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 91 
 on: Today at 01:27:13 AM 
Started by charbelkaleab - Last post by Sam G
and did she live her life in accordance with it's teachings?


It's entirely possible she lived her life in more accord with Christ's teachings than any of us.  Wink

.... but the fact remains that she was never part of the Orthodox Church, therefore she cannot be venerated as an Orthodox saint.


No one is talking about the Church venerating her as a saint.

Are not our homes and prayer corners supposed to be a "little church"?


There are lots of people venerated at home that are not canonized by the Church. How are saints canonized if not by popular veneration?


unfortunately using -that- logic in this case.....is not useful.

Popular veneration of an Orthodox holy person can lead to them being recognized as a Saint, but you can't apply that to a Catholic person or a Protestant person.

i.e. Just because I decide to venerate Calvin, doesn't make him suitable for later Sainthood.




Another ridiculous example. Arius = Calvin = St Therese is silly. We are rational creatures. We can look at a person's life and make a rational judgement that they led a holy life. Everything outside of Orthodoxy is not evil.  Wink

Everything outside of Orthodoxy is not good either. Only within the Church can we be guaranteed that, and only within the Church can we be shown for sure what constitutes a holy life.  

 92 
 on: Today at 01:26:21 AM 
Started by orthodox4life - Last post by Gebre Menfes Kidus
I love Halloween. It's a day of great inspiration for horror writers such as myself, and it's fun to harmlessly indulge in the vices of gluttony, lust, and darkness once a year. I think I'll sit back, eat and pass out candy, lust after the women in revealing costumes, and write some stories. Maybe I'll grill up some ribs for dinner or pressure my grandmother into making that fancy Mexican stew she always makes on Halloween.

Have I ever done anything to "witness" to children on this day? Heck no. What is this, Evangelicalism? They don't want religion they want candy. Using this holiday to "witness" to unsupervised, minor children without their parents seems to be immoral IMHO--how would we feel if Muslims did the same to our kids?

If you want to give the kids Scripture or something, go ahead. But don't be surprised if the kids throw it away to make room for more candy.

Don't quite agree with you, but I would love to read some of your horror stories. Hope you will share.  Smiley


Selam

We read them here, all the time.

Yeah, I was sort of thinking the same thing. (By no means limited to JamesR however.)


Selam

 93 
 on: Today at 01:25:46 AM 
Started by Jetavan - Last post by Gamliel
How many hospitals are fully equipped to handle Ebola patients in the USA?
I do not know, but I think I see your point that a healthy lifestyle will not stop Ebola, but it could give one a better chance to survive it. Undecided

 94 
 on: Today at 01:25:16 AM 
Started by charbelkaleab - Last post by Paisius
But that's moving the goal post. The question is not whether or not someone is Orthodox or whether or not the Church venerates them. The question is personal veneration. Unless you are going to say that only people who were visible members of the Orthodox Church can go to heaven then they are there and they can pray for us just like anyone else.

Are you in a position to determine that Therese in no way consciously rejected the Orthodox Church at any point in her life? Are you in a position to verify that Therese is with God and his saints?

You should be praying for Therese's soul. Not to her.


I'm in no position to know what anyone is thinking but I can see and I can think. No one does anything good without the Holy Spirit.

 95 
 on: Today at 01:25:03 AM 
Started by biro - Last post by DeniseDenise
Annual OC.net Men's Retreat:

"Hey, ladies...like what you see?"


The resultant news article from Orthodox Christianity Today:


'There was an unexplained upswing in female monastics this year.  Metropolitans and Archbishops from every jurisdiction have indicated that they are swamped trying to find room for all the new Sisters.   They are quoted as saying 'We have no idea why monasticism and celibacy suddenly became even more popular than before. Perhaps some celebrity converted and became a nun somewhere and the women want to follow suit, but really we are at a loss'



 96 
 on: Today at 01:24:19 AM 
Started by charbelkaleab - Last post by Paisius
and did she live her life in accordance with it's teachings?
It's entirely possible she lived her life in more accord with Christ's teachings than any of us.  Wink

Yes, and what of the virtuous Arian? Should we not venerate him too? A line has to be drawn somewhere.


Apples and oranges. You know better than that.  police

Heresy is heresy.


Reality isn't as simple. And a born and raised Roman Catholic is not Arius. 

I'm not saying that God won't have mercy on Therese. Your original premise was that she may have lived the teachings of Christ better than any of us. The teachings of Christ are only found in their fullest within the Orthodox Church. Therese was born a Roman Catholic, and died a Roman Catholic, i.e. outside the Church.


You are correct of course about the teachings but we don't have some special holiness or righteousness just because we are Orthodox. There were Roman Catholics who were closer to Christ than any of us will probably ever be.

 97 
 on: Today at 01:23:56 AM 
Started by charbelkaleab - Last post by Sam G
But that's moving the goal post. The question is not whether or not someone is Orthodox or whether or not the Church venerates them. The question is personal veneration. Unless you are going to say that only people who were visible members of the Orthodox Church can go to heaven then they are there and they can pray for us just like anyone else.

Are you in a position to determine that Therese in no way consciously rejected the Orthodox Church at any point in her life? Are you in a position to verify that Therese is with God and his saints?

You should be praying for Therese's soul. Not to her.

 98 
 on: Today at 01:21:37 AM 
Started by Minnesotan - Last post by hecma925
Lord, have mercy.

 99 
 on: Today at 01:21:08 AM 
Started by charbelkaleab - Last post by Paisius
But that's moving the goal post. The question is not whether or not someone is Orthodox or whether or not the Church venerates them. The question is personal veneration. Unless you are going to say that only people who were visible members of the Orthodox Church can go to heaven then they are there and they can pray for us just like anyone else.


SO basically you have zero problem that I go to my icon corner and venerate my lovely lovely icon of Calvin?




I couldn't care less who you venerate. If you can't see a difference between Calvin and St Therese you've got bigger issues.  Grin

 100 
 on: Today at 01:19:55 AM 
Started by charbelkaleab - Last post by hecma925
I'm not saying that God won't have mercy on Therese. Your original premise was that she may have lived the teachings of Christ better than any of us. The teachings of Christ are only found in their fullest within the Orthodox Church. Therese was born a Roman Catholic, and died a Roman Catholic, i.e. outside the Church.

And she was French.

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