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Poll
Question: What language does your parish use
English exclusively - 16 (21.3%)
Other language exclusively - 6 (8%)
English with a few parts in another language - 26 (34.7%)
About half and half English and another language - 19 (25.3%)
Other/none of the above - 8 (10.7%)
Total Voters: 75

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Author Topic: The use of English in the Liturgy  (Read 6119 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: January 26, 2007, 10:32:07 AM »

My question is geared towards a typical Sunday liturgy.  I put what I think are probably the most likely answers, with one for scenarios other than the ones I put as options.  After voting, I would be very interested to see people's comments filling in more detail and explaining how their parish works.  I would also be interested to see which church/jurisdiction you belong to for everyone that votes.
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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2007, 10:39:16 AM »

My question is geared towards a typical Sunday liturgy.  I put what I think are probably the most likely answers, with one for scenarios other than the ones I put as options.  After voting, I would be very interested to see people's comments filling in more detail and explaining how their parish works.  I would also be interested to see which church/jurisdiction you belong to for everyone that votes.

You missed a possibility (which is what I would have needed), which is mostly another language with some English. My parish mainly uses Romanian (because the parishioners are overwhelmingly Romanian immigrants) but we also use not insignificant amounts of English. I read in English after the reading in Romanian, recite the Creed in English, say the Lord's Prayer in English and we even use the odd English chant. Sometimes we have the homily translated into English and Father says some of the prayers in English, but it still certainly doesn't add up to anything approaching 50% English. Having said that, I think our parish does very well considering that there is rarely a need for any English at all - much better than the Greek parish I used to attend.

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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2007, 11:04:07 AM »

Is this only for Orthodox to answer?
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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2007, 11:17:26 AM »

I guess I figured they would be the ones who would, but OO's, RC's and EC's feel free to chime in.  The more the merrier.
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2007, 11:33:52 AM »

In my current parish (Antiochian) the choir does 98% English. The only thing that they ever do in another language is the Holy God before the epistle and even then it is alternating between English and another Language. The priest uses 95% English. He will say anything that is repeated (like litanies or the peaces) in either Arabic, Greek or Slavonic.

This changes at Pascha when Christ is Risen tends to be sung in every language but English.

Mind you this is just for the liturgy, other services will use more Arabic or Greek depending on who is there. There are many times where the first half of Orthros is done entirely in Arabic and Greek because everyone who is there understands these languages and it is easier to chant in them.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2007, 11:57:09 AM by arimethea » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2007, 11:43:23 AM »

My ByzCath church does most of the Liturgy in English, but oftentimes we sing the Holy God in Slavonic and occasionally the Cherubic Hymn and the Lord's Prayer, also, in Slavonic.  I like the way we do it, as the parishoners of my church are all native-born Americans, but we manage to remember our roots.

On rare occasions, the deacon intones the litanies in Slavonic, which is a real treat.  But, as I wrote, it is on rare occasions. 
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2007, 12:03:46 PM »

The church I attend has 100% native English-speakers so the services are conducted in 100% English. But the parish I grew up in uses English and Arabic with some Greek sprinkled in because most of the members are from the middle east.  They use a combination of English and Arabic because most of the children of the immigrants speak English as a first language. But keep in mind many of the immigrants do not fully comprehend the Arabic used in the services because it is not the modern dialect they use for communication with one another. Both parishes are in the Antiochian Archdiocese.
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2007, 12:56:14 PM »

I'm in the OCA, and my current parish is largely of Russian/Ukrainian/Lemko background, with the oldest generation having come to America from that part of Europe, but their kids (who in turn have little ones themselves) were all/most born and raised here. We do most of the service in English, with a fair amount of Slavonic depending on Matushka's mood (she's the choir director). Things that are sometimes done in Slavonic are Holy God, Cherubic Hymn, and sometimes even the Anaphora. Father also gives a lot of the blessings in Slavonic.

There are only a small few of us in church each week that are not of Russian descent, and have never spoken or read the language, myself being the only one in the choir, so the Slavonic pieces are a challenge to say the least! (Can anyone say lip-reading?) Wink

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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2007, 01:21:32 PM »

The indult parish I regularly attend is 100% Latin save the opening and recessional hymns, which are sometimes in Latin and sometimes in English. The homily is obviously in English, and our pastor always begins his homily by repeating the Epistle and Gospel readings in English.

I sometimes go to a Novus Ordo---the majority of the ordinary parts are in Latin/Greek, including the Confiteor, Kyrie Eleison, Gloria in Excelsis, the Sanctus, the Pater Noster, and the Agnus Dei. The songs are about 60% English, 20% Spanish, and 20% Latin.

The parish I used to attend in college was about 90% English. The Greek Orthodox Divine Liturgy I sometimes visited was bilingual, with Greek as the primary language but with most parts repeated in English. Yes, it was long.
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« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2007, 02:23:48 PM »

I'm in the OCA, and my current parish is largely of Russian/Ukrainian/Lemko background, with the oldest generation having come to America from that part of Europe, but their kids (who in turn have little ones themselves) were all/most born and raised here. We do most of the service in English, with a fair amount of Slavonic depending on Matushka's mood (she's the choir director). Things that are sometimes done in Slavonic are Holy God, Cherubic Hymn, and sometimes even the Anaphora. Father also gives a lot of the blessings in Slavonic.

There are only a small few of us in church each week that are not of Russian descent, and have never spoken or read the language, myself being the only one in the choir, so the Slavonic pieces are a challenge to say the least! (Can anyone say lip-reading?) Wink

This is fairly similar to my parish (ACROD).  The original founding members were from the eastern end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and there are at least three generations in the parish going back to the original founders.  We do have a fair number of converts and people who have come from other jurisdictions however.

On a typical Sunday just about everything is in English, though sometimes the choir will do the Trisagion or other hymns in Slavonic.  Mnojaha Lita and Vichnaja Pamjat are always done in both.  On Sundays the Prostopinije is in English so people can follow along.  Greetings can be mixed.  Glory to Jesus Christ/Slava Isusu Christu are always done in both.  Otherwise Father will usually greet or bless the "old timers" in Slavonic and everybody else in English.

Feast days and special services are another matter, and the use of Slavonic definitely goes up then.
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« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2007, 02:34:31 PM »

My Parish is composed of about equal amounts of cradles and converts. We have Slovaks, Russians, Serbs, Macedonians, Germans, Irish, Greeks and English. Sunday Divine Liturgy is 100% English, as are all services, and this has been the case for the past 20 years. We have service books in every pew for Divine Liturgy and we also have Vespers/Vigil service books. For every Vespers/Vigil service, all Feast day services, all services in Advent and Lent, Pre-sancified Liturgies and Sunday Divine Liturgy services we have printed handouts of every word that varies from the standard part of each service (Tropars, Kontoks, etc.). Thus everyone attending each service can both read and sing every single word of every single service. This is a big job for our choir director, but she does an outstanding job, week in and week out, so that every parishioner can learn and benefit from every service.

Our parish is in the OCA.
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« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2007, 02:51:14 PM »

The Ethiopian Orthodox Church uses traditionally two languages Geez (Classical Ethiopic) for the liturgy and Amharic for the readings and preaching which is the national language.

Outside Ethiopia The church uses both of the above except that the Geez liturgy is reduced to part Geeze and part English and the reading are done: 1 English 1 Amharic 1 English. The Holy Gospel is read first in Amharic than second in English. Songs are sung after service in first.

We have many Churches established among English speaking nationals in various parts of the world. These church members are converts who do not have a direct origin with the Nation of Ethiopia. These churches have the liturgy mostly in English with some Geez very little to know Amharic is used. All readings are done in English and all singing is done in English. These congregations have keen since of true traditional Ethiopian Church and thus do as much classical Geez as they can as they learn it. Many local clergy travel to Ethiopia fro study. Also Ethiopia sends teachers from time to time.
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2007, 02:59:10 PM »

One Church I have attended uses Church Slavonic exclusively, except for a monthly English liturgy.  The other uses only Church Slavonic.  Both being Serbian Orthodox.
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2007, 03:00:00 PM »

Currently the choir in my church does everything except the creed in Ukrainian, and the priest does mostly (70-75%) English, but when the cantors sing, its pretty much 50-50 or 60-40 either way...
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« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2007, 03:54:11 PM »

I currently serve in a Convert parish that does everything in English with the exception of Pascha when we have  Orthodox from various ethnic traditions come to services and the choice sings Christ is Risen in several languages.  When the Bishop comes on his annual visit he will use all the languages used in the diocese when he does the ektanias.

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« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2007, 04:19:12 PM »

In our Antiochian parish at Vespers, we generally do repeated "Lord have mercy"s in four langauges--English, Greek, Arabic and Church Slavonic.  That's it for Vespers.  Depending on who is chanting at Matins, it is mainly English, though I might throw in a few doxas every now and then.  Teh Great Doxology is in English save for "Blessed art Thou, O Lord, teach me thy statutes" which is done in Greek and the Trisagion which is done in English/Arabic.  At great feasts and vigils, some of our Arab chanters will do the troparia for the day in Arabic or if an antiphon is to be repeated ad nauseam while the priest is praying, Arabic will again be used.  There are no objections to other languages being used and most of the congregation finds it quite refreshing.

However, I did cause a stir.  During the Nativity Season, after the Liturgy when people are coming forth to venerate the Cross, I chanted (Gregorian) the Latin Hymn by Coelius Sedulius, A solis ortus cardine, which was written around 550 A.D. and very Orthodox in its (original) contents.  (One of the popes messed with the text and changed a few things which definitely distorted the theology).  Being a Latin teacher and coming from a Latin background, I thought this hymn would remind us of pre-schism times when the East and West were not divided.  Some didn't take it that way and some started calling me "the Papist". 

So...Arabic, Slavonic, Greek, English=good; Latin=bad.  Cheesy

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« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2007, 04:20:46 PM »

Some didn't take it that way and some started calling me "the Papist".

Oh no, now we have two.   Grin
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« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2007, 04:53:25 PM »

On Sundays, the primary language in my parish is English.  We will do the second set of petitions in Greek (because the Dean always lets me do that part), as well as the "Sophia, Orthi" at the Small Entrance.Some parts of the Consecration as well as the petitions in between them (also, because I do those parts) might be done exclusively in Greek or both languages, depending on the Dean's or my mood. If the Gospel is short, we may repeat it in Greek, otherwise it's English only.


So...Arabic, Slavonic, Greek, English=good; Latin=bad.  Cheesy

The Scamandrian Axiom: it should be universally correct in all cases, yes?  Wink
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« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2007, 05:13:12 PM »

Generally Church Slavonic with very little English and even a bit of Romanian.  My Parish Priest is a Serb from Romania and is fluent in Serbian/Romanian/English.  There is no Romanian Orthodox Church nearby so we have about 5 Romanian families in our congregation the rest is made up of mainly Serbs (and a couple of Macedonian families).

The congregation is almost exclusively new immigrants.  My wife and I stand out in this regard and sometimes feel a bit out of place, but our Priest's pastoral abilities are so good it really doesn't matter.  He works hard to make all comfortable and welcome.  A very nice atmosphere.
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« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2007, 07:07:48 PM »

However, I did cause a stir.  During the Nativity Season, after the Liturgy when people are coming forth to venerate the Cross, I chanted (Gregorian) the Latin Hymn by Coelius Sedulius, A solis ortus cardine, which was written around 550 A.D. and very Orthodox in its (original) contents.  (One of the popes messed with the text and changed a few things which definitely distorted the theology).  Being a Latin teacher and coming from a Latin background, I thought this hymn would remind us of pre-schism times when the East and West were not divided.  Some didn't take it that way and some started calling me "the Papist". 

So...Arabic, Slavonic, Greek, English=good; Latin=bad.  Cheesy

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Our choir director (former RC, but Orthodox for >20 yrs) taught as a Christ is Risen in Latin from an Alleluia in Gregorian Tone 1.  I even gave a copy to Michael Perekrestov at the SF ROCOR cathedral.   Smiley
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« Reply #20 on: January 26, 2007, 07:48:40 PM »

On a typical Sunday just about everything is in English, though sometimes the choir will do the Trisagion or other hymns in Slavonic.  Mnojaha Lita and Vichnaja Pamjat are always done in both.  On Sundays the Prostopinije is in English so people can follow along.  Greetings can be mixed.  Glory to Jesus Christ/Slava Isusu Christu are always done in both.  Otherwise Father will usually greet or bless the "old timers" in Slavonic and everybody else in English.
Feast days and special services are another matter, and the use of Slavonic definitely goes up then.
Like Welkodox' church, my home parish does Sunday Liturgies in English with one or two Slavonic hymns.  However, we will sing the Carpatho Russian "para-liturgical" hymns (the Marian hymns, etc) in Slavonic during the veneration of the Cross.  Weekday Holy Day Liturgies (along with Pascha and Christmas) can be at least 25% Slavonic.
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« Reply #21 on: January 26, 2007, 09:05:54 PM »

Generally English with the Cherubic Hymn done in English and Slavonic, although on occasion my priest will take the Anaphora in Slavonic.  During Pascha we of course take Christ is Risen in both. 
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« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2007, 12:48:05 AM »

All English, except for stuff at Pascha in Greek and (ironically, only sometimes) in Slavonic.

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« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2007, 09:34:09 AM »

Mostly English with a few parts that are traditionally Greek or Aramaic (so much so they are integral with Liturgical English). At one of the monasteries the hieromonk celebrating often will pray or chant some in Latin, because we understand and like it. The translation of prayers into English is a process that might be 1600 years old (certainly within 1500 years.)
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« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2007, 11:44:38 PM »

My parish is in UOC-USA. About 50% of all services in each - Ukrainian and English. The reading of Epistle and Gospel in both of these languages. Sermons usually in both languages, unless visiting priests preach, and in this case that is up to them to decide. Paschal services also include some Greek. I think in a couple of occasions, baptisms were performed in Old Slavonic per parents' request. Pre-Liturgy Hours include "Lord, have mercy" in several languages. Fr. Amde Tsion, thank you for your info, it helped! Just from the standpoint of statistics, which means with respect to background of each and every parishioner, the parish includes descendants of immigrants of various waves of immigration from Ukraine (some of them were born in USA in mixed marriages), immigrants from Ukraine and Russia (some of whom are also converts) and American born converts, coming from varous backgrounds.
P.S. I am a cradle immigrant from Ukraine, who has been in this country for awhile now, and I am happy to see converts valued and respected at UOC.
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« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2007, 12:22:35 PM »

In addendum, we also sing alot of the para-liturgical hymns at the beginning of liturgy (before the deacon comes out to into the first litany) and after the final blessings in a Slavonic/English mixture.
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« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2007, 04:21:03 AM »

It depends.  Sometimes more than others.  Hymns before Liturgy are  usually done English and Slavonic.  We still have Slavonic funerals if the people request them.  Other local parishes, the priest uses English and the people use Slavonic.  It's not really that hard to learn how to pronounce Slavonic, however we use the Ukrainian pronunciation of Slavonic (Blahoslovi, Bohorodice, Mnohaya lita etc..)  In fact, I still don't know how to sing Christos Vokres in the Russian prounciation, it is different!  We also sing a number of Marian hymns in Slavonic, which are beautiful.  However the congregational singing, true congregational singing, prostopinije and the ukrainian/galician version the music was made to fit the Slavonic, so when you sing the piece in English and then Slavonic it is amazing how it flows in the Slavonic.   
Usually if the priest intones in Slavonic, we use Slavonic.  This can range from the Anaphora, to the Dostoyno jest,  to Octe Nas, to the Ize, to Litanies, to anitphons.  VEspers are in English.  Although the Sat. evening Prokeminon is usually alternates responses in Slavonic and English. 

And since we have Silent Epeclesis, if the Tebe Pojem is in English, we still sing Molimtisa... Boze nas to give the priest time to finish his prayers.
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« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2007, 11:05:55 AM »

However the congregational singing, true congregational singing, prostopinije and the ukrainian/galician version the music was made to fit the Slavonic, so when you sing the piece in English and then Slavonic it is amazing how it flows in the Slavonic.   

How true that is!  A friend of mine (a "continuing Anglican") asked me once why I sometimes chant certain prayers in Slavonic (I have no Slavic blood in my veins at all).  I told him I just really liked the melody of that particular chant.  He then asked why didn't I just put it into English and use the same melody.  So I sang both versions, and even he agreed that the Slavonic just worked better within that particular music paradigm.
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« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2007, 05:02:34 AM »

How true that is!  A friend of mine (a "continuing Anglican") asked me once why I sometimes chant certain prayers in Slavonic (I have no Slavic blood in my veins at all).  I told him I just really liked the melody of that particular chant.  He then asked why didn't I just put it into English and use the same melody.  So I sang both versions, and even he agreed that the Slavonic just worked better within that particular music paradigm.

I have the same experience with the Romanian. The one thing I would truly miss if our parish really put down roots and went mostly English would be the loss of chant, particularly the Trisagion and Cherubic hymn, in Romanian. It just isn't the same for me when I hear it in English - not even close.

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« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2007, 12:58:58 AM »

At school we use 50% English and 50% Greek all the time.  This is very strict, since both sides of the language "wars" tend to be very adament. 

In the Serbian church here its like 70 - 30 Church Slavonic/Serbian to English.  The priest will do quite a few petitions in English, but all the hymns are in Church Slavonic. 

Growing up we used 100% Church Slavonic in the Serbian church that my dad is a priest at.  Most churches are almost exclusively Church Slavonic. 
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« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2012, 12:21:06 PM »

I chose other, because St. Nicholas Cathedral(DC) has two separate liturgies on a normal Sunday; one in English, and the other in Slavonic with the Epistle and Gospel in Russian. When there is a mixed liturgy, about half the hymns are in each language, but most of the litanies are in English.
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« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2012, 01:18:18 PM »

In my OCA parish, except for Pascha (and even then, English is dominant), all services are 100% English.  While I have absolutely nothing against other languages, I feel strongly that that the lingua franca should be used exclusively.  While songs and chants in other languages can be absolutely beautiful, if you don't understand what's being said, how could you possibly benefit?  Furthermore, how could you possibly hope to gain converts? 
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« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2012, 01:19:34 PM »

"Other language exclusively"
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« Reply #33 on: April 18, 2012, 02:08:12 PM »

In my OCA parish, except for Pascha (and even then, English is dominant), all services are 100% English.  While I have absolutely nothing against other languages, I feel strongly that that the lingua franca should be used exclusively.  While songs and chants in other languages can be absolutely beautiful, if you don't understand what's being said, how could you possibly benefit?  Furthermore, how could you possibly hope to gain converts? 
yet they do.  Maybe not as many as they would, but that is a theoretical issue. The fact that they do gain converts is a reality.  Even parishes that are all in a foreign language.

My old OCA parish would alternate hymns in English and Slavonic (and occasional Greek).

A rule of thumb, the Divine Liturgy should be what the coffee hour is in, whether that is in English or not.

Recently I just saw something about an Mohawk Orthodox.  I would encourage the Mohawk to retain their language in their liturgy as the Aleuts, Yupik's etc. do, and the DL in Spanish and French (and German, if we can evangelize Lancester PA).  The languages are made for man, not man for the languages, so no need to insist on English the way Koine Greek and Slavonic is insisted on.  This is something that every parish should decide for itself.  After all, they know their people, their needs, and the needs of the community around them for evanglization for Orthodoxy.
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« Reply #34 on: April 18, 2012, 02:12:54 PM »

English 100% (unless I missed some special occasions). My current parish has a very large convert base. Even those who are cradle speak English and were born in the States (aside from a possible few).

In my OCA parish, except for Pascha (and even then, English is dominant), all services are 100% English.  While I have absolutely nothing against other languages, I feel strongly that that the lingua franca should be used exclusively.  While songs and chants in other languages can be absolutely beautiful, if you don't understand what's being said, how could you possibly benefit?  Furthermore, how could you possibly hope to gain converts? 
yet they do.  Maybe not as many as they would, but that is a theoretical issue. The fact that they do gain converts is a reality.  Even parishes that are all in a foreign language.

My old OCA parish would alternate hymns in English and Slavonic (and occasional Greek).

A rule of thumb, the Divine Liturgy should be what the coffee hour is in, whether that is in English or not.

Recently I just saw something about an Mohawk Orthodox.  I would encourage the Mohawk to retain their language in their liturgy as the Aleuts, Yupik's etc. do, and the DL in Spanish and French (and German, if we can evangelize Lancester PA).  The languages are made for man, not man for the languages, so no need to insist on English the way Koine Greek and Slavonic is insisted on.  This is something that every parish should decide for itself.  After all, they know their people, their needs, and the needs of the community around them for evanglization for Orthodoxy.

The parish where I was chrismated was a small Greek parish (Sts Raphael, Nicholas and Irene) where the liturgy was mostly in Greek. I really loved to hear the DL in Greek and I miss it a lot at my new parish. Maybe that's just the wannabe linguist in me...
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« Reply #35 on: April 18, 2012, 04:51:38 PM »

Usually no more than 50% English.  The rest is Slavonic.  If there are a bunch of first generation Slavs attending, we could go 70-30 with the majority being Slavonic.  One of our Bright Week services was about 90-10 with the 10% English being read by me.  The priest likes to read the Gospel in English, then Serbian, and lastly Slavonic.  The Epistle is always in English since that is all that I can effectively read.
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« Reply #36 on: April 18, 2012, 05:12:44 PM »

In my OCA parish, except for Pascha (and even then, English is dominant), all services are 100% English.  While I have absolutely nothing against other languages, I feel strongly that that the lingua franca should be used exclusively.  While songs and chants in other languages can be absolutely beautiful, if you don't understand what's being said, how could you possibly benefit?  Furthermore, how could you possibly hope to gain converts? 
yet they do.  Maybe not as many as they would, but that is a theoretical issue. The fact that they do gain converts is a reality.  Even parishes that are all in a foreign language.

 Interesting.  I wonder what the reasons are?  Perhaps the convert has a good report with the priest.  Perhaps it's the only church in the area.  Perhaps the spouse speaks the language and so the other ends up attending because of it.  As I said though, just to listen to the DL in Greek, Slavonic or Arabic is really beautiful.  I could probably learn to love attending such a church, but I would need to have the homily in English.   
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« Reply #37 on: April 18, 2012, 05:15:47 PM »

Interesting.  I wonder what the reasons are?

You should also take LARPing into consideration.
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« Reply #38 on: April 18, 2012, 05:23:32 PM »

and the DL in Spanish and French (and German, if we can evangelize Lancester PA). 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0CI-Qc82AA

I wonder how that would sound with a Pennsylvania German accent...
(Ok, the video is Greek Catholic, but German Orthodox sounds pretty much the same)
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« Reply #39 on: April 18, 2012, 08:37:00 PM »

In my parish, the liturgy is about 60% Greek- 40% English.
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« Reply #40 on: April 18, 2012, 08:53:12 PM »

Our parish alternates Sundays:

- On "odd-numbered" Sundays of the Month (1st & 3rd, 5th if present), the clergy sing all parts in English, with a handful repeated in Greek (e.g. words of institution).  The choir sings all hymns in English except any hymns that are repeated which are sung in both languages.

- On "even-numbered" Sundays of the Month (2nd & 4th), the clergy sing approx 3/4 of the Liturgy in English, the other quarter in Greek, with the usual handful of exclamations in both languages.  The choir sings about 60% of the hymns in Greek, and any repeated hymns are sung in both languages.

- Every Sunday, the Epistle and Gospel are said in both languages unless they are very long, and in that case they are said only in English.  The homily is only in English, as is the Creed.  The Lord's prayer is done in both languages.

So 2/4 Sundays we do about 40% Greek, and the other Sundays we do about 2% Greek.  The remainder is in English.
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« Reply #41 on: April 18, 2012, 09:36:36 PM »

Our parish alternates Sundays:

- On "odd-numbered" Sundays of the Month (1st & 3rd, 5th if present), the clergy sing all parts in English, with a handful repeated in Greek (e.g. words of institution).  The choir sings all hymns in English except any hymns that are repeated which are sung in both languages.

- On "even-numbered" Sundays of the Month (2nd & 4th), the clergy sing approx 3/4 of the Liturgy in English, the other quarter in Greek, with the usual handful of exclamations in both languages.  The choir sings about 60% of the hymns in Greek, and any repeated hymns are sung in both languages.

- Every Sunday, the Epistle and Gospel are said in both languages unless they are very long, and in that case they are said only in English.  The homily is only in English, as is the Creed.  The Lord's prayer is done in both languages.

So 2/4 Sundays we do about 40% Greek, and the other Sundays we do about 2% Greek.  The remainder is in English.

Bless Father!

 What about the Homilies?  Are they alternated as well, or are they always in a particular language?  I can see where the DL could easily be memorized in another language and so be fairly easy to follow along.  But all parishioners would need to be conversant in the language being used in order to understand the Homily. 
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« Reply #42 on: April 18, 2012, 09:37:10 PM »

Interesting.  I wonder what the reasons are?

You should also take LARPing into consideration.

LOL!  I forgot about these weirdos.  Smiley
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« Reply #43 on: April 20, 2012, 05:03:31 PM »

However, I did cause a stir.  During the Nativity Season, after the Liturgy when people are coming forth to venerate the Cross, I chanted (Gregorian) the Latin Hymn by Coelius Sedulius, A solis ortus cardine, which was written around 550 A.D. and very Orthodox in its (original) contents.  (One of the popes messed with the text and changed a few things which definitely distorted the theology).  Being a Latin teacher and coming from a Latin background, I thought this hymn would remind us of pre-schism times when the East and West were not divided.  Some didn't take it that way and some started calling me "the Papist". 

So...Arabic, Slavonic, Greek, English=good; Latin=bad.  Cheesy

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« Reply #44 on: April 21, 2012, 01:28:09 AM »

I answered 50/50, as that was the closest to the truth.  On typical Sunday's, the priests chant 95% in English, but the choir, unfortunately, is probably closer to 50% English--they simply do not know several hymns in English, "Only Begotten Son," "Holy, Holy, Holy," "We praise thee..." and "It is truly meet," are always in Greek, (when the choir sings, September thru June; and because our choir director is nuts (I love her, though), she refuses to chant "Lord have mercy," it's always "Kyrie Elieson," no matter in which language the priest chants.  (Our Choir Director claims that because the Roman Catholic Church retained "Kyrie Eleison," in the early first millennium, we should retain it too.)  The biggest problem with this mix, is that despite the priests chanting nearly all of the Liturgy in English, it comes across as being largely in Greek due to the choir's obstinance.
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