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Author Topic: Fight the Man!  (Read 4569 times) Average Rating: 0
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TomS
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« on: February 02, 2007, 07:01:05 PM »

Girl, 4, kept out of school for pink hair

Web Posted: 02/02/2007 01:21 AM CST

Drew Rosegen
KENS 5 Eyewitness News

A 4-year-old Uvalde girl was banned from her pre-school because of her hair color.

Natalyn Gracia loves her pink hair and so does her dad, Ricardo, but the Dalton Early Childhood Center calls her extreme and she's missed the last four days of school because of it.

Ricardo had her hair dyed for a school parade back in October. But, he said, he never got the warning letter that came two weeks later.

If he had, he would not have had her hair re-pinked over the Christmas break.

A spokeswoman for the school said they are working with Ricardo to make sure the girl is under compliance with the schools rules, which means she has to lose the pink hair.

"I think it's being too harsh, too abusive," Richard said.

And now out of school, Natalyn, is just practicing her Spanish and her English and counting to 10 in Latin. She's also counting the days until she returns to school.

The school should let her back in and then figure out what is too extreme, Ricardo said, but for the moment neither side is budging.
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2007, 07:10:52 PM »

I guess I'm the "man."  Shocked
I think it is pretty usual for the school rules to say that you have to have natural colored hair.
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2007, 07:35:46 PM »

Utterly absurd rules, he should yank her out of that place and enroll her in another preschool...do you really want people like that taking care of your children?
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« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2007, 08:21:37 PM »

Homeschooling rules - if the parents are literate.
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« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2007, 08:36:51 PM »

Homeschooling rules - if the parents are literate.

That's a big if.
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« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2007, 08:51:40 PM »

Utterly absurd rules, he should yank her out of that place and enroll her in another preschool...do you really want people like that taking care of your children?

Ditto.  The girl is 4 years old - doesn't really have any choice in what color hair her father wants it to be.
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« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2007, 09:09:09 PM »

doesn't really have any choice in what color hair her father wants it to be.
Then perhaps daddy should be trying to vicariously live his life through his 4 year old. I'd have him up for child abuse.
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« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2007, 09:20:51 PM »

Then perhaps daddy should be trying to vicariously live his life through his 4 year old. I'd have him up for child abuse.

For dying her hair? Good luck with that one. Plus, the article says the girl liked it. Ultimately the colour of her hair is irrelevant...but that someone would deny a person education because someone else dyed their hair is sickening.
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« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2007, 09:28:55 PM »

the article says the girl liked it.
4 year olds like ice cream- should they brush their teeth with it?
This expulsion is a valuable lesson in socialization for this child which obviously her father is incapable of giving her.
Kudos to the preschool.
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« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2007, 10:24:39 PM »

 What is the big deal?  Are they afraid that all the other little girls will color their hair pink?  Who cares?!  Let the little girl go to school.  I am sure all the other children don't care....it's just the small minded school officials who are scared of a little "individuality". 
Ridiculous.

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« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2007, 11:05:39 PM »

4 year olds like ice cream- should they brush their teeth with it?
This expulsion is a valuable lesson in socialization for this child which obviously her father is incapable of giving her.
Kudos to the preschool.

Most interesting perspective comming from a guy with a tattoo and two piercings according to a recent post on another thread. Wink And while I have no intentions of following suit, I fail to see any problem in this child dying her hair. Isn't four a bit young to be indoctrinating people with fascist ideals of social conformity? The only lesson to be learned here relates to the value of individualism and the virtue in resisting 'the Man' as TomS so elegantly put it.
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« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2007, 12:07:02 AM »

Isn't four a bit young to be indoctrinating people with fascist ideals of social conformity?
Never! They should all be in uniform (preferably a dull grey) like I was when I went to school. One should not be permitted to express individuality until age 40 (when I got my tattoo).
Seriously though, my own experience was that there was no class consciousness when I went to school, (even public schools in Australia require uniforms). It wasn't until I went to University that I had my first experiences of class consciousness in Australia. Individuality is fine, but unless it comes from a solid base of social cohesion, it doesn't hold society together. Until the "glue" of society is formed (in the early years), individualism is simply the opposite of society.
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« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2007, 12:38:23 AM »

Yes, fight the man!

I find the Church's "dress code" objectionable!!  And thanks to Ozgeorge's courageous example, I'm off to get a tattoo. Something very Celtic!

 Grin
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« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2007, 12:56:04 AM »

Yes, fight the man!

I find the Church's "dress code" objectionable!!  And thanks to Ozgeorge's courageous example, I'm off to get a tattoo. Something very Celtic!

 Grin

Warning - When I Am an Old Woman I Shall Wear Purple

By Jenny Joseph


When I am an old woman, I shall wear purple
with a red hat that doesn't go, and doesn't suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
and satin sandals, and say we've no money for butter.

I shall sit down on the pavement when I am tired
and gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
and run my stick along the public railings
and make up for the sobriety of my youth.

I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
and pick the flowers in other people's gardens
and learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
and eat three pounds of sausages at a go
or only bread and pickles for a week
and hoard pens and pencils and beer nuts and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
and pay our rent and not swear in the street
and set a good example for the children.

We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practice a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
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« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2007, 01:01:45 AM »

Ozgeorge!! LOL
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« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2007, 05:58:12 AM »

Another reason to homeschool, though this one falls on the lower end of the scale.

PS. George, I take it back, you did deserve it, and a lot more.
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« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2007, 08:12:50 AM »

re. homeschooling being good if the parents are literate.

That's a big if.

While obviously the quality of the educator is very important, I don't think most interested parents can possibly do any worse than the public system.  I also think that the interest and devotion of the parent can make up for imperfections in their own educational background, by giving them the drive to educate themselves for their child's sake.  I've seen this happen quite a few times with homeschooling families I've known.
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« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2007, 10:24:09 AM »

Never! They should all be in uniform (preferably a dull grey) like I was when I went to school. One should not be permitted to express individuality until age 40 (when I got my tattoo).

LOL...I fear I shall probably never be so adventurous, though I generally manage to find my own ways to shock. Generally staying within the rules expectations of society, but only just, and at the same time turning those rules and expectations on their head...in doing so I have made more than one instructor passionately hate me. But my style takes effort, something I would not expect a 4 year old to be able to do...something I would not suspect the vast majority of the population to be able to do...so let them dye their hair pierce their ears or do whatever else they feel necessary to express their individuality. Wink

Quote
Seriously though, my own experience was that there was no class consciousness when I went to school, (even public schools in Australia require uniforms). It wasn't until I went to University that I had my first experiences of class consciousness in Australia.

If one is displayed about not displaying social class, the colour of one's hair should hardly be the primary concern. Great wealth and social prestige is not required to dye one's hair pink. Furthermore, I would suspect that had this child came to school with actual signs of wealth such as ridiculously expensive designer clothes, no comment would have been made, other than perhaps a complement about the clothing. No, the only reasoning going on here is non-conformity=bad.

Quote
Individuality is fine, but unless it comes from a solid base of social cohesion, it doesn't hold society together. Until the "glue" of society is formed (in the early years), individualism is simply the opposite of society.

Here I disagree, though perhaps that's a result of my being born and raised in the American west. In my experience individuality IS the 'glue' that holds society together. A respect of the rights and independence of the individual (as well as the knowledge that a violation of these rights would, more likely than not, get you shot) is the social and cultural basis for American society...especially in the west. Thus, to attack individualism is to attack the very fabric of our society, it is an attempt to undermine our cultural and social structure...which is actually far more egalitarian than other societies where the poor are forced to depend on the rich, for while there may be difference in class there is far less dependency than in traditional societies, and that rule about meddling in my business will get you shot is applied across the board.
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« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2007, 10:27:42 AM »

While obviously the quality of the educator is very important, I don't think most interested parents can possibly do any worse than the public system.  I also think that the interest and devotion of the parent can make up for imperfections in their own educational background, by giving them the drive to educate themselves for their child's sake.  I've seen this happen quite a few times with homeschooling families I've known.

While the dedication of a parent might be able to make up for the lack of experience in education, it's unlikely to make up for a lack of knowledge, especially in math, sciences, and languages. The sixth grade is about the highest grade in which 95%+ of parents should be allowed to homeschool their children. (I'm sure there are a few people out there who would be capable of giving their children a quality highschool education, but while I have known several people who homeschool or were homeschooled, I have yet to meet one).
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« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2007, 01:12:27 PM »

Yet another uninformed opinion Greek.  If most parents are only capable of sixth grade math/science, they probably shouldn't have had children anyway!

One does not need the socialist agenda in a classroom simply because they have hit a certain chronological marker.  If a parent is NOT comfortable teaching calculus or chemistry, there are far better options than handing their offspring to the wonderful US government.  The track record for US highschools is far worse than that of homeschooling parents.  there is no way around that fact.

As far as this little girl is concerned, if you are going to place your child in an institution then you have to follow that institution's rules.  Like it or not, that's what you get when you place your child into someones  hands.  Pink hair shouldn't matter this much, although it might be a mild distraction at first.   But, it's their school and her parents chose to utilize it.

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« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2007, 02:20:59 PM »

Yet another uninformed opinion Greek.  If most parents are only capable of sixth grade math/science, they probably shouldn't have had children anyway!

Well, by the seventh grade you should be teaching your child Algebra...and in my experience the overwhelming of Americans, be they parents or not, do not have a good grasp of this most basic mathematics; certainly the overwhelming majority lack the understanding necessary to effectively teach the subject. As for Calculus, Physics, Chemistry, and Foreign Languages...well most people have enough trouble balancing their cheque book, keeping the right chemical levels in their pool, and communicating in English. I would say that my concerns are well founded. I believe the English homeschooling requirements, as I understand them at least, would probably be appropriately, a college degree and A-levels in the subjects you are teaching are required if one is to homeschool.

Quote
One does not need the socialist agenda in a classroom simply because they have hit a certain chronological marker.  If a parent is NOT comfortable teaching calculus or chemistry, there are far better options than handing their offspring to the wonderful US government.

Wow, and I thought I was politically on the fringe. However, if you teach your children to think for themselves and question authority they they should be able to objectively evaluate this 'socialist agenda' and make their own decision on the matters at hand; sheltering children from the realities of the world and the various ideologies of the world is hardly benificial.

Furthermore from my observations a child would generally be better off being exposed to the 'socialist agenda in a classroom' than the religious fanaticism found in many families engaged in homeschooling (this is at least the case where I'm from, I can't say with certainty for the rest of the country).

Quote
The track record for US highschools is far worse than that of homeschooling parents.  there is no way around that fact.

Only because most students waste their high school years taking the bare minimum and are not given the proper encouragement to pursue academic goals. The possibilities tend to be far greater at a public highschool, they are simply not generally exploites. More often than not, a Parent would do more good by sending their child to a public highschool and encouraging academic excellence and assisting them at home, rather than homeschooling them through high school

Quote
As far as this little girl is concerned, if you are going to place your child in an institution then you have to follow that institution's rules.  Like it or not, that's what you get when you place your child into someones  hands.  Pink hair shouldn't matter this much, although it might be a mild distraction at first.   But, it's their school and her parents chose to utilize it.

So, as I suggested, find another institution.
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« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2007, 04:54:04 PM »

i fink homeskooling da kidz is a good idia. i homeskool mi kidz and i am litarit….literit. i can reed and rite… english gramma and speling is mi best subjects. mi maffs is good two

ich sprikt doytch zer goot

so yu can sea mi kidz are wel edjucated
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« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2007, 05:30:42 PM »

Riddikulas,

Actually, your last post shows that maybe you really are capable of participating in this Other Language thread...

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,11004.0.html

See, you sold yourself too short, but really you can learn this other language... Wink
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« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2007, 05:36:25 PM »

Yet another uninformed opinion Greek.  If most parents are only capable of sixth grade math/science, they probably shouldn't have had children anyway!

Are yu sujjesting dummies shuldnt breed? I resemble that remark!  Its owt and owt prejadis! Grin
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« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2007, 05:40:49 PM »

Riddikulas,

Actually, your last post shows that maybe you really are capable of participating in this Other Language thread...

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,11004.0.html

See, you sold yourself too short, but really you can learn this other language... Wink

Hey FrChris,

I fink yu mite be rite!! Im agonna join y'all in da Redneckian chat! Deres alwys summit nu ta larhn, aint dere. (Lord have mercy!)  Grin
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« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2007, 12:02:12 AM »

Hayek calls the socialist agenda fascist ideals of social conformity
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« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2007, 02:59:03 AM »

PS. George, I take it back, you did deserve it, and a lot more.
LOL Cheesy
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« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2007, 06:29:02 AM »

Are yu sujjesting dummies shuldnt breed? I resemble that remark!  Its owt and owt prejadis! Grin

The total irresponsibility of Parents to home school their children is ill-advisable. A total lack of identity and promise for a child to be with their peers in an engaging society shows that they couldn't possibly cope with the outside world. This seems to be for the parents a dismissing of the fact that Private schools that offer a wide variety of Vocational Subjects (arts, sciences, English literature, language, teen financial responsibilities, etc).

Now the questions needs to be asked: Which makes a child more mature, to get an education based on ethics and Reform for Modern society or the religious/urban mentality to share a dependence only on the Village (Towns) that do not reflect on higher standards? If anything their completely missing the big picture when they believe that this will undermine the Public Education?
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« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2007, 02:47:01 PM »

If anything their completely missing the big picture when they believe that this will undermine the Public Education?

Looks like my children's grammar is going to be sadly lacking. I would have made the ghastly mistake of correcting the above sentense and insisting on "they're" instead of "their". And as for that interrogation point; I would have considered it decidely dodgy.  Oh well.... back to the drawing board. Wink
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« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2007, 06:33:48 PM »

Arrest the father and send him to sensitivity training.  Perhaps Matel will sue on behalf of Barbie. 



 I remember the debate about deschooling society - in the current system you get conformist idiots and the rare genius who does not follow the rules.  i also remember proposing a book about a subject I had invented and being asked by the editor of a famous publisher whether I had a degree in this subject! I couldn't get into the head of this idiotic editor that I was pioneering the idea.  Well she didn't get it.  And in retrospect I glad she didn't.
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« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2007, 12:48:01 AM »

Take 2.  Sorry!

The total irresponsibility of Parents to home school their children is ill-advisable. A total lack of identity and promise for a child to be with their peers in an engaging society shows that they couldn't possibly cope with the outside world.

Come now.  I'd hardly call what goes on in a tyical school environment outside of the classroom "engaging".  If anything, it is an exercise in mind-numbing conversation about who has the better clothes or gaming system and such.  If my child (and I don't have one, for the record) is spared that droll, so much the better. 

This seems to be for the parents a dismissing of the fact that Private schools that offer a wide variety of Vocational Subjects (arts, sciences, English literature, language, teen financial responsibilities, etc).
This is true, but when you consider that the average family in the United States only has a disposable income of less than $7,000, after most bills and taxes are paid, it is highly unlikely that their children can attend private schools.  The average cost of tuition at private schools, whether pariochial or not, is roughly $15,000.  The opportunity, simply, does NOT exist for too many people and that needs to be rectified. 

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« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2007, 01:32:52 AM »

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Come now.  I'd hardly call what goes on in a tyical school environment outside of the classroom "engaging".  If anything, it is an exercise in mind-numbing conversation about who has the better clothes or gaming system and such.  If my child (and I don't have one, for the record) is spared that droll, so much the better.

Yet, this can also be seen in many private schools.  As much as people do not want to admit it, the true education is usually dependent not on the school type of teacher, but the student and parent. 
That said, many teachers are not for the current system.  If you want change, get involved in the local school board and write your state Representatives. 

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The total irresponsibility of Parents to home school their children is ill-advisable. A total lack of identity and promise for a child to be with their peers in an engaging society shows that they couldn't possibly cope with the outside world. This seems to be for the parents a dismissing of the fact that Private schools that offer a wide variety of Vocational Subjects (arts, sciences, English literature, language, teen financial responsibilities, etc).

Now on the other hand, I wouldn't call homeschooling irresponsible.  I'd be tempted to supplement my children's education with homeschooling (God willing that I have a family one day), even as a Public school teacher.  I cannot afford a private school education (at least one of quality) and I do believe that the public schools do not put enough emphasis on classical studies.  Again, write your state representative.  We're bound by the state.  That said, I find the homeschooling movement very interesting, mainly as it has emerged as a backlash either against these silly standarized tests that are paraded everywhere and the curriculum they demand (IOW, less challenging classes in schools) or for a religious agenda.  Not that either are bad, but I think we all can take a lesson or two from standardized.

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And in retrospect I glad she didn't.
 
You mean I AM glad she did not. Wink


Finally, I think we need to realize that different schoolings are better for different student.  I would never dream of submitting my sister to a high level classical education of the arts that I am in (although, I think she should be exposed to it) just as I would never dream of myself going to dance school (although, it may help my dating life).  For some students, homeschooling is better and others it is not.  IMHO, that is the major problem of ALL schools now a days.  They are not flexible enough to assist individual children.  I do think within my lifetime, education will switch to a system of that sort, but until then I think we all need to be aware that different students learn different ways and with that in mind, get the public schools to diversify even more and have more connections between teachers and students.  (These are things that I think you'll start to see too, with this next generation of educators coming in).
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« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2007, 08:47:38 AM »

I believe standardization to be a step in the right direction, certain minimum expectations need to be set, the problem is that the standards are set WAY too low. The frightening thing is that standards have been substantially lowered over the past 100 years, but the level of knowledge needed to be competent in this world has vastly increased. The requirements should be higher and more stringent than they were 100 years ago. People should have a solid grasp of history from ancient times to modern when they graduate, they should be fluent or near-fluent in at least two languages other than English, they should have an education that includes philosophy from ancient times to modern, they should have at least read the most significant classics. But they should also have a solid grasp of calculus, newtonian physics (and probably have at least been introduced to modern physics), basic chemistry, basic biology, and computer science (at the very least, familiarity with one programming langauge and basic data structures). Basically, what we now view as the level of education to be expected after your first two 'general education' years of college should be requirements for high school graduation (which increased language expectations, of course).

The advanced placement programmes can help one achieve roughly half of these expectations, provided they are fully supported by your local high school and all possible AP courses are pursued, but these tests are hardly used as standards for high school graduation. However, they do could us an established starting point to standardize and then expand the curriculum.
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« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2007, 05:30:53 PM »

Ahh, but then you would have to assume that each and every child was built exactly the same with the same gifts or strengths in the exact same areas.  Think about the aforementioned student at an arts/dance school and you probably won't be in the same arena as the child in the "governer's school" doing calculus at 11.  Not a one of us is exactly identical, nor were we meant to be.
While I agree that the standards should be raised instead of lowered, that still doesn't address the children that cannot meet those standards no matter where they are schooled. My daughter with Rett has "standards" of trying to use her left hand and kick a ball, and then I also have an 10 year old in 5th grade doing pre algebra. (when I kick his butt to make him finish it, he hates repetition)  Neither his public school or the private schools in the area allow for that type of all over the board skill set.   They neither have the staff or the ability to cater to the specific child, so they cater to the slowest child in the classroom instead.
Until schools tend to the unique needs of each and every child instead of the mass of herded humans, there has to be other options.
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« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2007, 05:43:37 PM »

I believe standardization to be a step in the right direction, certain minimum expectations need to be set, the problem is that the standards are set WAY too low.

GiC,

You're absolutely correct that the standards are TOO low.  But is standardization really the answer to how we get our kids to learn things and appreciate them?

Who sets the standards?  The feds?  The states?  The local board?  Is there then one standardized test to be used rather than allowing individual teachers to make judgments?  Does a standardized test really prove anything beyond the ability to regurgitate?

As a teacher, I can say that the biggest problem I have with our school district is the compulsion to make all teachers conform to the same objectives, modes of testing, modes of presentation, etc..  Fortunately, I am the sole Latin and Greek teacher so I set the standards, which are ridiculously high! Cheesy But with so many of my colleagues, they are forced to a conformity which, in reality, forces them to teach to individual tests.  This is especially true of my colleagues in the history department (If you can really call it that).  As a result, teachers cannot make any judgments nor can they really emphasize what they are really good at and enjoy.  So much individulity is being sucked out of this profession, is it a wonder why so many teachers leave the profession within five years?  I grant that there are teachers who are absolute idiots (I know plenty; myself being exhibit A), but why force them to remain mediocre?  Principals now have become micromanagers and many of us that we have as much initiative as the kids making fries at McDonalds!
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« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2007, 05:44:14 PM »

calligraphqueen,

I am suggesting general education requirements, they should not be specific to any one subject but rather should be a level of knowledge everyone sould have in every subject. Though you brought up a good subject that should be in the standard curriculum for everyone that I forgot to mention, there should be requirements in Art History and Music Theory and/or Performance.

Of course, people should be encouraged to study their prefered fields above and beyond these general education requirements, but these should be a bare minimum for everyone to meet. For example, just because someone wishes to be an Engineer today doesn't mean that they dont have to take US history or basic courses in Literature, there are certain things that everyone needs to know to be considered educated.

As for special needs children, there should certainly be programmes to help them grow as much as possible, but these programmes should hardly dictate the standards for the education system. A diploma or a degree means you have accomplished a certain level of education and knowledge, all I'm suggesting is that we make that level meaningful.
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« Reply #36 on: February 05, 2007, 05:56:43 PM »

GiC,

You're absolutely correct that the standards are TOO low.  But is standardization really the answer to how we get our kids to learn things and appreciate them?

Who sets the standards?  The feds?  The states?  The local board?  Is there then one standardized test to be used rather than allowing individual teachers to make judgments?  Does a standardized test really prove anything beyond the ability to regurgitate?

I think we can learn quite a bit from the British educational system, though I prefer American's broader general education requirements. College is for specialization, high school should be to gain a general education. As far as a structure, while a certain percentage of a test should be multiple choice to test basic knowledge that a student should have another significant portion, perhaps the majoirty of the test, should be more open ended in an essay format where writing skills and the ability to connect ideas can be evaluated. Initial evaluation of the exams should be done by the local school with the state taking a representative sample from each school district and evaluating it to ensure consistency and uniformity. And perhaps the federal government could even take representative samples from those exams to ensure nation wide consistancy and uniformity.

The british already do something similar with their A (and O) level exams, and we already have a similar testing system set up with our advanced placements tests. Yes, the standard exams need to be improved from what we currently have, but standardization is hardly impossible.

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As a teacher, I can say that the biggest problem I have with our school district is the compulsion to make all teachers conform to the same objectives, modes of testing, modes of presentation, etc..  Fortunately, I am the sole Latin and Greek teacher so I set the standards, which are ridiculously high! Cheesy But with so many of my colleagues, they are forced to a conformity which, in reality, forces them to teach to individual tests.  This is especially true of my colleagues in the history department (If you can really call it that).  As a result, teachers cannot make any judgments nor can they really emphasize what they are really good at and enjoy.  So much individulity is being sucked out of this profession, is it a wonder why so many teachers leave the profession within five years?  I grant that there are teachers who are absolute idiots (I know plenty; myself being exhibit A), but why force them to remain mediocre?  Principals now have become micromanagers and many of us that we have as much initiative as the kids making fries at McDonalds!

While certain things certainly need to be taught by the teachers, and known by the students, allowing more open ended standard tests based on such things as essays rather than multiple choice allows for a degree of individuality in the class room, allows the teachers to spend extra time on favourite topics giving insights and making connections that may not be typical in a the given class, this would actually give the students an advantage when they have to do such work themselves with the more open ended questions on standard tests.
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« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2007, 07:15:34 PM »

Hmm...this thread made me think of an article I read in the WSJ the other day about how we send too many people to college, many of whom shouldn't be there.  The premise was that we send people for higher education when the raw material to use just isn't there.  As a result, we produce a lot of semi-educated middle management drones but fewer and fewer skilled workers in the trades (it also pointed out a good plumber or mechanic can earn wages comparable to or better than many white collar workers).  Not saying I agree or disagree, just throwing that out there.
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« Reply #38 on: February 05, 2007, 08:46:22 PM »

Now on the other hand, I wouldn't call homeschooling irresponsible.  I'd be tempted to supplement my children's education with homeschooling

While our children go to public schools, we have always been telling them about history or math or art or science or other subjects at home (often at the dinner table) and made sure that there are books and games and art supplies and good videos and such like.  I'd never thought of that as "home schooling" per se, but just doing what my parents had done when I was growing up.

It's a good thing that our youngest, who has mild Down Syndrome, goes to the school program that he does and gets Speech Therapy and Occupational Therapy there too, since we can work with him, but neither of us is a qualified therapist.  He got Physical Therapy for years too, but doesn't need it individually any more and is, in fact, mainstreamed in the Phys. Ed Class.

Ebor
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« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2007, 08:15:09 PM »

A great many people believe that they will barely tolerate homeschooling, but only for the typically developing.  We were harassed extensively by our daughter's neurdevelopmental pediatrician (big title, yet she couldn't manage to test for the Rett Syndrome Heather has...) to put her in the public school.

We did, and all it meant was token therapy, which for a girl with Rett is horrible.  Plus she was sick constantly.  Public schools aren't always the place for special children any more than they are always the place for the typically developing. ...how I wish my Heather was.

On the other hand, I just interviewed two LU students the other night and boy did we have some interesting conversation.  They have to take nearly 52 credit hours in some bible based courses-unless they transfer in directly from the attached k-12 school or another private k-12 with similiar courses.  Is this really the best use of college money?  That's nearly enough credit hours to be considered for an associate's degree.  Another example of wasted time, not to mention immersion into false doctrine.

Yes, standards need to be improved greatly.  I just wonder WHO should set them.  The NEA is so hostile towards hs'ers and private schools that they could not be objective, and yet they set the bar low for ps.  The standards we have to meet each year are really too low.  My kids would have to do very little to achieve those marks on our required standardized tests.  Our state makes us do this every year, and while I dont' believe it's a very accurate marker I don't mind much.  The tests are absurd.
My 3rd grader's test asked what came out of an egg as an actual question, then my 10th grader had the same question in her sample tests.  They were only testing math and L/A, so what that had to do with anything I don't know.


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