 5 lbs. of baker's Cheese (Russian style) and I borrowed my friend's Paschka mold. We are going to serve it with homemade Greek Easter bread at my brother-in-law's lamb roast on Sunday. Smiley

Excellent.

Our former choir director made me a tiny paschka and Greek Easter bread a few years ago.  I figured out later that the bread was NOT kulich.  Greek Easter Bread > kulich.

I bought a Columba Pasquale I'm going to bring some of it to our picnic along with giving the below recipe a whirl (even if it is meant for X-mastime and Pannettone/Pandoro).  I can compare it to the multiple Paschas I will be snagging from various people for comparison.

http://www.cookingwithpatty.com/recipes/desserts/MascarponeCream.php

Logged
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2007, 04:52:26 PM »

The most interesting Paskha recipe that I've seen is one I got from a former priest's wife, who in turn got it from a parishioner somewhere up North.  It uses the normal uncooked paskha ingredients, but adds mild white cheddar,  colby or monterrey jack cheese or a combination of each.  It's drier and more firm and just the greatest thing since (or on) sliced bread.  I actually make this version before any others.

Sounds strange, but I haven't tried it to make that judgement.

I think we need a poll on whether or not firmer or creamier is better.
Logged
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2007, 05:13:45 PM »

Elisha,

I don't know what the difference is between Kulich and Greek Easter bread. Maybe I will try to make the Kulich next year. One thing at a time  Wink plus, I have to make the prosphora this year for the Pascha midnight Liturgy and my dad wants me to make wara anab (lamb dolma) too!

Here is the Pascha Cheese Recipe I will be using. This recipe is from a Carpatho-Russian American choir director at an OCA parish down here in the south bay.

Pascha Cheese

5lbs. Baker's Cheese
1 1/2 pints heavy cream (whipped)
4 1/2 cups sugar
1 2/3 lbs. butter, softened
2 1/2 tsp. vanilla (she also adds one vanilla bean)

Cream butter and sugar thoroughtly. Add cheese and then blend well. Add vanilla. If using vanilla bean, scrape out center of bean and add to mixture. Fold in whipped cream.

Line Pascha mold with several layers of moistened cheesecloth, allowing some cloth to drape over edges. Fill mold with cheese mixture. Fold cloth over cheese mixture. Place lid or dish on top and set a can of fruit or other "weight" on top to slowly press out excess moisture and mold the Pascha. Place the Pascha container onto a deep dish to collect the fluid and store in fridge overnight. Unmold onto a serving platter. The Pascha may be stored in fridge for up to 5 days or in the freezer for longer storage.

Logged
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2007, 05:16:11 PM »

The most interesting Paskha recipe that I've seen is one I got from a former priest's wife, who in turn got it from a parishioner somewhere up North.  It uses the normal uncooked paskha ingredients, but adds mild white cheddar,  colby or monterrey jack cheese or a combination of each.  It's drier and more firm and just the greatest thing since (or on) sliced bread.  I actually make this version before any others.

Wow! I have collected some varied Pascha recipes but none of them have those cheeses in the recipe. Is finshed product sweet?
Logged
TinaG
I am not a pessimist - I'm just grimly realistic!
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 870


If only my family were this normal !


WWW
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2007, 05:46:07 PM »

Wow! I have collected some varied Pascha recipes but none of them have those cheeses in the recipe. Is finshed product sweet?

Well, it is once you've added a pound of confectioner's sugar!!  It's totally addictive.  The cheese gives it a pretty pale yellow color.  It really puts back all the weight I loose for Great Lent.   I'll post the recipe tonight when I get home from Bridegroom services.  My kulich recipe and a sour cream based Paskha recipe I got years ago from an old Time Life cookbook called American Heritage cookbook or something like that.  It has chapters on American food history, the major ethnic groups in America, their immigration stories, and a selection of recipes. 

Actually this year I've gotten so busy with work, my kid's baseball practices and my kung fu, I may cheat and buy some brioche or challah to substitute for kulich.  I know that sounds horrible, but I am not going to kill myself.  I get so stressed out at the last minute and just run out of time.   My mistake was not starting my baking 4 weeks ago and freezing the kulich and finikia.  Good thing about Pascha though, it will come again next year and I'll be better prepared.
Logged

On the spiritual path somewhere between the Simpsons and St. Theophan the Recluse, but I still can't see the Springfield city limits sign yet.
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2007, 06:31:32 PM »

Elisha,

I don't know what the difference is between Kulich and Greek Easter bread. Maybe I will try to make the Kulich next year. One thing at a time  Wink plus, I have to make the prosphora this year for the Pascha midnight Liturgy and my dad wants me to make wara anab (lamb dolma) too!


Greek Easter Bread is braided, soft, moist and slightly sweet, while kulic is made to be more like a tower and is a lot drier.
Logged
Donna Rose
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 937


« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2007, 08:06:08 PM »

Tamara (and anyone else who can offer the following information),

So, I am relatively new to Orthodoxy as well as the ethnic traditions (cooking and otherwise) that often go with it, this year being my second Pascha as a member of the Church. The Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake actually sounds like something I have the capability to make, and there is a party on Bright Week that a family in my parish is having at their home and I would love to be able to bring something with me when I go. My question, though, is this: my parish is very Slavic, and I hear the women talking about Paskha bread all the time, and I know there will be several kinds at the party. If I make this recipe, what do I go in calling it? Is it in fact Paskha, or shall I just say it's Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake? I know this sounds like an obvious question, but I don't want to embarrass myself by bringing something about which I know next to nothing, in terms of the traditional significance. Can you tell me a little more about it?

Anybody who knows about Paskha bread, as well as the various Greek versions of the same, and specifically what the posted recipe for Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake would fall under, can chime in. Smiley

Thanks in advance!

Donna
Logged

hmmmm...
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2007, 09:29:42 PM »

Tamara (and anyone else who can offer the following information),

So, I am relatively new to Orthodoxy as well as the ethnic traditions (cooking and otherwise) that often go with it, this year being my second Pascha as a member of the Church. The Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake actually sounds like something I have the capability to make, and there is a party on Bright Week that a family in my parish is having at their home and I would love to be able to bring something with me when I go. My question, though, is this: my parish is very Slavic, and I hear the women talking about Paskha bread all the time, and I know there will be several kinds at the party. If I make this recipe, what do I go in calling it? Is it in fact Paskha, or shall I just say it's Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake? I know this sounds like an obvious question, but I don't want to embarrass myself by bringing something about which I know next to nothing, in terms of the traditional significance. Can you tell me a little more about it?

Anybody who knows about Paskha bread, as well as the various Greek versions of the same, and specifically what the posted recipe for Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake would fall under, can chime in. Smiley

Thanks in advance!

Donna

I would just call it a Greek Molded Honey Cheesecake not a Greek version of Pascha. Because if there are many Slavic folks in your church I don't know if you want to tell them Russian Pascha is an evolution of this Greek dessert. They might think you are under the spell of another Mr. Portakalos who believes everything of value in the world is derived from the Greeks!  Cheesy Also, this dessert will not look like a Russian Cheese Pascha.
My sister's father-in-law is Greek and he loves to go on and tell our boys about how the Greeks are the source of everything! He once told them a story about how Christopher Columbus is in fact a Byzantine Greek prince from Chios named Christophoros Columbus. LOL!!!


Anyway, here is a picture of Greek Easter Bread. It is as Elisha described it. Moist, slightly sweet, braided bread with red eggs
placed around it.


This is a picture of Kulich. I can't remember what it tastes like but I think I ate many years ago. Elisha said it is much drier than the Greek bread.
Logged
Donna Rose
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 937


« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2007, 09:38:43 PM »

Wonderful, thanks for the explanation! What you described was exactly what I was worried about -- I don't want to call it a Greek version of Paskha and then have to explain where that idea came from! I'll just say it's a Greek recipe and leave it at that -- assuming I can find the time on Pascha Sunday to prepare it so it can set in the fridge for 24 hours before the party! Smiley

Donna
Logged

hmmmm...
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2007, 10:03:12 AM »

Too busy to make pascha Breads?  Take one loaf of  Kings Hawaian Bread, make a hollow the size of one egg place a dyed red egg in the hollow.  This will make a sweet pascha bread that has the red egg that you will not be embarrased about and tastes very good. It looks good and tastes mildly sweet like Greek Tsoureki Bread.We have also used this bread decorated with a little frosting in place of  Vasilopita at New Years when my wife and I have been really busy. Single Guys wanting to take something to the Feast or for the Agape picnic this works great. Again this is a substitute if you are too busy to bake or unable to bake.  It will never fully take the pace of traditional Greek or Russian Pascha breads,

1 egg represents the one triune God, two eggs christ as God-Man and three eggs in the loaf represent the Persons of the Holy trinity.

Thomas
« Last Edit: June 26, 2007, 10:43:21 AM by Thomas » Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #24 on: April 10, 2007, 12:05:37 PM »

Just as a follow-up for that Russian Cheese Pascha recipe posted....

It is delicious...everyone loved it. But it makes two big paschas....not one! I took one to my brother-in-law's house
and luckily there were 60 people there wasn't much left. Yesterday I cut up the other one and made two smaller
paschas. I then carefully wrapped them up and put them in the freezer. I will take them to coffee hour over the next
few weeks and share them with my friends at church.
Logged
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2007, 03:06:46 AM »

Grape leaves (Wara anab) Syrian recipe

Fresh grape leaves (100 approximately)
or two 24 oz. glass jars of grape leaves

3 lbs of lamb de-boned (ask the butcher to package small lamb bones, you will need them)
salt and pepper to taste
juice of two lemons
2 1/2 cups of rice

If using fresh leaves soak in hot water for 15 minutes to soften. Remove from water and spin in a salad spinner. If using canned leaves rinse in fresh water to remove excess salt. Then spin carefully in a salad spinner.

Stuffing: After cutting off excess fat grind the lamb. Add the rice and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well.

In a large pot place the small cut-up lamb bones. I then place a vegetable steamer on top of bones. To begin stuffing grape leaves, cut off long stems. Place one tablespoon of stuffing across each leaf in a long thin line. Fold end of leaf over meat, then fold edges of the leaf toward the inside. Roll the leaf to the end fairly tightly. Arrange rolled leaves on top of the vegetable steamer. When you are done rolling leaves, press stuffed leaves down with an inverted plate to keep the leaves in place so they will not unroll while cooking. Add water till it reaches the plate. Add the juice of the lemons to the water. Cover pot and bring to boil. Then reduce heat to a simmer and let cook for 45 minutes.
After 45 minutes taste one to make sure the rice is cooked all the way through. When grape leaves are done cooking I remove and place grape leaves in corning ware dishes. I then reserve enough of the juice from the pot in a separate glass container. If you have leftover grape leaves you can add this juice to them when warming them up.  Otherwise, they will taste dry.
Logged
monkvasyl
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: UOC 0f USA
Posts: 653



« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2007, 01:02:02 PM »

CHRIST IS RISEN!

If you are interested in a simple recipe for Pascha Cheese...actually I'd call it a lazy man's recipe.  I got it from a priest, who in turn got it from a Bishop.  It doesn't beat the real recipe, but in a pinch its darn close.

But for some reason, as I try to cut and paste it here, most of the recipe doesn't show.  I'll try to post it separately.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2007, 01:08:20 PM by monkvasyl » Logged

The unworthy hierodeacon, Vasyl
Elisha
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 4,411


« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2007, 01:08:56 PM »

This is a picture of Kulich. I can't remember what it tastes like but I think I ate many years ago. Elisha said it is much drier than the Greek bread.

Definitely.  The Colomba Pasquale I bought at the Italian deli (Pascal Dove - Italian Easter Bread) is vastly superior to kulich.  I have a small kulich in my freezer anyway to eat up with some Crema di Mascarpone to put on it.  Yum.
Logged
monkvasyl
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: UOC 0f USA
Posts: 653



« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2007, 01:10:11 PM »

CHRIST IS RISEN!

I hope it goes throught, this time...

SYRNA PASCHA

Boil 12 eggs, Sieve yolks (no whites needed)
Cream butter, 8oz (unsalted), Add softened Philly Cream cheese, 8oz
Add Ricotta (whole milk) cheese, 1 1/2 cups
Add yolks, Add 1/2 cup of sugar, and 1/2 to 3/4 tsp of vanilla (to taste)
Mix as you add each ingredient and finally place in a bowl, with holes, in the bottom, lined with cheese cloth.
Place a heavy weigh on top to help it drain.  Place in fridge for a  couple of days.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2007, 01:16:27 PM by monkvasyl » Logged

The unworthy hierodeacon, Vasyl
ozgeorge
I'll take you for who you are if you take me for everything.
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Oecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the New Rome, the Great Church of Christ.
Posts: 16,382


My plans for retirement.


WWW
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2007, 08:34:11 PM »

I've heard of that.  Would you please share your recipe?

CHILI HOT CHOCOLATE

2 cups milk (soy milk gives a nice malted flavour)
1/2 a split vanilla bean
1 red chili, split and seeds removed
1 cinnamon stick
50g (about 1.5oz) grated dark chocolate


Warm the milk, vanilla bean, chili and cinnamon over a low heat without boiling. Add grated chocolate and stir until melted. Strain into mugs. Serves 2.
Logged

If you're living a happy life as a Christian, you're doing something wrong.
ozgeorge
I'll take you for who you are if you take me for everything.
Hoplitarches
*************
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Oecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the New Rome, the Great Church of Christ.
Posts: 16,382


My plans for retirement.


WWW
« Reply #30 on: June 25, 2007, 06:14:59 AM »

Russians also have a wonderful non-alcoholic summer beverage called "kvas." It is made of bread, it has a rich dark brown color, it is served ice-cold, and it tastes divine! (A disclaimer: I am a Ukrainian - which is different from Russian, - and I am NOT a brown-noser regarding things Russian, but this one, uhhhhhhh.... Smiley Smiley Smiley

KVAS

500g (about 1 pound) stale black bread or stale pumpernickel bread
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon sugar (extra)
2 tablespoons raisins
2 tablespoons fresh mint leaves or 1 tablespoon dried mint leaves
2 tablespoons dry yeast
6 litres (a little less than 6 quarts) water
1/2 cup luke warm water extra


Preheat oven to 95 degrees Celcius (200 degrees Fahrenheit)  Cube the bread and then spread on a cookie sheet and place in oven for 1 hour.
Boil 6 litres of water and drop in the bread.
Remove from heat, cover with a towel, and allow to sit at room temperature for 8
hours.
Strain through cheesecloth or a fine sieve and press the juice from the bread.
Sprinkle the yeast and a teaspoon of sugar in 1/2 cup of lukewarm water and stir to dissolve the yeast completely. Set aside in a warm place covered 10-15 minutes or until mixture becomes frothy, then add to the liquid.
Add the mint leaves, and remaining sugar, stir well, then re-cover with the
towel and set aside for 8-12 hours more at room temperature.

Again strain the mixture through a fine seive. Pour into a wide mouthed container, add the raisins, cover the top with plastic wrap, secure with a rubber band, and place in cool (not cold), spot for 4-5 days or until the raisins are floating and the sediment has sunk to the bottom.

Pour off the clear amber liquid and rebottle in a clean jug or bottles. Refrigerate until ready to use. Kvas is both a beverage and can be used as a soup stock.
Logged

If you're living a happy life as a Christian, you're doing something wrong.
ytterbiumanalyst
Professor Emeritus, CSA
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the Midwest
Posts: 8,790



« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2007, 08:32:18 AM »

Sicilian shells
(with apologies to actual Sicilians)

8 oz. pasta shells
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt
8 oz. mozzerella cheese
5-6 mushrooms
3 oz. leaf spinach
12-15 Kalamata olives
24 oz. marinara sauce
Fresh Paramesan cheese

1. Boil the pasta shells in water, with a dash of olive oil and salt (These add flavour and prevent the water over-boiling).
2. Chop up the vegetables, and mix them into the mozzerella. By now the shells should be boiled.
3. Remove the shells from the water, drain, and place open side up into a large Pyrex baking pan. Wait a minute for the shells to cool, then stuff them with the cheese/vegetable mixture.
4. Pour the marinara over all of the shells, then grate the paramesan cheese over the top.
5. Bake at 375 degrees about 45 minutes or until the cheese begins to brown.
Logged

"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2007, 08:57:34 AM »

This thread is killing me...the fast has so long to go!

Last night while I was preparing haluski I couldn't get Veniamin's chili recipe out of my mind.  Embarrassed
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
Heorhij
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOA, for now, but my heart belongs to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church
Posts: 8,576



WWW
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2007, 12:59:32 PM »

This thread is killing me...the fast has so long to go!

Last night while I was preparing haluski I couldn't get Veniamin's chili recipe out of my mind.  Embarrassed

Halushki is SOOOOOO Ukrainian... kinda like "whisky" without "e" is Scotch. Smiley
Logged

Love never fails.
Carpatho Russian
Site Supporter
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 285


Glory to Jesus Christ! Glory for ever!


« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2007, 09:31:17 PM »

Thanks for mentioning halushki.
I stopped at the green grocer on the way home from work today and picked up a head of cabbage and then off to the Hungarian store for dried Hungarian dumplings - Halushki!
Ahh, comfort food!
Logged

Zastupnice christianov nepostydnaja, chodatajice ko Tvorcu nepreložnaja, ne prezri hr’išnych molenij hlasy, popredvari jako blahaja na pomošč nas, virno vopijuščich ti: Uskori na molitvu, i potščisja na umolenije, zastupajušči prisno Bohorodice, čtuščich t’a.
jmbejdl
Count-Palatine James the Spurious of Giggleswick on the Naze
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Church of Romania
Posts: 1,480


Great Martyr St. John the New of Suceava


« Reply #35 on: June 27, 2007, 06:07:11 AM »

Amazingly (considering how much I like food!), this is the first time I've looked at this thread. I couldn't help but notice all the talk of Russian Pashka and Greek Easter bread and note that, once again, Romania is somewhere in the middle. Does anyone here (other than the Romanians, of course), know Romanian Pasca? I make it every year, but I'll need to consult a recipe to get the proportions right.

To give a rough description, though, it's a very rich, eggy yeast dough (rather like panettone but minus the fruit), made into a flat, round almost flan-like base and trimmed with a plaited edge. In the middle you put a mixture of (most commonly but there are other variants), branza de vaca (a pretty soft, crumbly, white cow's cheese used for sweets in Romania - the best substitute I've found in Britain is Ricotta, though you need to drain it or it's too wet), a handful of raisins, some flour, eggs, sugar, vanilla and lemon zest, finish it off with a cross of plaited dough and a washing of egg yolk and then bake the whole thing in the oven. It's wonderful.

I'll also try to get a recipe for Cozonac (which I make at Christmas - it's a similar dough to the Pasca and the version I make - because I like it best - is made in a square, covered with a paste of walnuts, icing sugar and milk and rolled up like a Swiss role before baking) and mici otherwise known as mititei, which are small 'sausages' of mince meat, herbs, spices and a lot of garlic, cooked over charcoal - the best thing about summer in Romania. I might even throw in my wife's recipe for piftele (chiftele as they are called by non-Moldovans, I believe) assuming she lets me.

James
Logged

We owe greater gratitude to those who humble us, wrong us, and douse us with venom, than to those who nurse us with honour and sweet words, or feed us with tasty food and confections, for bile is the best medicine for our soul. - Elder Paisios of Mount Athos
ytterbiumanalyst
Professor Emeritus, CSA
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the Midwest
Posts: 8,790



« Reply #36 on: June 27, 2007, 08:22:22 PM »

kinda like "whisky" without "e" is Scotch. Smiley

There's whisky that's not Scotch? Oh, you must mean this "bourbon" drink. Actually, that's in the same family as water.
Logged

"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2007, 10:18:12 PM »

There's whisky that's not Scotch? Oh, you must mean this "bourbon" drink. Actually, that's in the same family as water.
Fret not, my friend. There is no whisky that is not Scotch (even if our spell-checker does complain about a missing "e".

Wonder if any Irish come here?
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #38 on: June 28, 2007, 08:32:08 AM »

I hate Scotch (nasty) give me a good Irish one anytime---family history ya know.

Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #39 on: June 28, 2007, 10:31:43 AM »

I hate Scotch (nasty) give me a good Irish one anytime---family history ya know.

Thomas

 Grin
Knew there some Irish here...

Expanding the alcoholic beverage theme a bit, my wife informed me last night that I have prepared no wine for the feast. She even went as far as to gather all the items necessary (primary and secondary fermenters, cleaning brushes and solutions, Brix tester, air-locks, yeasts, various other additives like yeast nutrients, tannic acid, etc, pursuant to my completing the request. How I'm going to produce something potable in so short a time I've no idea. This morning she even requested the varieties - cranberry/raisin and blueberry. It's going to be a long day...
Too bad vinavera grapes are so expensive. REAL wine...yum.
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
Thomas
Section Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,790



« Reply #40 on: June 28, 2007, 01:57:09 PM »

Does celebrating the Feast on the Old calendar give you enough time---I don't know if you have time to make it in time for the new calendar.

Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Αριστοκλής
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Catholic
Jurisdiction: American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese
Posts: 10,026


« Reply #41 on: June 28, 2007, 02:13:59 PM »

Civil July 12th? No way.
It will barely be ready for first porting in secondary fermentation. Best I can do is point at the fermenters and say, "See, honey, still working. Must go to store and buy a couple of bottles of 'Russian River Chardonnay' and 'make do' "...(hehe)

Anyway, I've run into a snag today...water. Can't use this dreadful chlorinated municipal stuff. On the farm I just used our own spring water. Must go buy distilled now.
Logged

"Religion is a neurobiological illness and Orthodoxy is its cure." - Fr. John S. Romanides
Tamara
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian Orthodox Diocese of America
Posts: 2,208


+Pray for Orthodox Unity+


« Reply #42 on: September 27, 2007, 12:15:21 AM »

Found this recipe in Sunset magazine and made the cookies on Sunday. My sons, nephews and husband almost ate the whole batch in one sitting. Very spicy for the fall days coming ahead. I think I might make them at Christmas too.

Ginger Chocolate Cookies

3/4 cup unsalted butter
2 cups flour
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 1/2 T ground ginger
2 tsp. baking soda
1 1/2 tsp each cinnamon and ground nutmeg
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup molasses
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
8 oz. bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped (I used semi-sweet chocolate chips)

1/3 cup granulated sugar to roll cookie dough balls in before baking

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a large baking sheet. In a medium bowl, whisk flour, cocoa powder, ginger, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt until thoroughly combined. Set aside.

2. In a large bowl, beat 3/4 cup butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy (about 3 minutes). Add molasses, egg, and vanilla; beat to combine.

3. Mix in dry ingredients gently but thoroughly, scraping down sides of the bowl as necessary. (Batter will be thick) Stir in chopped chocolate (or chocolate chips) until well combined.

4. Form batter into 2-tbsp. balls, roll each ball in granulated sugar, and place 12 balls on buttered baking sheet. (If batter is too sticky, dampen your hands with water when forming balls.) Dip the bottom of a cup or glass in water and use it to flatten balls to a thickness of about 1/4 inch, rewetting glass as necessary to prevent sticking.

5. Bake cookies 5 minutes, turn pan 180 degrees, and bake until just set, about 5 minutes more. Cool on pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to cooling racks. Repeat forming and baking with remaining balls of dough. Makes 36 cookies.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2007, 12:20:51 AM by Tamara » Logged
Ian Lazarus
The Main Man!
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: AOA
Posts: 1,545


yIjah, Qey' 'oH!


« Reply #43 on: September 27, 2007, 12:40:04 AM »

Ginger Chocolate Cinnamon Shake

WARNING!  THIS IS ONLY TO BE CONSUMED ONCE A YEAR! 

1 pint Chocolate cookie dough Ice Cream

1/2 cup cold milk

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

3-4 ginerbread cookies

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

chocolate for shaving.


Combine ingredients in a blender.  Set to crush, then to blend.  Pour.  Whip cream the top and shave chocolate (preferably dark chocolate.)  Eat!

Logged

"For I am With thee, withersoever thou goest"

Joshua 1:9
ytterbiumanalyst
Professor Emeritus, CSA
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the Midwest
Posts: 8,790



« Reply #44 on: September 28, 2007, 07:25:37 AM »

^ Yay! I have an excuse to use my new Korintje Cinnamon. It's edible incense.
Logged

"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
Tags: Feast recipe Food 
Pages: 1 2 3 »  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.14 seconds with 71 queries.