Author Topic: Artificial Birth Control  (Read 41653 times)

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Offline Frobie

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #45 on: December 20, 2003, 01:21:38 AM »
I agree with Nektarios...Take back the GOA!

Offline Νεκτάριος

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #46 on: December 20, 2003, 01:34:22 AM »
Quote
I agree with Nektarios...Take back the GOA!

AMIN! AMIN! AMIN!

Offline Maria

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #47 on: December 20, 2003, 04:14:53 AM »
Yes, Pavlos, that is the current advice being given often in the GOA. Essentially a man and woman, now bound as one by the sacrament must decide with guidance what is best.
It does sound pretty "iffy" to me and not Traditional. Eventually they'll get it right, I hope.

Demetri


There is a Greek Orthodox priest who is now a great grandparent. He is very concerned about any use of natural or artificial birth control, including NFP. He told his congregation that when using NFP or the condom, one is being very selfish and is preventing God from giving his blessings. God's blessings to us are precious little ones. He said that little ones often lead their parents to Christ because parenting helps humans to learn to be unselfish in their love. This is the best argument against birth regulation that I have ever heard. The married life is a school of sanctity and we are perverting it by our contraception and unwillingness to bear children. Furthermore, we are denying the Church future priests and monks, because most priests, monks and nuns come from large families.

Hope this sheds some light.

Elizabeth-Maria
« Last Edit: December 20, 2003, 04:17:43 AM by Maria »
The memory of God should be treasured in our hearts like the precious pearl mentioned in the Holy Gospel. Our life's goal should be to nurture and contemplate God always within, and never let it depart, for this steadfastness will drive demons away from us. - Paraphrased from St. Philotheus of Sinai
Writings from the Philokalia: On Prayer of the Heart,
Translated from the Russian by E. Kadloubovksy and G.E.H. Palmer, Faber and Faber, London, Boston, 1992 printing.

Offline Keble

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #48 on: December 20, 2003, 08:18:17 AM »
There is a Greek Orthodox priest who is now a great grandparent. He is very concerned about any use of natural or artificial birth control, including NFP. He told his congregation that when using NFP or the condom, one is being very selfish and is preventing God from giving his blessings. God's blessings to us are precious little ones.

What is unselfish about potential (great-)grandparents wishing to have grandchildren?


Offline TomS

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #49 on: December 20, 2003, 09:51:24 AM »
I can't imagine you're much of a fan of monasticism in general though, after having read some of your recent posts.

Why not? My posts are always related to issues of Praxis for those living in the "real world"

I have no problem with monasticism. If you feel that is what you are called to, then that is fine with me and is none of my business. Besides,  monks SHOULD be very strict when it comes to Praxis --  that's their job!  :)

« Last Edit: December 20, 2003, 09:52:41 AM by Tom+ú »

Offline Seraphim Reeves

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #50 on: December 20, 2003, 10:17:16 AM »
Anastasios,

Quote
Technically no one allows abortofacient contraceptives like the Pill although some -- and I think this is the only way I can describe this -- morons think that it "is a-ok" even though it can cause abortions by preventing implantation!!

Actually, not all birth-control pills work the same (translation = not all simply prevent implanation...which would be the chemical equivelent to an IUD.)  Unfortunately, when dolling out pills, very few physicians care to make the distinction.

Seraphim

Offline Anastasios

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #51 on: December 20, 2003, 10:28:37 AM »
Maria,

I feel that most Orthodox do not understand the difference in approach between NFP and condoms.  However, I would agree that it is good that he is preaching against contraception in general.  I cannot elaborate more as I am running out the door to go on vacation, but I suggest you check out

www.orthodoxnfp.org

Yours in Christ,

anastasios
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Past posts reflect stages of my life before my baptism and may not be accurate expositions of Orthodox teaching. Also, I served as an Orthodox priest from 2008-2013, before resigning.

Offline TomS

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #52 on: December 20, 2003, 11:22:35 AM »
So then, is all sex that does not end in the act of coitus a sin?

Offline Seraphim Reeves

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Re:Artificial Birth Control
« Reply #53 on: December 20, 2003, 11:26:39 AM »
Tom,

Quote
Go to the GOA site and read about when Confession came into the church? Read church history about canons that were created and then later ignored.

This is the danger of all Orthodox-historical revisionism (both the "right leaning" and "left leaning" varieties.)  Rather than being something that is handed down, generation to generation, "Orthodox modernism" generally cops a quasi-Protestant attitude, and seeks to by-pass the wisdom of the immediate generation (or generations...or even entire centuries...nay, millenia, plus!) in favour of some supposedly "purer, ancient tradition."

Of course, the problem with such an attitude, is that it is very, very selective - it's cafeteria like, in what ancient practices or positions it takes, with practically no interest in the context they were lived out in.  

For example, it is true what we now call "auriculour confession" or "private confession" did not exist from the get-go.  However, rather than result in a dismissive attitude towards this, we should ask (as the "man of tradition", Chesterton, would have asked) "why was it instituted?"

Here are some reasons...

- in the earliest period of the Church, you could characterize the typical Christian with a fervor which, sadly, was not so typical after the legalization of Christianity, and the conversion of the masses...a hodge podge of varying degrees of fervor, along with the unfortunate reality of "nominal" or "cultural" Christianity.

- Also steadily transforming, was the status of the Church as a "closed society".  For example, you were no longer dealing with congregations in the tens (maximum), but very often in the hundreds (and at some cathedrals, more!).  Thus, there developed an unfortunate ability to become "anonymous".

Given these things, it became necessary to better guard access to the Chalice, for the sake of those communicating.

Thus, while many modern liturgical types are very fond of refering to the ancient practice of receiving Holy Communion every time one goes to the Divine Liturgy - which should still be the ideal, and I'm sure no one disputes this - they leave out the equally important factor of doing so with a good conscience.  This means