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 91 
 on: Yesterday at 07:10:48 PM 
Started by JamesR - Last post by Maria
It may be off-topic, but I'm considering monasticism as well. I've read the Bible, and I've been struck by two passages. One of them is "Ye cannot serve both God and mammon." I've been thinking why I am even going to college, if I'm only going to work for money at a job that my heart is not set on. I'm studying engineering now, and I've liked science, but I don't like math, and I'm not sure if I'll be able to serve people through engineering. If working for the money is serving mammon, then that is not something that I would want to do. I would want to offer a perfect sacrifice to God and give him my whole life, not just a few years at the end of my life. Sorry if I'm rambling here, but another passage that struck me is " He who loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me." What would that mean anyway? I've been thinking about monasticism since I was 17. I'm 19 and will be turning 20 this May. I know this will come as a shock, but I have Asperger's Syndrome, but I am trying my best to overcome my autism. Is it possible for a man on the autistic spectrum to be a monk? I've told my mother once, but she thinks that it is just a fantasy, and I've told a therapist, but she thinks that I should wait until I've had a taste of the world. I just don't know if I really could be saved in the world, because I feel like I'm pipes that should be carrying water, but are full of sewage. I can't clean out this sewage on my own, or even if I turn on the water of the sacraments, but if I work in the monastic life, where I would be exposed to the sacraments and work, I might be able to clean myself up, God helping. Again, forgive me if I have said too much or something irrelevant.

From what I understand, monasteries in the Coptic Church at least, do like people of all varieties of expertise, not merely people who come to the monastery after quitting their education.  You'll never know when your fellow monks will need your expertise for their own monastery's benefit (like being a civil engineer for a new building project in the monastery grounds or expansion).  I think it's certainly beneficial to finish your studies, work to get an experience, and live your present life as if you're already a monk, as well as consult with your spiritual father.

Yes, whenever a physician or an R.N. becomes a monk, that can be a real blessing for the monastery.
Even a trade can help, such as a tailor. Monks always need raissas.

Currently, I am learning to make inner and outer raissas. People who have served an apprentice have an advantage over those who have not. Learning the fine details like hand stitching, correct use of hair canvas, interlinings and cotton stay tape, and how to use a clapper and tailor's ham really make a difference on how a garment fits and most importantly, its durability.

 92 
 on: Yesterday at 07:10:01 PM 
Started by Anna.T - Last post by icecreamsandwich
Another thing I have learned over the years as an Orthodox Christian is, it is not necessary to read excessive amounts of books on our theology. If one attends many of the services, which are hopefully mostly in English, then one would over time acquire a good deal of knowledge about Orthodoxy in the hymnography. It will become a part of the person in a very organic way, almost without realizing it. Over time, former mind sets will change just from singing the music. But if one attends a church that uses mostly a foreign language, reading Orthodox books and attending an Orthodox Bible study will be necessary to help acquire a more Orthodox mindset.

That's true, and one thing I greatly appreciate about how things are done - you go to Liturgy and realize quickly that the hymnography and readings, all the services are presented in such a way as to really immerse you in the teachings of the Church, and after a while it starts making sense and building upon itself. I'm really glad that you're required to be a catechumen for that one year or so - being able to see the cycle of services throughout the year (most especially the less common ones, like Matins/Vespers, Compline when done with a Priest in attendance, etc), really does help you learn more about the Church than you could likely learn just by reading. I mean, for my part I remember not knowing what on earth the Nicene Creed was the first time I went (having only encountered it once) and after a few months walking to get the mail and realizing I somehow was able to recite it almost perfectly without having attempted to memorize it. And I say this as one who would prefer to read haha. Very organic is right...

 93 
 on: Yesterday at 07:08:30 PM 
Started by Jetavan - Last post by Maria
it just hasn't been because it's not considered worth the investment... yet...  police

I'd say we still got a few million years more before it becomes a problem.

The Dinosaurs' reign lasted roughly 185 million years before an asteroid hit the reset button and they went good-bye.

Anatomically modern humans have only been around for 100,000 years. We got time  Cheesy

By the time an asteroid hits us again, we'll probably already be extinct by some manmade calamity.

As my above post touched on, the real concern seems to not be "world-destroying" asteroids but "city-killers." These smaller ones are largely undetected until they enter our atmosphere, and could wipe out an entire populace in an instant if our luck wore off.

We are under God's Providential care. Like the virgins mentioned in the Gospels, we must be ready at all times to meet our Lord and Bridegroom.

 94 
 on: Yesterday at 07:07:08 PM 
Started by Jetavan - Last post by Jetavan
FAMAGUSTA, Cyprus (AP) — An unexpected moment during the Good Friday service in a long-abandoned church in Cyprus' breakaway north illustrated how religion is helping to bring together Christian Greek Cypriots and Muslim Turkish Cypriots on this ethnically divided island.

It came when Turkish Cypriot Umit Inatci handed the key of the church of Agios Georgios Exorinos, in the medieval center of Famagusta, to the city's Greek Orthodox Metropolitan Vasilios, saying: "This is not gift, it's something that is surrendered to its owner."

Rapturous applause greeted the announcement by Inatci, who helped make possible the first Holy Week service at the 14th-century church in nearly 60 years.
....
"We have to give a good example to the Middle East," Atalay told The Associated Press. "This is our gift to the Middle East."

 95 
 on: Yesterday at 07:02:11 PM 
Started by xariskai - Last post by DeniseDenise
just checking...since its 'overdo it' week...Wink

 96 
 on: Yesterday at 07:01:37 PM 
Started by xariskai - Last post by Asteriktos
 Cheesy  Cheesy Nah, just one. When it's the smaller ones I eat two at a time though.

 97 
 on: Yesterday at 07:01:34 PM 
Started by JamesR - Last post by minasoliman
It may be off-topic, but I'm considering monasticism as well. I've read the Bible, and I've been struck by two passages. One of them is "Ye cannot serve both God and mammon." I've been thinking why I am even going to college, if I'm only going to work for money at a job that my heart is not set on. I'm studying engineering now, and I've liked science, but I don't like math, and I'm not sure if I'll be able to serve people through engineering. If working for the money is serving mammon, then that is not something that I would want to do. I would want to offer a perfect sacrifice to God and give him my whole life, not just a few years at the end of my life. Sorry if I'm rambling here, but another passage that struck me is " He who loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me." What would that mean anyway? I've been thinking about monasticism since I was 17. I'm 19 and will be turning 20 this May. I know this will come as a shock, but I have Asperger's Syndrome, but I am trying my best to overcome my autism. Is it possible for a man on the autistic spectrum to be a monk? I've told my mother once, but she thinks that it is just a fantasy, and I've told a therapist, but she thinks that I should wait until I've had a taste of the world. I just don't know if I really could be saved in the world, because I feel like I'm pipes that should be carrying water, but are full of sewage. I can't clean out this sewage on my own, or even if I turn on the water of the sacraments, but if I work in the monastic life, where I would be exposed to the sacraments and work, I might be able to clean myself up, God helping. Again, forgive me if I have said too much or something irrelevant.

From what I understand, monasteries in the Coptic Church at least, do like people of all varieties of expertise, not merely people who come to the monastery after quitting their education.  You'll never know when your fellow monks will need your expertise for their own monastery's benefit (like being a civil engineer for a new building project in the monastery grounds or expansion).  I think it's certainly beneficial to finish your studies, work to get an experience, and live your present life as if you're already a monk, as well as consult with your spiritual father.

 98 
 on: Yesterday at 06:58:12 PM 
Started by xariskai - Last post by DeniseDenise


all six?

 99 
 on: Yesterday at 06:55:04 PM 
Started by Garuda - Last post by Asteriktos
Study suggests casual use of marijuana leads to changes in the brain

Researchers at Northwestern University studied a small sample of patients ages 18 to 25 who use marijuana casually or for recreational use. All patients used the drug differently, some every day, others every month. The study found that young adults in that age group who use marijuana have "significant abnormalities" in the brain...
Is that why you look like this? Grin

I do !?!  Shocked  I was told recently that I look like this guy... isn't that enough to deal with?


 100 
 on: Yesterday at 06:53:45 PM 
Started by Sirach - Last post by podkarpatska
American Orthodoxy and Parish Congregationalism by Fr. Nicholas Ferencz

Do you think he is on to something here?  It may not be THE problem, but is it A problem?

It is not THE problem, but it more than A problem. (I know Father Nicholas and I would suspect that he would state the case as I noted.)

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