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Author Topic: Will the 21st Be the Orthodox Century?  (Read 2103 times) Average Rating: 0
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dantxny
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« on: January 05, 2007, 12:37:25 AM »

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2006/december/30.40.html

Jaroslav Pelikan, the late professor of history at Yale University, wrote of the Christian tradition on a scale that no one else attempted in the 20th century. Then after nearly a lifetime of studying the history of doctrine, Pelikan, a lifelong Lutheran, was received into the Orthodox Church, just a few years before he died last May at age 82.
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Pelikan is just one of a growing number of people who are joining the Eastern Orthodox Church. It makes me wonder if the 21st century will be the century of the Orthodox. Will there be a rebirth of the church's theological vision, if not its numerical growth? I'm not a prophet, nor do I want to evangelize evangelicals or reinvent Orthodox identity. But I would like to (a) offer a theological explanation for why I believe more and more Christians, especially evangelicals, may well be attracted to Orthodoxy in the 21st century, and (b) explain why more and more Orthodox need to become more evangelical.

I haven't merely thought about Orthodox and evangelical compatibility; for most of my life, I have lived it. I'm a Lebanese American who grew up in the Orthodox Church of Antioch and was transformed by Christ during my high school days in Wichita, Kansas, through the leading of evangelical friends. I did my doctoral studies under the late Orthodox theologian Fr. John Meyendorff. A portion of my scholarship over the past two decades has been devoted to introducing the Orthodox tradition to evangelical students and faculty in North America. I've also pioneered dialogues between Orthodox believers and evangelicals, and I have spoken on the subject at World Council of Churches meetings in Egypt and Germany.

Thus, I bring an intellectual and experiential knowledge of both communities, which is probably why I have a love/hate relationship with them. I'm not fully at peace with either one. Although I'm absolutely committed to the theological truth of the Orthodox church, I'm equally persuaded that we have not made that truth meaningful or accessible to our own parishioners or to those who peer inside our windows. And because of my Orthodoxy, I'm also committed to the evangelical faith.
The Rebirth of Orthodoxy

Scholars define the Great Tradition as the theological consensus of the first 500 to 1,000 years of Christian history (there is some disagreement on exact dates). This consensus encompasses the church's universally agreed upon creeds, councils, fathers, worship, and spirituality. Some key teachings and figures include the Nicene Creed, the Chalcedonian Definition, the works of Athanasius, the Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus, and Gregory of Nyssa), the spiritual writings of monks like Anthony of Egypt, and certain biblical commentaries and pastoral works.

During the past two decades, mainline and evangelical scholars have rediscovered the creative relevance of the Christian East, with its insistence on the authority of the first 500 years of Christian teaching and practice. One recent sign of evangelical interest is Thomas Oden's The Rebirth of Orthodoxy: Signs of New Life in Christianity (HarperSanFrancisco, 2002), in which Oden uses the lowercase o in order to embrace all Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox Christians who adhere to the first 500 years of the Great Tradition. Oden sets forth six layers of evidence to show that there is, indeed, a widespread rekindling of "the orthodox spirit" at the dawn of the 21st century. These layers include:

(1) Personal transformation stories. The lives of ordinary Christians and leading academics who have been dramatically changed by the testimony of the classic tradition, including Jaroslav Pelikan and Richard Swinburne, who became Eastern Orthodox, and Robert Wilken and Richard John Neuhaus, who joined the Catholic church.

(2) Faithful scriptural interpretation. Patristic methods of exegesis are receiving more attention now than at any time during the previous century. They are fast becoming a core concern of biblical studies, as evidenced by the growing number of ancient translations and commentaries being made widely available by publishing companies such as InterVarsity, Baker, and Eerdmans.

(3) The multicultural nature of orthodoxy. No modern multiculturalism is as deep or fertile as the ecumenical multiculturalism of antiquity. The cross-cultural richness of the early church is becoming increasingly evident today.

(4) Well-established doctrinal boundaries. After decades of uncritical permissiveness in the church, we are now witnessing a renewed energy for drawing boundaries around questions of religious truth. Thousands of the faithful are together relearning how to say no to heresy on behalf of a greater yes for the truth of classical orthodoxy.

(5) Ecumenical roots reclaimed. Confessing and renewing movements in Protestantism are changing local congregations and even entire denominations.

(6) Rise of a new ecumenism. Actually, what we're seeing is a revival of the ancient ecumenical method of theological decision-making set forth by Vincent Lerins: "We hold to that which has been believed everywhere, always, and by all." Laypeople can easily grasp this, and they are doing so.
Organically Connected

The problem with the usual Protestant approach to the Great Tradition, however, is the gaps and inconsistencies in retrieval efforts. To many, the Great Tradition is like a library, a place you go to pick out the books you find most helpful. You can discard the ones that no longer seem relevant, while choosing the ones that have proven to be of lasting value.

So what makes me think that this renewed interest in the Great Tradition may lead to more Christians joining Eastern Orthodoxy, or at least embracing its theological vision? Simply put, I think more and more people will recognize the vital relationship between the major movements and themes of Christian antiquity and the organic life of the Eastern Orthodox Church from whence these themes came.

In two areas, especially, the Orthodox church has maintained its unbroken succession with Christian antiquity, and these areas are particularly attractive to an increasing number of Christians.

Scripture. We all agree that the Spirit's witness through the Bible is the main criterion of the church's faith. Tradition simply witnesses to, safeguards, and corrects itself by the integrity of the biblical message. But it was the churches of the early centuries (both East and West) that decided, piecemeal, which texts constituted the canon of Scripture, by virtue of their apostolic origin and wide acceptance within the worshiping community. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say that the Spirit embraced the believing community through the choosing of the canon, rather than that the church chose the canon. Still, the canon was composed within the context of the believing community by members of the church. Scripture was never "external" to the believing community. This does not mean that Scripture owes its authority to the church, but that the Spirit was inseparably united to the church and its sacred texts. The church functioned as the mediating authority that bore witness to the work of God within it.

So whether they are aware of it or not, every time evangelicals pick up their Bibles, they are relying on the historic church's judgment on the colossal issue of canonicity! Without acknowledging it, evangelicals validate the authority of the Spirit-led tradition in determining canonicity. That same Spirit-led tradition has governed the Orthodox church over the centuries.

I believe an increasing number of people fascinated with the early church will see that the Spirit, the Bible, tradition, and real, historical, identifiable churches are inseparably united, then as now.

Historical continuity. I imagine that the deeper evangelicals delve into church history, the less they will confine the meaning of "orthodoxy" to the first 500 or 1,000 years. They will come to embrace the "whole story" of the faithful, not just the parts they personally like. They will discover that the fullness of Christian orthodoxy does not end with a date in the history books, but lives on in what Georges Florovsky called "the mind of the church" and what John Meyendorff described as the church's "living tradition." Evangelicals will see that the theological and institutional history of the Great Tradition is directly tied to the Great Church
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"If you give the average Frenchman a choice between a reforming president who would plug the country's huge deficit and a good cheese, he would probably opt for the cheese." - Stephen Clarke
I think the French may be on to something here.
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2007, 02:11:15 AM »

You can hear an interview of the Antiochian theologian, Bradley Nassif, on Ancient Faith Radio discussing this issue.

here is the link   http://www.ancientfaithradio.com/archives/Interviews/nassifdownload32.mp3
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2007, 04:24:35 AM »

Quote
Will the 21st Be the Orthodox Century?

Come on, is this serious? Smiley
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2007, 12:47:53 PM »

Well, I think it is worded as a question in order to challenge us make it so... Cheesy

But if you ever come to visit my little parish you might believe it. A whole family joined us yesterday. Their two teenaged children were baptized and the parents were chrismated. Another father, who is an inquirer, was taking notes during the service. He and his very large family have been attending for the last 6 months. The catechism class is full.
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FHL
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2007, 12:59:30 PM »

Every century is the Orthodox century, its just that no one notices.  Cheesy
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Tamara
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« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2007, 01:29:27 PM »

h
Every century is the Orthodox century, its just that no one notices.  Cheesy


having a sense of humor is a requirment if you are an Orthodox Christian...hee, hee, hee
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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2007, 01:37:52 PM »

Heh

but an interesting thing is I had just recently bought Jaroslav Pelikan's book "Who's Bible Is It?" and I felt that it was leaning towards an Orthodox, or at least a non-sola-scriptura position.
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2007, 01:40:31 PM »

but an interesting thing is I had just recently bought Jaroslav Pelikan's book "Who's Bible Is It?" and I felt that it was leaning towards an Orthodox, or at least a non-sola-scriptura position.

Well, yeah, since the historical record is one of the biggest reasons Mr. Pelikan (may his memory be eternal!) converted to Orthodoxy. Smiley
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2007, 02:18:08 PM »

Well, yeah, since the historical record is one of the biggest reasons Mr. Pelikan (may his memory be eternal!) converted to Orthodoxy. Smiley

I didn't know Pelikan had converted while reading it though, and I'm not sure but I think he converted after he wrote the book. I had bought the book just becuase it looked interesting but was prepared for the usual Protestant view so I was surprised to find right from the beginning a lenghty chapter on the importance of oral tradition
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2007, 02:22:56 PM »

Fwiw, Pelikan converted in 1998 and the book is from 2005. I'm glad you enjoyed it, though... it was a bit too ecumenistic for my tastes. Smiley
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« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2007, 02:24:04 PM »

Heh

but an interesting thing is I had just recently bought Jaroslav Pelikan's book "Who's Bible Is It?" and I felt that it was leaning towards an Orthodox, or at least a non-sola-scriptura position.

Well, yeah, since the historical record is one of the biggest reasons Mr. Pelikan (may his memory be eternal!) converted to Orthodoxy. Smiley

It goes to show you that different people can look at the Bible and different people can look at the historical record and come to different conclusions. Even some Protestants claim to base their choice of church on the Fathers, though it's fair to say that those who deeply study the historical record usually become Catholic or Orthodox.

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« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2007, 02:25:42 PM »

Fwiw, Pelikan converted in 1998 and the book is from 2005. I'm glad you enjoyed it, though... it was a bit too ecumenistic for my tastes. Smiley

Pelikan does seem quite ecumenical. I remember reading an article of his where he referred to the anti-ecumenists as "isolationist elements." Perhaps it's partly because of his conversion at such a late stage of his life, after a lifetime of thought, reflection, and study on the Christian tradition.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2007, 02:31:55 PM by lubeltri » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2007, 02:29:47 PM »

Ah, thanks for the info Asteriktos, puts things into percepective now.

And ya, I'm assuming lubeltri is right on why he is so ecumenical, it's hard for some us to completely let go of our past alliances. I was born Orthodox but went to Catholic schools, so I have a soft spot when it comes to the Roman church.
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"Let us love one another first, then in an atmosphere of love we can discuss theological matters." - H.H. Pope Shenouda III
Tags: Tradition  evangelicals  Pelikan  Jaroslav  21st century  conversion Antiochian ecumenism Ecumenical book 
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