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 31 
 on: Yesterday at 10:48:25 PM 
Started by Ebor - Last post by Volnutt
3/5 Classes have grades in, and I have two As and one P, making me having a 4.0 currently for the semester and by default, my entire grad school career because it is my first semester.

wont last, but it's nice for now
You don't know that Smiley

 32 
 on: Yesterday at 10:48:03 PM 
Started by Superior Practices - Last post by Bob2
In our parish we tend stand pretty much the whole time, in part because of space issues there just isn't room for everybody to sit, but there are certainly times when it is acceptable to sit. We stand to help us remind that we are an active participant at Divine Liturgy through are prayers, liturgy is the "work of the people" we aren't spectators or an audience. Yes we get tired, and when you need to sit you can, but you do get used to it, and after seeing 90 yo babushkas put you to shame with their standing ability you improve pretty quickly.

At our parish we have a "traffic light" system of three lampadas above the royal doors to guide the faithful on when they should stand:

Just middle lamp lit (◇◈◇) = may light candles or move if needed, may sit if needed, no prostrations on knees allowed

No lamps lit (◇◇◇) = may light candles or move if needed, may sit if needed, prostrations on knees at appointed times (for
    weekdays only)

Just outside lamps lit (◈◇◈) = no moving about or talking at all unless there is a fire or some other catastrophe, stand if you are able,
prostrations on knees at appointed times (for weekdays only)

All three lamps lit (◈◈◈) = no moving about or talking at all unless there is a fire or some other catastrophe, stand if you are able,
no prostrations on knees allowed




Has anybody else seen a similar system?

 33 
 on: Yesterday at 10:46:16 PM 
Started by Nephi - Last post by Volnutt
.... and poor St Joan is utterly terrified, despite the archangel's presence. Hardly facing her fate with equanimity, is she?  Tongue Roll Eyes
Let's burn you at the stake and see how much equanimity you have.  Tongue Roll Eyes

I didn't know that being a Saint meant being immune to fear and the pain of burning alive

Icons portray heavenly realities and spiritual perfection. Proper icons of martyr-saints which show their martyrdom always show them as dispassionate. The hymnography of martyr-saints also speaks of their bravery, fortitude, and their anticipation of their heavenly reward for their refusal to renounce their faith. Many are known to have prayed for their tormentors, asking God to forgive them, as Christ did for those who crucified Him.

Here is a good example of a martyr accepting his fate, Protomartyr Stephen:

Fair enough. I thought you were mocking a 16 year-old girl for being a tad disconcerted over being burned alive.

 34 
 on: Yesterday at 10:38:07 PM 
Started by Fabio Leite - Last post by Yurysprudentsiya
I don't know if only I myself have this concern, but I am not convinced the American population is one capable of guiding ourselves in any profoundly Orthodox manner. I myself am relieved the ancient sees continue to have a guiding presence here.

Not to be polemical, and the example is too slight to bear the lesson I want to make out of it, but let me hold up this paragraph for some observation:

Quote
As such, we ask our brothers of the Assembly to consider a broader question: For what purpose has God, in His infinite Wisdom and Providence, brought us together in this country? Is our answer a positive response to the Lord’s commandment to “preach the Gospel to every creature”? Is our answer to look to the model provided St. Tikhon at the turn of the last century, and to “share our spiritual wealth … with others who are deprived of these blessings”? In His High Priestly Prayer in St. John’s Gospel, our Lord Jesus Christ prays to the Father and asks that “they may be one, as we are”. How is this to be realized if we place limits on our responsibility to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church? St. Paul tells the Galatians that “There is neither Jew nor Greek ... for you are all one in Christ Jesus” [Gal. 3:28] Does this not direct us to see no difference between the immigrant from Russia and the one from Indonesia, between the one from Africa and the one from Central America? Does this not direct us to see the Agnostic, the Protestant, the Buddhist or Taoist in the same way we see the marginal Orthodox Christian?

Could this be imagined in the mouth of, say, St. John Chrysostom, or even St. John of Kronstadt? Whether or not, one can certainly imagine it in the mouth of most American denominational conferences.

There is also the compounding concern that, as a rule, when America gains control of enough of a portion of anything, she tends soon to control it, at least to an outsize extent, worldwide.

In short, at least I myself am more concerned about salvation than about American face and influence. Indeed, if that weren't true, I'd have found some well-positioned Protestant sect to join.

I am for an autocephalous American Church, but I wouldn't have a problem with there being an autonomous American Church in the interim.   It is a special situation that calls for special solutions.  Although, of course, I would prefer any such autonomous Church to be under the omophorion of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, as is consistent with the canons.  I don't think anyone could ever agree on which single Church the American Church should be subject to, however, even if we picked a non-contentious Church such as the Church of Poland or the Church of Georgia.

 35 
 on: Yesterday at 10:37:15 PM 
Started by Mor Ephrem - Last post by LBK
Ukrainian Lutherans have already done something like this.
Doesn't make it right.

Precisely.

It's little different to those who dabble in iconography because it's "spiritual", and end up producing schlock. Bells and smells alone do not equate to authentic worship.

 36 
 on: Yesterday at 10:36:04 PM 
Started by Orthodox Youth - Last post by Alveus Lacuna
Isn't it incredibly racist to talk so much about Greek vs. Arab in the first place?

I'm not trusting some stupid internet blog over an Orthodox Patriarch.

 37 
 on: Yesterday at 10:34:20 PM 
Started by Fabio Leite - Last post by Porter ODoran
I don't know if only I myself have this concern, but I am not convinced the American population is one capable of guiding ourselves in any profoundly Orthodox manner. I myself am relieved the ancient Sees continue to have a guiding presence here.

Not to be polemical, and the example is too slight to bear the lesson I want to make out of it, but let me hold up this paragraph for some observation:

Quote
As such, we ask our brothers of the Assembly to consider a broader question: For what purpose has God, in His infinite Wisdom and Providence, brought us together in this country? Is our answer a positive response to the Lord’s commandment to “preach the Gospel to every creature”? Is our answer to look to the model provided St. Tikhon at the turn of the last century, and to “share our spiritual wealth … with others who are deprived of these blessings”? In His High Priestly Prayer in St. John’s Gospel, our Lord Jesus Christ prays to the Father and asks that “they may be one, as we are”. How is this to be realized if we place limits on our responsibility to be the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church? St. Paul tells the Galatians that “There is neither Jew nor Greek ... for you are all one in Christ Jesus” [Gal. 3:28] Does this not direct us to see no difference between the immigrant from Russia and the one from Indonesia, between the one from Africa and the one from Central America? Does this not direct us to see the Agnostic, the Protestant, the Buddhist or Taoist in the same way we see the marginal Orthodox Christian?

Could this be imagined in the mouth of, say, St. John Chrysostom, or even St. John of Kronstadt? Whether or not, one can certainly imagine it in the mouths of most American denominational conferences.

There is also the compounding concern that, as a rule, when America gains control of enough of a portion of anything, she tends soon to control it, at least to an outsize extent, worldwide.

In short, at least I myself am more concerned about salvation than about American face and influence. Indeed, if that weren't true, I'd have found some well-positioned Protestant sect to join.

 38 
 on: Yesterday at 10:31:28 PM 
Started by Mor Ephrem - Last post by Shlomlokh
Ukrainian Lutherans have already done something like this.
Doesn't make it right.

 39 
 on: Yesterday at 10:24:13 PM 
Started by Fabio Leite - Last post by Yurysprudentsiya
Please note, per Basil 320's earlier discussion here (or somewhere) and other things I've heard, that Metropolitan Hilarion appears to have had the cart ahead of the horse when he spoke about the agreement having been reached on how autocephaly is to be recognized, i.e., by a unanimous vote of the Mother Churches.

Unless something has changed recently of which I am not aware, the topic of how autocephaly is to be determined was removed from the agenda of the upcoming Great and Holy Council, when the number of agenda topics were lowered from ten to eight, back in March.  Unless something has changed, it won't be discussed.

If someone knows anything further, I'd welcome more information about it.




 40 
 on: Yesterday at 10:22:25 PM 
Started by Mor Ephrem - Last post by sakura95
I really don't know whether to be happy or shocked by this. Maybe it is a step in the right direction for the Anglican Communion but then again, they might(I didn't watch the whole video) alter the original Liturgy to be more "Protestant" just like how the Byzantine Lutherans did.

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