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 31 
 on: Today at 02:51:50 AM 
Started by qawe - Last post by LBK
http://juniaproject.com/chanting-for-change-coptic-church/

The author is, by her own admission, a "Christian" feminist. She claims credit for starting the female choir movement in the churches of LA.

"We fought for our right as women to participate in chanting in church services, and we have become a model for other Coptic churches in the Los Angeles area who want to begin providing liturgical roles for women in their services. This group has become a forum through which we have advocated for the right of women to have a voice in our community."

This on its own is not disturbing. What is disturbing is the site Mariam has chosen to submit her article to, thus associating her cause with the site's:
"The Junia Project is a community of women and men advocating for the inclusion of women at all levels of leadership in the Christian church and for mutuality in marriage. We believe that when interpreted correctly, the Bible teaches that both men and women are called to serve at all levels of the Church"

Source: http://juniaproject.com/about-2/

I think this is strongly suggestive of the answer to your question, AntoniousNikolas.

This group seems similar to the one which produces the St Nina Quarterly.  Tongue

 32 
 on: Today at 02:51:37 AM 
Started by Kostya - Last post by Kostya
You come across as very tense. I would first and foremost encourage you to seek professional help with your anxiety. I have struggled with it myself.

Have you actually tried contacting the church in question?

One visit to a local place of worship is not enough information to form an opinion about an entire group of people. Are there other churches in your area?

I would be happy to help you get in contact with a nearby church. You can PM (private message) me your details if you would like.

Forgive my tone. I did not mean to sound tense or angry. I am apprehensive because of things I have heard. There was (I say was because it's gone now) a Russian church near where I live that was unwelcoming not only to converts, but to anybody who was not ethnically Russian. I suffer from anxiety and paranoia, but my fears are not baseless.

 33 
 on: Today at 02:49:42 AM 
Started by Kostya - Last post by Aquensis
Where do you live? You may be surprised and there is someone on the board that lives right next to you...

 34 
 on: Today at 02:48:47 AM 
Started by Kostya - Last post by Kostya
Quote
I feel that very few Orthodox believers will disagree with what I have to say: Orthodoxy in America, as a general rule, is far from welcoming.

The fact that there are a great many converts to Orthodoxy easily disproves this.  Smiley

Quote
I do not feel comfortable attending Divine Liturgy, or attending at all.

A central part of becoming Orthodox (including beginning to learn about the faith) is church attendance. The hymns and icons are not merely words and pictures, but they express what the church believes and teaches. Becoming Orthodox does not come simply from book learning, but from participating in the life of the Church, and cultivating a relationship with a priest who will be your spiritual guide.

Quote
From my observations of the Orthodox community, it seems that they would never expect that once in a million years somebody would want to convert. My one visit to an Orthodox church confirmed this.

See my first comment. Your experience in no way represents how the Church does things.

Let me rephrase. I am not comfortable attending in my current status as a stranger. If I knew somebody there, or could talk to somebody before-hand, I would gladly attend.

 35 
 on: Today at 02:48:33 AM 
Started by Kostya - Last post by Aquensis
To come to your wits end at this point, before actually having done anything, is foolish. It is a self defeating disorder. Just go. If it doesn't work out go to another Orthodox church. Every one I've been to people have been very welcoming. And while there are may be more "cradle" Orthodox than converts in our country in church it is a different story, if they are actually in church probably half of them will be converts.

 36 
 on: Today at 02:47:54 AM 
Started by qawe - Last post by qawe
http://juniaproject.com/chanting-for-change-coptic-church/

The author is, by her own admission, a "Christian" feminist. She claims credit for starting the female choir movement in the churches of LA.

"We fought for our right as women to participate in chanting in church services, and we have become a model for other Coptic churches in the Los Angeles area who want to begin providing liturgical roles for women in their services. This group has become a forum through which we have advocated for the right of women to have a voice in our community."

This on its own is not disturbing. What is disturbing is the site Mariam has chosen to submit her article to, thus associating her cause with the site's:
"The Junia Project is a community of women and men advocating for the inclusion of women at all levels of leadership in the Christian church and for mutuality in marriage. We believe that when interpreted correctly, the Bible teaches that both men and women are called to serve at all levels of the Church"

Source: http://juniaproject.com/about-2/

I think this is strongly suggestive of the answer to your question, AntoniousNikolas.

 37 
 on: Today at 02:47:11 AM 
Started by Marc1152 - Last post by Chiere
I like my coffee like I like my women. Smiley

Bold and strong, right?

 38 
 on: Today at 02:47:11 AM 
Started by Aindriú - Last post by Chiere
Teddy bears? I am giving my niece a little black baby doll I literally found in the hood thrown out in the trash--on the ground, not in the can. l named her Latanya. Banned to the West End of Louisville. Get me some Indi's by the way.

Banned because I'm tired of being moderated

Okay, I'll shut up about that.

Banned because your new avatar rmeminds me of a 60's movie scene.

 39 
 on: Today at 02:46:59 AM 
Started by Kostya - Last post by lovesupreme
You come across as very tense. I would first and foremost encourage you to seek professional help with your anxiety. I have struggled with it myself.

Have you actually tried contacting the church in question?

One visit to a local place of worship is not enough information to form an opinion about an entire group of people. Are there other churches in your area?

I would be happy to help you get in contact with a nearby church. You can PM (private message) me your details if you would like.

 40 
 on: Today at 02:45:08 AM 
Started by Minnesotan - Last post by dzheremi
Quote
Given that Copts and Ethiopians have had lots of contact with Somalis in the past, one would think that if any Orthodox (I'm including OO of course) liturgy has been translated into Somali, it would be the Coptic or Ethiopian ones. Does anyone here know if this is the case?

No...the closest you're going to get to that is Oromo, who are a people who are very closely related to the Somalis (I mentioned this briefly in the Somali Christian thread I started that you linked to), and speak a very closely related language to Somali. You can find Oromo Orthodox mezmur (paraliturgical songs), but sadly many Oromo are Protestants instead of Orthodox as they once were. I'm not Ethiopian, but I have read in various Ethiopian history books that there is some resentment among the Oromo at being politically disadvantaged during the imperial days when they are in fact the majority of the society, so this helped the growth of Protestant missions among them, since Tewahedo Orthodoxy is seen by some people as a Semitic/Highlander thing, whereas they are Cushitic people (these are different ethnolinguistic groupings). I had read some years ago that the majority of Oromo are Muslim, but talking to Ethiopian friends more recently they say that this is no longer the case. It is more evenly split now, though my friends did not mention how much of the Christian percentage is Orthodox versus how much is Protestant. The Protestants tended to focus their efforts on the southern part of the country, where the Orthodox influence is less strong (many people in these areas were animists), so you will find the highest concentration of Protestants in places like the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples region (55% Protestant, 20% Orthodox, 14% Muslim, but the Orthodox were 28% 20 years ago, whereas the Muslims were 16%...so the Orthodox have lost the most to the Protestants, who were only about 35% in 1994).

Anyway, so there are Orthodox people very close to the Somalis culturally/linguistically, but as far as I know from talking to Ethiopians there has not been an effort to evangelize Somalis in particular, much less translate the Ethiopian liturgies into Somali. There are historical reasons for this (Somalis have been the traditional enemies of Christian Ethiopia for centuries, and have done much damage to the country and its church), but who knows what the future may hold.

Orthodox Mezmur in Afan Oromo - "Kidane Mihret" sung by Deacon Geremu Bayesa

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