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 11 
 on: Today at 04:00:37 AM 
Started by andrewlya - Last post by sakura95
Hi all,
are Christians ever allowed to fight and go into war?

I mean we don't have a "jihad" sort of thing, but if Christians are constantly persecuted, killed or expelled from Lands, as in the case of Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, what are Christians allowed to do?
I know our beloved Jesus preached peace and said that we can't response to vilonence with violence, which is the best way in the world if only other religions would follow that...
God bless

A Christian citizen can help by donating to organizations helping these persecuted Christians out and pray for them.

A Sovereign or Government can actually help by negotiating with the administrative body of the Islamic State for the safety and well-being of Christians and other minorities in their territory. All peaceful and diplomatic solutions must be enacted first with war being the last resort and the very thing that should be avoided if possible.

If all else fails, war is the only option remaining and must be fought ethically with the primary motivation being peace rather than for the Sovereign's/ Government's self gain. Also, all territories gained from the Islamic State in the event of a war should be given back to their respective countries rather than to be exploited and occupied by the Sovereign/Government that taken military action against the Islamic State.

My response here is based on Aquinas' "Just War Theory" which had its roots in St Augustine and the ancient Greek Philosophers.

 12 
 on: Today at 04:00:31 AM 
Started by arrow prayer - Last post by Father H
Growing up Protestant I've thought the filloque controversy to be a rather minor controversy and you may correct me if I'm wrong, but is the controversy not about the filloque per se but about what appeared a Roman unilateral intrusion on settled doctrine?
Personally I see it as irrelevant because the Trinity is coeternal and coequal.

Now my position is that the Holy Spirit proceeded exactly at the same time as the Logos was begotten, and in that case both understandings (filloque or no) are true.

The bolded above is an Orthodox position (if we remove the "at the same time" and replace it with "coincident", since it was before time came into being).  Filioque, by the definition of Florence, is not.  Both cannot be true at the same time.  But even long before Florence, St. Photios pointed out that the "and the Son" addition makes the relationship of the Trinity that of father, son, and grandchild.   But if we are looking at the Psalms, the Logos and Breath (Spirit) proceed from God that Father coincidentally (or "simultaneously" by its old definition) in eternity, the one by begottenness, the other by spiration.  

With All due respect Father, Photius had an extremely poor understanding of the Filioque...

With all due respect, atheists, Muslims, and Jews have claimed that St. Athanasius had a poor understanding of the Incarnation of Christ instead of addressing the particular point.  If you would like to disprove the actual CLAIM, then be my guest.  However, now you must prove two claims, namely that what I posted from St. Photios was wrong, and also you must now substantiate your claim that St. Photios had a "poor understanding"  Roll Eyes of the filioque.  

 13 
 on: Today at 03:57:57 AM 
Started by arrow prayer - Last post by Cavaradossi
Growing up Protestant I've thought the filloque controversy to be a rather minor controversy and you may correct me if I'm wrong, but is the controversy not about the filloque per se but about what appeared a Roman unilateral intrusion on settled doctrine?
Personally I see it as irrelevant because the Trinity is coeternal and coequal.

Now my position is that the Holy Spirit proceeded exactly at the same time as the Logos was begotten, and in that case both understandings (filloque or no) are true.

The bolded above is an Orthodox position (if we remove the "at the same time" and replace it with "coincident", since it was before time came into being).  Filioque, by the definition of Florence, is not.  Both cannot be true at the same time.  But even long before Florence, St. Photios pointed out that the "and the Son" addition makes the relationship of the Trinity that of father, son, and grandchild.   But if we are looking at the Psalms, the Logos and Breath (Spirit) proceed from God that Father coincidentally (or "simultaneously" by its old definition) in eternity, the one by begottenness, the other by spiration. 

With All due respect Father, Photius had an extremely poor understanding of the Filioque...

Have you ever read and studied the Mystagogy of the Holy Spirit, attributed to Saint Photius? If your answer is anything but yes, what qualifies you to make such a judgment?

 14 
 on: Today at 03:16:54 AM 
Started by Hiywot - Last post by Hailemariam
In Ethiopia we call her St. Arsema. Armenians call her St. Hripsime. She is not actually Armenian by birth but was martyred by King Tiridates of Armenia. We call the king as Dirtades. In Ethiopia, St. Arsema is currently being highly popular than ever because of the miracles seen at the churches consecrated in her name. The number of churches built in her name is also increasing. And in almost any spiritual book shop in Ethiopia one can find “Gadla Kidist Arsema” i.e., the book of the life of St. Arsema. I myself love this saint very much and consider her as one of my matron saints. I hope she will, one day, allow me visit her church in Armenia where her remains are kept.

Now my questions:

1. How is St. Arsema revered in Armenia? Do the faithful consider her as their matron saint? Is there a seasonal or annual pilgrimage to her church? How many churches in Armenia are named by St. Arsema?

2. Where can I find her icon? Unfortunately, most of the icons distributed in Ethiopia, in the name of St. Arsema are mistakenly the icons of St. Barbara. The name of St. Barbara is written on the icons in Greek. Nobody reads Greek and therefore people buy St. Barbara’s icon and revere it as St. Arsema.

Sincerely,

Hiywot

Dear, Hiywot you are right the Icon of saint Arsema in Ethiopian this modern age is not very accessible to the general public. In addition other saint's Icons have been mistakenly taken as Arsema. It is not only Saint Barbara but also Saint Kyriaki, Saint Catherine Alexandria and Saint Lucia are called as Saint Arsema Icon.
However, the scarcity of Information dose not mean that Ethiopian Iconographers didnot know about her because I have Seen Two Icons Of Saint Arsema painted by Ethiopian Iconographers.

The First is in a manuscript about lives of martyrs (Gedle Semaetat) Ethiopian Monastery dedicated to saint Jhon (Yohannes) near Mekelle, Tigray. This books is suppose to weigh abut 36kg. I dont have the Icon though found on this manuscript b/c my camera batteries were dead at that moment but i can show you some Icons found there.

Link to the image of the book:- https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5_9e_DZJEwOZ3F1UmpVamhJZzQ/edit?usp=sharing and
                                           https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5_9e_DZJEwONDBHQU9xaU9HRFk/edit?usp=sharing
The Second Icon that I found about saint Arsema in Ethiopia is a diptych panel painting by the First Gondarien Style (around 17th Century) the place of origin and current place is unknown.

Link to the image of the panel:- https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5_9e_DZJEwOd2I3ZkpKZVJTbjg/edit?usp=sharing

I hope you and every one on this forum found this info helpful. If GOD willing I am in the process of creating website about Ethiopian Orthodox Icons   and share articles and other materials with fellow Orthodox brothers and Sisters.

 15 
 on: Today at 02:49:55 AM 
Started by Indocern - Last post by xariskai
The more reliable witnesses in describing how any two things are related are those who have studied both. With regard to science and religion, polemicists on any side of any "debate" who have studied neither, or who have studied only one avenue to a profound depth, are not genuinely reliable guides to all sides of the question.

www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2014/01/orthodox-bishop-answers-4-questions-on.html

 16 
 on: Today at 02:47:05 AM 
Started by Hiywot - Last post by Hailemariam
Dear, Hiywot you are right the Icon of saint Arsema in Ethiopian this modern age is not very accessible to the general public. In addition other saint's Icons have been mistakenly taken as Arsema. It is not only Saint Barbara but also Saint Kyriaki, Saint Catherine Alexandria and Saint Lucia are called as Saint Arsema Icon.
However, the scarcity of Information dose not mean that Ethiopian Iconographers didnot know about her because I have Seen Two Icons Of Saint Arsema painted by Ethiopian Iconographers.

The First is in a manuscript about lives of martyrs (Gedle Semaetat) Ethiopian Monastery dedicated to saint Jhon (Yohannes) near Mekelle, Tigray. This books is suppose to weigh abut 36kg. I dont have the Icon though found on this manuscript b/c my camera batteries were dead at that moment but i can show you some Icons found there.

Link to the image of the book:- https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5_9e_DZJEwOZ3F1UmpVamhJZzQ/edit?usp=sharing and
                                           https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5_9e_DZJEwONDBHQU9xaU9HRFk/edit?usp=sharing
The Second Icon that I found about saint Arsema in Ethiopia is a diptych panel painting by the First Gondarien Style (around 17th Century) the place of origin and current place is unknown.

Link to the image of the panel:- https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5_9e_DZJEwOd2I3ZkpKZVJTbjg/edit?usp=sharing

I hope you and every one on this forum found this info helpful. If GOD willing I am in the process of creating website about Ethiopian Orthodox Icons   and share articles and other materials with fellow Orthodox brothers and Sisters.

 17 
 on: Today at 02:36:08 AM 
Started by arrow prayer - Last post by Wandile
Growing up Protestant I've thought the filloque controversy to be a rather minor controversy and you may correct me if I'm wrong, but is the controversy not about the filloque per se but about what appeared a Roman unilateral intrusion on settled doctrine?
Personally I see it as irrelevant because the Trinity is coeternal and coequal.

Now my position is that the Holy Spirit proceeded exactly at the same time as the Logos was begotten, and in that case both understandings (filloque or no) are true.

The bolded above is an Orthodox position (if we remove the "at the same time" and replace it with "coincident", since it was before time came into being).  Filioque, by the definition of Florence, is not.  Both cannot be true at the same time.  But even long before Florence, St. Photios pointed out that the "and the Son" addition makes the relationship of the Trinity that of father, son, and grandchild.   But if we are looking at the Psalms, the Logos and Breath (Spirit) proceed from God that Father coincidentally (or "simultaneously" by its old definition) in eternity, the one by begottenness, the other by spiration.  

With All due respect Father, Photius had an extremely poor understanding of the Filioque...

 18 
 on: Today at 02:29:47 AM 
Started by Maria - Last post by minasoliman
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
my point in posting that article was to show Jews don't have a problem with the Islamic God/ Allah and can even pray where Muslims do.  Churchs are off limits for both. I feel that shows that my statement Jews and Muslims have the same God and Christians don't. Some value to the topic at hand.
As for shekinah there is different views I hold it means present not dwell in  That's my view and your welcome to hold your view.


You make an interesting point.  I can't deny that.  It seems however, Judaism allows for both an indwelling God and a non-indwelling God at the same time.  Judaism today sounds like a living contradiction of itself, as you pointed out earlier.  Perhaps Jews have no problems in praying in a mosque, but Islam is not as flexible in this regard as Jews are.
actually more flexible. I just looked it up and I was wrong oh no did I just say that laugh
It is permissible to pray in any place, as long the place is clean (tahir). However, praying in a church, temple or any other religious place without any necessity is makrooh.

It is possible that some people of those religions may not like to see us praying in their places of worship and we should not hurt other people’s feelings. If we have to pray in those places then we should take proper permission from the authorities that govern those sanctuaries.
http://www.onislam.net/english/ask-the-scholar/acts-of-worship/prayer/places-of-prayer-mosques/175423.html

Interesting...thank you for that.

I don't remember you saying that.  But I do remember you mentioning Judaism has flexibility in belief of God, whereas Islam does not.  I extended this same logic to places of worship, although as you showed, that's not necessarily the case.

 19 
 on: Today at 02:24:47 AM 
Started by Maria - Last post by jewish voice
It is not without surprise I think that Judaism and Islam carry a lot of similarities and the permission to pray in a mosque is interesting.  However, this still does not mean there is a theological agreement on the divine nature between Judaism and Islam.  In fact, I will concede even within Judaism there is disagreement, but the main point is there is a lot of Jews who do believe in the indwelling.  For God to dwell in a particular place, like Jerusalem, Mount Sinai, the temple, the tabernacle, all have in fact been clearly stated as such in the Old Testament, in the Talmud, and in many Jewish commentators.  Some Jewish rabbis have stated that the Shekinah is the divine essence in distinct form.  The views of Egyptian Jews and the prominent Jews Fr. John Romanides had dialogues with also deserve some attention to what Jewish belief is.
my point in posting that article was to show Jews don't have a problem with the Islamic God/ Allah and can even pray where Muslims do.  Churchs are off limits for both. I feel that shows that my statement Jews and Muslims have the same God and Christians don't. Some value to the topic at hand.
As for shekinah there is different views I hold it means present not dwell in  That's my view and your welcome to hold your view.


You make an interesting point.  I can't deny that.  It seems however, Judaism allows for both an indwelling God and a non-indwelling God at the same time.  Judaism today sounds like a living contradiction of itself, as you pointed out earlier.  Perhaps Jews have no problems in praying in a mosque, but Islam is not as flexible in this regard as Jews are.
actually more flexible. I just looked it up and I was wrong oh no did I just say that laugh
It is permissible to pray in any place, as long the place is clean (tahir). However, praying in a church, temple or any other religious place without any necessity is makrooh.

It is possible that some people of those religions may not like to see us praying in their places of worship and we should not hurt other people’s feelings. If we have to pray in those places then we should take proper permission from the authorities that govern those sanctuaries.
http://www.onislam.net/english/ask-the-scholar/acts-of-worship/prayer/places-of-prayer-mosques/175423.html

 20 
 on: Today at 02:13:24 AM 
Started by Trebor135 - Last post by minasoliman
I am afraid if this is what you believe, you will be sorely disappointed.  May God bless you.

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