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91
Faith Issues / Re: Modern Church Fathers
« Last post by Asteriktos on Yesterday at 07:57:01 AM »
My argument hinges on the way in which St Maximos's understanding manifests a general intuition that is implicit throughout the Eastern Christian tradition: that it is quite wrong to speak--as Western theology so often has--of divine grace as something added as a supernatural gift to "pure nature." Rather, as Vladimir Lossky has rightly noted, this Eastern tradition knows nothing of "pure nature" since it sees grace as being "implied in the act of creation itself." Because of this, as he goes on to note, the cosmos is seen as inherently "dynamic, tending always to its final end."

The belief that things have a natural "place" or telos toward which they naturally tend to move is known as teleology, and what Lossky hints at here is the way in which, for important strands of Byzantine theology, at least some aspects of the divine providence arise from within the creation through the intrinsically teleological factors that have been, so to speak, built into its components. This is particularly clear in the work of St Maximos himself since he sees the logos that constitutes the inner reality of each created thing, not only as a manifestation of the divine Logos of which the fourth gospel speaks, but also as what Metropolitan Kallistos has described as "God's intention for that thing, its inner essence, that which makes it distinctively itself and at the same time draws it towards the divine realm."

For St Maximos--and for the strange of the Greek patristic tradition that culminates in his work--the way in which each created thing has its origin and intended final end in God is intimately linked to the constitutive presence in it of a characteristic logos which is a manifestation, in some sense, of the divine Logos itself. This presence not only gives, to each created thing, the being it has in the temporal world, but also draws it--from within, not by some external, special action--toward its ultimate fulfillment in Christ.

-- Fr. Christopher Knight, Source
92
Faith Issues / Re: Pre-Modern Church Fathers (8th to 18th Centuries)
« Last post by Asteriktos on Yesterday at 07:28:21 AM »
"Those who walk according to the flesh, think the things of the flesh; those who walk according to the spirit, the things of the spirit; for the thought of the flesh is death; but the thought of the spirit, life and peace. And so the thought of the flesh is hostile to God, for it is not subject to the law of God. Indeed it cannot be. Those who are in the flesh cannot please God" (Rom. 8:5-8). In brief this is the power of the mystery, and this is why we should celebrate spiritually and behave spiritually, with holiness and justice, with love, with gentleness, with peace, "with forbearance, with goodness, with the Holy Spirit" (2 Cor. 6:6), so that as far as we ourselves are concerned we do not render the dispensation of our Lord Jesus Christ empty and ineffectual.

-- St. Theodore the Studite (d. 826), Source
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Faith Issues / Re: Early Church Fathers
« Last post by Asteriktos on Yesterday at 07:14:07 AM »
Gladly, then, let us announce His salvation, this day born of the Eternal Day, let us declare 'his glory among the Gentiles: his wonders among all people.' (Ps. 96:3) He lies in a manger but He holds the world in His hand; he is nourished at the breast but He feeds the angels; He is wrapped in swaddling clothes but He clothes us with immortality; He is suckled but is adored; He does not find room in the inn but He makes a temple for Himself in the hearts of believers. For strength took on weakness that weakness might become strong. Therefore, let us marvel at rather than despise His human birth; from it let us learn the lowliness which such loftiness assumed for our sake. Then let us enkindle our love so that we may come to His eternal day.

-- St. Augustine (d. 430), Source
94
Other Topics / Re: Video of the Day
« Last post by Dominika on Yesterday at 06:21:40 AM »
For last night the the relics of st. Nektarios of Egina (His Hand) came from Greece to my parish - today they're leaving for Greece, earlier they had visited Warsaw metropolitan cathedral and some places in Podlasie region. The biggest Polish Orthodox website, cerkiew.pl, organised a live broadcast from the Akathist in Church Slavonic and Polish and from midnight Liturgy (well, it's some piece, not all) at my parish.

Akathist

Liturgy

On the video from Akathist you can notice me on the right side, in the background.
95
Convert Issues / Re: Annoyed with Inconsistency of Orthodoxy?
« Last post by youssef on Yesterday at 05:35:44 AM »
Some of the inconsistency just come from the anti catholics way of thinking.

Mary was prepurified for many orthodox church father but when the catholics consider it a doctrine it become a heresy
96
Have you read Ibas' Letter?

Are you aware that he was busy translating the works of Theodore of Mopsuestia into Syriac and distributing them?

He was a determined Theodorean. He never rejected Theodore. He was never asked to. He was more than willing to cut Nestorius adrift.

97
For anyone who needs some basic info about the Macedonian schism, there is a very good documentary made by Daniel Sysoev.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4icrY35J8qk
98
Reviews / Re: What is everyone reading?
« Last post by Asteriktos on Yesterday at 04:04:38 AM »
Justin, what are some good texts to start reading Berdayev?

I'm afraid I haven't read nearly enough of him to answer that. There're a couple good sites that provide excerpts, quotes, articles and bibliographies though (such as here and here), and I'd think those would be better at giving some indication of where to start with him, based on what you're looking for. Perhaps there is a 'must read' or 'start here' text with him, but if there is I haven't yet read it or heard it described as such. 
99
Religious Topics / Re: Trailers from Christian movies
« Last post by Volnutt on Yesterday at 01:14:06 AM »
Francis Schaeffer has a nice directing and filmographic style in his documentary "The Early Church", showing ancient Christian and Roman ruins. But the teachings in the documentary have a major dose of how Schaeffar would like to imagine early Christianity as a Reformed Protestant. For example, Schaeffer shows a man in Roman garb reading a scroll, while he narrates in an academic tone:

"In the early church, the authority rested on the Bible alone, but in the Middle Ages there had come a change, with authority divided between the Bible and the Church."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=287midjlhl8


Shouldn't someone who has studied the early Church realize that the Bible hadn't even been completed until the end of the 1st century or so? Shouldn't he realize that in 44-200 AD, the Church's bishops and the Traditions would also have authority over the Church?

As far as these kinds of discussions go, one of my favorite passages is from Eusebius, who records something written by St. Melito of Sardis (d. 180):

"Melito, to his brother Onesimus, greeting! Since you have often, in your zeal for the Word, expressed a wish to have extracts made from the Law and the Prophets concerning the Saviour, and concerning our entire Faith, and have also desired to have an accurate statement of the ancient books, as regards their number and their order, I have endeavored to perform the task, knowing your zeal for the faith, and your desire to gain information in regard to the Word, and knowing that you, in your yearning after God, esteem these things above all else, struggling to attain eternal salvation. Accordingly when I went to the East and reached the place where these things were preached and done, I learned accurately the books of the Old Testament, and I send them to you as written below" (Ecclesiastical History, 4.26.13-14)

It reminds me of the humility of St. Paul as recorded in Galatians: even though they'd been going about things for years in a certain way, nonetheless they were still open to correction if they found out they were mistaken:

"Then after fourteen years, I went up again to Jerusalem, this time with Barnabas. I took Titus along also. I went in response to a revelation and, meeting privately with those esteemed as leaders, I presented to them the gospel that I preach among the Gentiles. I wanted to be sure I was not running and had not been running my race in vain." (Gal. 2:1-2)

Add to that St. Basil's discussion of authoritative unwritten traditions, yeah.
100
Religious Topics / Re: Trailers from Christian movies
« Last post by Asteriktos on Yesterday at 01:07:41 AM »
Francis Schaeffer has a nice directing and filmographic style in his documentary "The Early Church", showing ancient Christian and Roman ruins. But the teachings in the documentary have a major dose of how Schaeffar would like to imagine early Christianity as a Reformed Protestant. For example, Schaeffer shows a man in Roman garb reading a scroll, while he narrates in an academic tone:

"In the early church, the authority rested on the Bible alone, but in the Middle Ages there had come a change, with authority divided between the Bible and the Church."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=287midjlhl8


Shouldn't someone who has studied the early Church realize that the Bible hadn't even been completed until the end of the 1st century or so? Shouldn't he realize that in 44-200 AD, the Church's bishops and the Traditions would also have authority over the Church?

As far as these kinds of discussions go, one of my favorite passages is from Eusebius, who records something written by St. Melito of Sardis (d. 180):

"Melito, to his brother Onesimus, greeting! Since you have often, in your zeal for the Word, expressed a wish to have extracts made from the Law and the Prophets concerning the Saviour, and concerning our entire Faith, and have also desired to have an accurate statement of the ancient books, as regards their number and their order, I have endeavored to perform the task, knowing your zeal for the faith, and your desire to gain information in regard to the Word, and knowing that you, in your yearning after God, esteem these things above all else, struggling to attain eternal salvation. Accordingly when I went to the East and reached the place where these things were preached and done, I learned accurately the books of the Old Testament, and I send them to you as written below" (Ecclesiastical History, 4.26.13-14)

It reminds me of the humility of St. Paul as recorded in Galatians: even though they'd been going about things for years in a certain way, nonetheless they were still open to correction if they found out they were mistaken:

"Then after fourteen years, I went up again to Jerusalem, this time with Barnabas. I took Titus along also. I went in response to a revelation and, meeting privately with those esteemed as leaders, I presented to them the gospel that I preach among the Gentiles. I wanted to be sure I was not running and had not been running my race in vain." (Gal. 2:1-2)
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