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Poll
Question: What language(s) can you speak/write in (does not need to be fluent)?
English - 151 (31.9%)
Greek - 43 (9.1%)
A Slavic Language - 46 (9.7%)
Romanian - 9 (1.9%)
Spanish/Spanish Derivitive - 44 (9.3%)
Romance (Italian, French, etc) - 52 (11%)
German/Germanic - 37 (7.8%)
Swahili/African - 3 (0.6%)
Arabic - 19 (4%)
Coptic - 6 (1.3%)
Klingon/Binary/Other Artificial Language - 15 (3.2%)
Not listed.  Boo! - 49 (10.3%)
Total Voters: 164

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ChristusDominus
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« Reply #90 on: March 28, 2010, 05:21:00 PM »

I'm another one that loves languages.  I'd like to learn Latin (more than the ecclesiastical Latin I learned in school) and Greek, for starters.  And, although I'm fluent in Portuguese and it is my first language, I'd like to perfect my vocabulary skills. Smiley

Can I ask you then, how alike are Portuguese and Spanish? I've never known if they're quite close or more distant, like French and Italian?

I've heard people speaking Portuguese and it sounded beautiful though  Smiley


Liz, here, where I live (a small college town in Mississippi, USA), I know a woman from Brazil (of course a native Portuguese speaker) who married a man from Puerto Rico (of course a native Spanish speaker). She says that it took them some time to adjust to each other when they were dating, so that they even had to use some English to clarify their points. But now, when it's been a good number of years and they have two kids, they understand each other very well when each of them speaks his/her own language.  
I have family and friends from Brazil.  There is a vast difference between Portuguese spoken in Portugal and Portuguese spoken in Brazil.  And, the Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico is significantly different from Spanish spoken in Spain or even Mexico.  Both are dialects of the mother tongue and use slang abundantly.  That slang has become part of the vernacular.  I can truly say, it is easier for me to understand Spanish than it is to understand Brazilian Portuguese.  And, unless my Puerto Rican friends slow down their Spanish and pronounce all the letters in their words (which they often don't), then all is lost.  Grin
I disagree, Latin American Spanish is much clearer than Iberian Spanish. Yet I converse with with friends from Spain all the time and we understand  each other perfectly. They are not dialects. It is like American English and British English, same difference. Different ways of expressing oneself but it is the same language, Castilian.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2010, 05:21:59 PM by ChristusDominus » Logged

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« Reply #91 on: March 28, 2010, 06:45:04 PM »

However, it is much easier for Portuguese speakers to understand the Spanish language than the reverse.

A former schoolmate (from Peru) would echo your sentiments: he spoke Portuguese and Spanish (and Basque, to boot) and said that those who spoke the former could usually understand the latter without formal training, but not vice-versa.
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ChristusDominus
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« Reply #92 on: March 29, 2010, 03:36:33 PM »

However, it is much easier for Portuguese speakers to understand the Spanish language than the reverse.

A former schoolmate (from Peru) would echo your sentiments: he spoke Portuguese and Spanish (and Basque, to boot) and said that those who spoke the former could usually understand the latter without formal training, but not vice-versa.
Unless you speak Galician (Gallego), spoken in Northwest Spain and other regions. It is closely related to Portuguese. More so than Castilian Spanish. Smiley

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galego
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain)
« Last Edit: March 29, 2010, 03:39:16 PM by ChristusDominus » Logged

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« Reply #93 on: April 07, 2010, 09:20:58 PM »

However, it is much easier for Portuguese speakers to understand the Spanish language than the reverse.

A former schoolmate (from Peru) would echo your sentiments: he spoke Portuguese and Spanish (and Basque, to boot) and said that those who spoke the former could usually understand the latter without formal training, but not vice-versa.
Unless you speak Galician (Gallego), spoken in Northwest Spain and other regions. It is closely related to Portuguese. More so than Castilian Spanish. Smiley

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galego
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain)
sadly That's one language that I'll never learn, the language of my forefathers.  Sad
Galiz.
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« Reply #94 on: April 07, 2010, 09:27:32 PM »

However, it is much easier for Portuguese speakers to understand the Spanish language than the reverse.

A former schoolmate (from Peru) would echo your sentiments: he spoke Portuguese and Spanish (and Basque, to boot) and said that those who spoke the former could usually understand the latter without formal training, but not vice-versa.
OMG that guy is like me except that he speaks basque.
Basque and Galician.   Embarrassed
Why did God have to take away Basque away from me? it's so cool and mighty. it's awesome beyond belief.
it has at least 45 noun declensions. while Greek has 15.
Your friend is so lucky.
I wish I could talk to that guy.
Euskadi....
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« Reply #95 on: April 07, 2010, 11:20:30 PM »

I'm another one that loves languages.  I'd like to learn Latin (more than the ecclesiastical Latin I learned in school) and Greek, for starters.  And, although I'm fluent in Portuguese and it is my first language, I'd like to perfect my vocabulary skills. Smiley

Can I ask you then, how alike are Portuguese and Spanish? I've never known if they're quite close or more distant, like French and Italian?

I've heard people speaking Portuguese and it sounded beautiful though  Smiley


Liz, here, where I live (a small college town in Mississippi, USA), I know a woman from Brazil (of course a native Portuguese speaker) who married a man from Puerto Rico (of course a native Spanish speaker). She says that it took them some time to adjust to each other when they were dating, so that they even had to use some English to clarify their points. But now, when it's been a good number of years and they have two kids, they understand each other very well when each of them speaks his/her own language.  
I have family and friends from Brazil.  There is a vast difference between Portuguese spoken in Portugal and Portuguese spoken in Brazil.  And, the Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico is significantly different from Spanish spoken in Spain or even Mexico.  Both are dialects of the mother tongue and use slang abundantly.  That slang has become part of the vernacular.  I can truly say, it is easier for me to understand Spanish than it is to understand Brazilian Portuguese.  And, unless my Puerto Rican friends slow down their Spanish and pronounce all the letters in their words (which they often don't), then all is lost.  Grin
I disagree, Latin American Spanish is much clearer than Iberian Spanish. Yet I converse with with friends from Spain all the time and we understand  each other perfectly. They are not dialects. It is like American English and British English, same difference. Different ways of expressing oneself but it is the same language, Castilian.
I am not sure what is meant by the term dialect. for example, isn't standard American English a dialect of the English language?
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ChristusDominus
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« Reply #96 on: April 08, 2010, 12:16:41 AM »

OMG that guy is like me except that he speaks basque.
Basque and Galician.   Embarrassed
Why did God have to take away Basque away from me? it's so cool and mighty. it's awesome beyond belief.
it has at least 45 noun declensions. while Greek has 15.
Your friend is so lucky.
I wish I could talk to that guy.
Euskadi....
Are you a Vasco? Both my parents had Basque surnames but I don't consider myself Basque becasue I was not born in the Basque country nor do I speak the language. But Galician is quite different than Basque. I am sure you know that Basque is not a Latin based language. Supposedly, it is a pre-roman language of unknown origin. But my real question is this: How did God take Basque away from you? I'm just a bit curious.
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« Reply #97 on: April 08, 2010, 12:19:02 AM »

However, it is much easier for Portuguese speakers to understand the Spanish language than the reverse.

A former schoolmate (from Peru) would echo your sentiments: he spoke Portuguese and Spanish (and Basque, to boot) and said that those who spoke the former could usually understand the latter without formal training, but not vice-versa.
Unless you speak Galician (Gallego), spoken in Northwest Spain and other regions. It is closely related to Portuguese. More so than Castilian Spanish. Smiley

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galego
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain)
sadly That's one language that I'll never learn, the language of my forefathers.  Sad
Galiz.
Ok, so you're Galego?
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« Reply #98 on: April 08, 2010, 01:51:43 AM »

However, it is much easier for Portuguese speakers to understand the Spanish language than the reverse.

A former schoolmate (from Peru) would echo your sentiments: he spoke Portuguese and Spanish (and Basque, to boot) and said that those who spoke the former could usually understand the latter without formal training, but not vice-versa.
Unless you speak Galician (Gallego), spoken in Northwest Spain and other regions. It is closely related to Portuguese. More so than Castilian Spanish. Smiley

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galego
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain)
sadly That's one language that I'll never learn, the language of my forefathers.  Sad
Galiz.
Ok, so you're Galego?
yeah, since I'm Galician, I'm Spanish and Portuguese all at the same time, and possibly Celtic, which I doubt because my last name sounds more Roman than Celtic.
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« Reply #99 on: April 29, 2010, 08:35:43 PM »

My native language is Portuguese, and my second language is English.

I have some formal education in Spanish and French.

I can (barely) understand most Romance languages (except Romenian, probably due to lack of contact with it) and even try to communicate back.

Galician is very close to Portuguese and although it requires more attention than usual, if the two parts are willing we can have a conversation.

I can read phonetically Greek, Russian and Ukrainian (side-effects of my conversion to Orthodoxy) and I hope to learn at least one of those fluently in the future.

I can play reading basic Latin as well.

I had some basic lessons of Japanese but forgot most of it. When my nissei friend says some sentences I understand the most basic phrases.

I'm not too keen of made-up languages like Quenya or Esperanto.

I know Cobol, RPG, and I'm learning Java.
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« Reply #100 on: January 06, 2011, 10:01:31 AM »

I'm learning Chinese this semester at college. Beautiful language!! Grin

Yay!  I always wanted to learn Chinese.  It is beautiful and very subtle.

Chinese?  Beautiful?

If you say so  Cheesy
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« Reply #101 on: January 06, 2011, 11:10:37 AM »

Native language is Greek, but I am also fluent in English, French and have some knowledge of German.
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« Reply #102 on: January 06, 2011, 11:26:51 AM »

I'm a little jealous for those of you who have English as your native language. It must be useful to have Lingua franca of practically the whole World as your birthright.
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« Reply #103 on: January 06, 2011, 03:41:55 PM »

I'm a little jealous for those of you who have English as your native language. It must be useful to have Lingua franca of practically the whole World as your birthright.

I always get a kick of hearing English as the lingua franca of the world. An Italian phrase to call English Frankish.
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« Reply #104 on: January 06, 2011, 03:50:47 PM »

I'm another one that loves languages.  I'd like to learn Latin (more than the ecclesiastical Latin I learned in school) and Greek, for starters.  And, although I'm fluent in Portuguese and it is my first language, I'd like to perfect my vocabulary skills. Smiley

Can I ask you then, how alike are Portuguese and Spanish? I've never known if they're quite close or more distant, like French and Italian?

I've heard people speaking Portuguese and it sounded beautiful though  Smiley


Liz, here, where I live (a small college town in Mississippi, USA), I know a woman from Brazil (of course a native Portuguese speaker) who married a man from Puerto Rico (of course a native Spanish speaker). She says that it took them some time to adjust to each other when they were dating, so that they even had to use some English to clarify their points. But now, when it's been a good number of years and they have two kids, they understand each other very well when each of them speaks his/her own language.  
I have family and friends from Brazil.  There is a vast difference between Portuguese spoken in Portugal and Portuguese spoken in Brazil.  And, the Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico is significantly different from Spanish spoken in Spain or even Mexico.  Both are dialects of the mother tongue and use slang abundantly.  That slang has become part of the vernacular.  I can truly say, it is easier for me to understand Spanish than it is to understand Brazilian Portuguese.  And, unless my Puerto Rican friends slow down their Spanish and pronounce all the letters in their words (which they often don't), then all is lost.  Grin
I disagree, Latin American Spanish is much clearer than Iberian Spanish. Yet I converse with with friends from Spain all the time and we understand  each other perfectly. They are not dialects. It is like American English and British English, same difference. Different ways of expressing oneself but it is the same language, Castilian.
I am not sure what is meant by the term dialect. for example, isn't standard American English a dialect of the English language?

No. What a dialect is, is controversial. Check out wikipedia per usual.

I can speak and write standard "High German" and standard "Austrian". There are small differences. I can speak Salzburgerisch. It is a dialect. Its grammar, lexicon, etc. is very different from either of the above. It is a regional manner of speech held over from Middle High German. Speaking Salzburgerish around a buncha Germans other than those from Bayern (Bayerisch is similar) they will understand next to nill. Likewise, if my friends and I travel to Vorarlberg we will understand very little of their dialect.

Often what English speakers call "dialect" is nothing other than their standard language peppered with regionalisms.

For a good example of true English dialect see Cockney, when being unforgiving to outsiders in their speech, they are almost nearly impossible to understand by other English speakers.
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« Reply #105 on: February 14, 2011, 08:03:15 PM »

I can do spanish pretty well.
I should, after four years of High School Spanish.
I used to study Romanian, but I stopped. I'm wanting to start again, as it's a beautiful language.
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« Reply #106 on: February 14, 2011, 08:37:31 PM »

English (apparently). German (lots of fun!)

I know Koine, but I think we're just talking about spoken languages here.

Also French, but only good enough to read...never got the opportunity to develop aural skills in French.
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« Reply #107 on: February 15, 2011, 03:48:43 AM »

I'm another one that loves languages.  I'd like to learn Latin (more than the ecclesiastical Latin I learned in school) and Greek, for starters.  And, although I'm fluent in Portuguese and it is my first language, I'd like to perfect my vocabulary skills. Smiley

Can I ask you then, how alike are Portuguese and Spanish? I've never known if they're quite close or more distant, like French and Italian?

I've heard people speaking Portuguese and it sounded beautiful though  Smiley


Liz, here, where I live (a small college town in Mississippi, USA), I know a woman from Brazil (of course a native Portuguese speaker) who married a man from Puerto Rico (of course a native Spanish speaker). She says that it took them some time to adjust to each other when they were dating, so that they even had to use some English to clarify their points. But now, when it's been a good number of years and they have two kids, they understand each other very well when each of them speaks his/her own language.  
I have family and friends from Brazil.  There is a vast difference between Portuguese spoken in Portugal and Portuguese spoken in Brazil.  And, the Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico is significantly different from Spanish spoken in Spain or even Mexico.  Both are dialects of the mother tongue and use slang abundantly.  That slang has become part of the vernacular.  I can truly say, it is easier for me to understand Spanish than it is to understand Brazilian Portuguese.  And, unless my Puerto Rican friends slow down their Spanish and pronounce all the letters in their words (which they often don't), then all is lost.  Grin
I disagree, Latin American Spanish is much clearer than Iberian Spanish. Yet I converse with with friends from Spain all the time and we understand  each other perfectly. They are not dialects. It is like American English and British English, same difference. Different ways of expressing oneself but it is the same language, Castilian.
I am not sure what is meant by the term dialect. for example, isn't standard American English a dialect of the English language?

No. What a dialect is, is controversial. Check out wikipedia per usual.
I find that  wikipedia states point blank that standard American English may be said to be a standard dialect of the English language.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect
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« Reply #108 on: February 15, 2011, 01:49:51 PM »

I'm another one that loves languages.  I'd like to learn Latin (more than the ecclesiastical Latin I learned in school) and Greek, for starters.  And, although I'm fluent in Portuguese and it is my first language, I'd like to perfect my vocabulary skills. Smiley

Can I ask you then, how alike are Portuguese and Spanish? I've never known if they're quite close or more distant, like French and Italian?

I've heard people speaking Portuguese and it sounded beautiful though  Smiley


Liz, here, where I live (a small college town in Mississippi, USA), I know a woman from Brazil (of course a native Portuguese speaker) who married a man from Puerto Rico (of course a native Spanish speaker). She says that it took them some time to adjust to each other when they were dating, so that they even had to use some English to clarify their points. But now, when it's been a good number of years and they have two kids, they understand each other very well when each of them speaks his/her own language.  
I have family and friends from Brazil.  There is a vast difference between Portuguese spoken in Portugal and Portuguese spoken in Brazil.  And, the Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico is significantly different from Spanish spoken in Spain or even Mexico.  Both are dialects of the mother tongue and use slang abundantly.  That slang has become part of the vernacular.  I can truly say, it is easier for me to understand Spanish than it is to understand Brazilian Portuguese.  And, unless my Puerto Rican friends slow down their Spanish and pronounce all the letters in their words (which they often don't), then all is lost.  Grin
I disagree, Latin American Spanish is much clearer than Iberian Spanish. Yet I converse with with friends from Spain all the time and we understand  each other perfectly. They are not dialects. It is like American English and British English, same difference. Different ways of expressing oneself but it is the same language, Castilian.
I am not sure what is meant by the term dialect. for example, isn't standard American English a dialect of the English language?

No. What a dialect is, is controversial. Check out wikipedia per usual.
I find that  wikipedia states point blank that standard American English may be said to be a standard dialect of the English language.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect


wikipedia is hardly the end of discussion on the matter of any subject. If you do read the article and the appropriate linked articles, you will find that it states the definition of "dialect" is a matter of controversy.

You will see some of my ideas of what dialect means to me in my posts above.

The fact that a region of America calls a can of Coca-Cola a soda, another a pop, another, a coke, etc. does not a dialect make.

I really don't care enough to continue this debate.
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« Reply #109 on: July 31, 2011, 05:09:23 PM »

What languages do we all speak?  Vote for what you speak/write in passably (not necessarily fluently).  May vote for as many languages/categories as you speak.

Norwegian (so I can understand a good bit of Swedish and Danish), a tad bit of Welsh, and obviously English.  police
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« Reply #110 on: October 19, 2012, 01:34:46 PM »

I am fluent in: Swedish, Norwegian, English, Greek (in that order of fluidity)
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« Reply #111 on: October 19, 2012, 01:36:35 PM »

Danish and english. I can understand and communicate with norwegians and swedes and then I speak a little german and spanish.
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« Reply #112 on: October 19, 2012, 01:37:34 PM »

Dutch
English
French
Ancient Greek
Latin

Not in order of fluency, btw.
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« Reply #113 on: October 19, 2012, 01:40:39 PM »

French (mother tongue)
Proficient in English, Spanish, good knowledge of Portuguese.  Cheesy
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« Reply #114 on: October 19, 2012, 01:41:38 PM »

English
Pennsylvanian
.... that's it  Cry
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« Reply #115 on: October 19, 2012, 01:43:25 PM »

English and Filipino
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« Reply #116 on: October 19, 2012, 01:45:19 PM »

Dutch
English
French
Ancient Greek
Latin

Not in order of fluency, btw.

Are you fluent in ancient greek and latin or do you just know it?
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« Reply #117 on: October 19, 2012, 01:52:45 PM »

Dutch
English
French
Ancient Greek
Latin

Not in order of fluency, btw.

Are you fluent in ancient greek and latin or do you just know it?

I can read whole pages of greek and latin without dictionary the same way I could read a french newspaper. Especially in Latin, I learned it since I was 11 and have been doing it pretty extensively ever since.
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« Reply #118 on: October 19, 2012, 01:56:27 PM »

Portuguese (Mother-Tongue), English (Second Language), Spanish (Intermmediate), French (basic for speaking, intermmediate for reading). With some struggle I can understand Italian and, even less efficiently, Latin. Will learn Modern and Koine Greek at some point.
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« Reply #119 on: October 19, 2012, 01:57:23 PM »

French (mother tongue)
Proficient in English, Spanish, good knowledge of Portuguese.  Cheesy

Isso é bem incomum. Smiley Um brinde à língua de Camões! Smiley
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« Reply #120 on: October 19, 2012, 01:58:42 PM »

Pretty much just Finnish, English and passive Swedish. I've forgotten just about everything I learnt about German, Latin and Koire Greek.
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« Reply #121 on: October 19, 2012, 02:00:44 PM »

Dutch
English
French
Ancient Greek
Latin

Not in order of fluency, btw.

Are you fluent in ancient greek and latin or do you just know it?

I can read whole pages of greek and latin without dictionary the same way I could read a french newspaper. Especially in Latin, I learned it since I was 11 and have been doing it pretty extensively ever since.
Awesome Smiley
I plan to learn latin and ancient greek at the University.
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« Reply #122 on: October 19, 2012, 02:01:40 PM »

Dutch
English
French
Ancient Greek
Latin

Not in order of fluency, btw.

Are you fluent in ancient greek and latin or do you just know it?

I can read whole pages of greek and latin without dictionary the same way I could read a french newspaper. Especially in Latin, I learned it since I was 11 and have been doing it pretty extensively ever since.
Awesome Smiley
I plan to learn latin and ancient greek at the University.

If you need any help with it don't hesitate to ask me for help.
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« Reply #123 on: October 19, 2012, 02:03:59 PM »

Norwegian, English, German, Spanish, and (some) Icelandic. I can also understand/communicate with Swedes and Danes since Norwegian is mutually intelligible with Swedish and Danish.

Currently learning Cantonese.
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« Reply #124 on: October 19, 2012, 02:04:43 PM »

In order of fluency:

1. English (Primary language since I was six)
2. Malayalam (My first language, but not my most fluent)
3. French (I can read and speak fairly well, but my listening comprehension sucks)
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« Reply #125 on: October 19, 2012, 02:05:25 PM »

Why does nobody speak or learn dutch? Is outrage!
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« Reply #126 on: October 19, 2012, 02:06:15 PM »

I am fluent in: Swedish, Norwegian, English, Greek (in that order of fluidity)

I am fluent in English and can recognize when I'm being cursed at by Mexicans.
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« Reply #127 on: October 19, 2012, 02:07:19 PM »

Why does nobody speak or learn dutch? Is outrage!

Vamrat knows Afrikaans, so that is kind of like Dutch. laugh
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« Reply #128 on: October 19, 2012, 02:07:43 PM »

Why does nobody speak or learn dutch? Is outrage!

Maybe I should learn it. People on television are always talking about how danish is so similar to dutch.
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« Reply #129 on: October 19, 2012, 02:08:59 PM »

English (first language); reasonably fluent in French and Spanish; studied a bit of Italian; studied Latin and Greek long enough ago that they were scarcely ancient languages  Grin; when I was in Paraguay I learned enough Guaraní as I told my friends "to know when you're talking about me" (I did catch them a couple of times Cheesy), also while in Paraguay accustomed my ear to Brazilian Portuguese, though I've lost most of that now, but can generally make sense of what I read because of my knowledge of related languages.

Time to learn another - I hear it's good for sexagenarians to do so before we start to lose our mem
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« Reply #130 on: October 19, 2012, 02:14:41 PM »

Why does nobody speak or learn dutch? Is outrage!

It's a Calvinist language and thus there's no use for it. Even if one understood what Calvinists are talking about it would still be gibberish.
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« Reply #131 on: October 19, 2012, 02:28:58 PM »

English (fluent/first language), Punjabi (limited fluency), French (a little from school), Dari/Afghan Persian (little), Urdu-Hindi (little), also a tiny bit of Greek from school.

I also have an interest in Russian, Arabic, Pashto, Italian and Greek (I might dabble into those latter in life). 
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« Reply #132 on: October 19, 2012, 02:35:12 PM »

Serbian (the closest language to my heart) and of course Croatian, Bosnian etc. Wink
Polish (this one I'm most fluent in)
English
Spanish (bilingual section in High School)
Some Ukrainian
I understand quite well Russian, but unfortunately I don't speak it (I hope one day...)

I would love to study Arabic (I know writting and reading, some basic grammar and words) at the Warsaw University.
Now I'm learning Church Slavonic.
I used to study Hindi and German, but as for the first one, I know only how to read and write it and very basic things, as for the second one - I remember only a few sentences.
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« Reply #133 on: October 19, 2012, 02:43:42 PM »

English (first language); reasonably fluent in French and Spanish; studied a bit of Italian; studied Latin and Greek long enough ago that they were scarcely ancient languages  Grin; when I was in Paraguay I learned enough Guaraní as I told my friends "to know when you're talking about me" (I did catch them a couple of times Cheesy), also while in Paraguay accustomed my ear to Brazilian Portuguese, though I've lost most of that now, but can generally make sense of what I read because of my knowledge of related languages.

Time to learn another - I hear it's good for sexagenarians to do so before we start to lose our mem

Two in the same day who can understand Portuguese? It seems the language is gaining quite a following recently. Smiley
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« Reply #134 on: October 19, 2012, 02:51:21 PM »

Dutch
English
French
Ancient Greek
Latin

Not in order of fluency, btw.

Are you fluent in ancient greek and latin or do you just know it?

I can read whole pages of greek and latin without dictionary the same way I could read a french newspaper. Especially in Latin, I learned it since I was 11 and have been doing it pretty extensively ever since.
Awesome Smiley
I plan to learn latin and ancient greek at the University.

If you need any help with it don't hesitate to ask me for help.
Thanks  Smiley
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-St Silouan the athonite
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