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71
Liturgy / Re: Three Challenging Questions Regarding the Liturgy
« Last post by Alpo on Today at 10:02:27 AM »
...but it's a good demonstration of 'I was a strange and you took me in'.

I disagree. Inviting them to one's house would be a demonstration of that. IMO people around here have a bit too care-free attitude towards choir-singing in a church choir. It's as sacral function as, say, serving in the altar. If we don't allow non-Orthodox altar servers it doesn't make sense to allow non-Orthodox choir members.

Post-liturgical coffee hours are a whole another thing though. Nothing wrong with that whoever is organizing them.
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Worthwhile discussion is taking place here, but wouldn't it be better to rephrase the original question to 'Should I commune if I intend to break the law?' That puts the focus where it really belongs, on each individual her/himself rather than on her/his neighbour. (It's my impression that while in general priests are interested in each one of us an an individual, they don't much appreciate parishioners rushing up to them bearing tales about others in the congregation--to say nothing of being told they shouldn't give communion to this or that believer because...)

This is a very valid point, and I am inclined to agree.  That said, what prompted this was my being irked by what I consider to be the misguided organization of a provisional church in the "Jungle," which seems to me to be a dubious approach both on humanitarian and pastoral grounds.  I think it would be better if the clergy in question sought to arrange a regularization for these migrants in the Schengen Area, where they could benefit from proper housing and so on.  The jungle is needlessly dangerous, and exists to facilitate dangerous law-breaking in the form of what amounts to reckless attempts to sneak into the UK on ferries or through the Chunnel.  I think the clergy need to encourage people to reoent of this; it is sinful and personally dangerous, needlessly so.


And since as Finnjames points out ,
It being up to priests.

You are not one. Thus your personal opinion of migrants and where or how they commune is not what matters.

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13. All the fancy 'education' and you find out the you don't know squat.
74
Old Riters are cool. The pics look so Russian that it's almost ridiculous.
75

Why? Lol

Because he lasted longer without meeting the pope. And they all thought that Moscow Patriarch is super-orthodox and important.

They all think that in Moscow because they have to.
Oh, and congrats, it seems?
76
Religious Topics / Re: Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill to meet next week
« Last post by Alpo on Today at 09:41:37 AM »
Back on topic for a moment here - my understanding is that it is just a meeting to discuss certain topics - primarily the persecution of Middle East Christians, not the imminent unification of the Christian Church.   :D

Well, Russia, a sort of an Orthodox Country is trying to save Christians in the Middle East, while Roman-Catholic and Protestant countries are trying to wipe them out by supporting the terrorists and undermining secular regime of president Assad. So if pope Francis has no any influence on those countries, he better remain silent on the topic.

Holy Greece, Holy Serbia, Holy Russia, have mercy on us.
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I'm pretty uneducated in such matters concerning "Church administration" and jurisdictions.
Where can I read further about that?

I too, plus the verbiage and definitions. I gather, for example, there are 14 autocephalous flavors of Orthodoxy, mostlyl based on geographical regions due to historical matters.
15

Yeah, I read that too, then elsewhere it was 14.
CRY, CRY, CRY for unity in this gig and yet cannot agree on identity, space & time!
Who are we? what country? and what calendar!
Perturbed it can be.
78
Reviews / Re: What is everyone reading?
« Last post by LenInSebastopol on Today at 09:35:37 AM »
The Pillars of the Earth, by Ken Follett

A 974 page novel about a 12th century stone mason whose life dream/dream job is being a master builder working on a cathedral. So far so good (~65 pp. in)...

A must read and should be mandatory in public education.
His other books, meh.
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Religious Topics / Re: Should we commune if we intend to break the law?
« Last post by wgw on Today at 09:33:41 AM »
Worthwhile discussion is taking place here, but wouldn't it be better to rephrase the original question to 'Should I commune if I intend to break the law?' That puts the focus where it really belongs, on each individual her/himself rather than on her/his neighbour. (It's my impression that while in general priests are interested in each one of us an an individual, they don't much appreciate parishioners rushing up to them bearing tales about others in the congregation--to say nothing of being told they shouldn't give communion to this or that believer because...)

This is a very valid point, and I am inclined to agree.  That said, what prompted this was my being irked by what I consider to be the misguided organization of a provisional church in the "Jungle," which seems to me to be a dubious approach both on humanitarian and pastoral grounds.  I think it would be better if the clergy in question sought to arrange a regularization for these migrants in the Schengen Area, where they could benefit from proper housing and so on.  The jungle is needlessly dangerous, and exists to facilitate dangerous law-breaking in the form of what amounts to reckless attempts to sneak into the UK on ferries or through the Chunnel.  I think the clergy need to encourage people to reoent of this; it is sinful and personally dangerous, needlessly so.
80
Back on topic for a moment here - my understanding is that it is just a meeting to discuss certain topics - primarily the persecution of Middle East Christians, not the imminent unification of the Christian Church.   :D

That is not how Moscow will spin it.
Whatever is said or occurs they will be 'on top'.
Bet'cha 5ยข
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